ESP Biography



HALEY COPE, MIT Freshman doing CS




Major: 6

College/Employer: MIT

Year of Graduation: 2018

Picture of Haley Cope

Brief Biographical Sketch:

Teaching makes me happy. Since you're at an ESP program, learning probably makes you happy. We can get something to work here.

I like game theory, programming, some theory stuff, cooking, and dancing. I am also really passionate about MIT being the best university ever. We refuse to be lame like Harvard and Caltech.



Past Classes

  (Look at the class archive for more.)


Women and Gender Studies 101 in Splash 2016 (Nov. 19 - 20, 2016)
What does it mean to study women and gender? How does race, class, and other factors influence people's lives? What is the place of philosophy and theory in the field? What about data? We'll discuss all this and more!


Game Theory and Social Behaviour in Splash 2016 (Nov. 19 - 20, 2016)
Can we explain love using math? Yes. What about beauty? Sure, why not. But we can't explain why we get angry or feel that we have the "right" to own property, right? Wrong! Of course we can. Game theory is a powerful tool in which we model the interaction of decision makers by saying they have strategies that earn them some kind of payoff. For example, two males can fight over a female, and can choose to fight-to-the-death or just display power to get the girl and be happy. What is the optimal action, and what should they do? In addition to answering questions about optimal actions, we will also be using tools from evolutionary dynamics to explain how these things, like beauty, can evolve over time. Combining these two ideas, we have a powerful way to explain the evolution of ideas and feelings that people have. I'll be teaching you all the material from a class that 120 MIT students took this fall. (see: http://isites.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=k101375) Are you ready? (Note: though this is a loaded and fasted-paced, I will be teaching you all of the basics. That being said, we won't dwell too long on these, so people who know game theory will still learn a lot.)


The Book of Genesis in Splash 2016 (Nov. 19 - 20, 2016)
The Book of Genesis is a heavy work, full of rich symbolism, a wide cast of characters, and interesting disconnect abound. We'll be taking a treatment from a literary perspective. While I hold religion and faith to be an important and meaningful thing, we will be looking purely at the text and not the beliefs/religions. This class will be discussion-based. Come prepared to interact and engage with the text and each other.


Feeling Blue in Splash 2016 (Nov. 19 - 20, 2016)
We all have down days but what if all of your days are down? Why do some people have difficulty with their daily activities just because of their brain? This class explores some of the science of depression and the human aspect of what to do if you or a friend is having trouble.


The Yellow Wallpaper in Splash 2016 (Nov. 19 - 20, 2016)
The Yellow Wallpaper is a short story by a women's rights activist named Gilman. It is a first person narrative of a woman who is diagnosed with hysteria. It explores questions of treatment, patient's rights, women's rights, and mental health. We will be discussing the major themes of the work, and how the writing style illustrates the challenges of the narrator. Please come prepared to discuss the work.


The Five Faces of Oppression in Splash 2016 (Nov. 19 - 20, 2016)
The Five Faces of Oppression (Young) is a classical work which aims to address the different ways in which minority groups are oppressed by majority groups. We will be discussing and defining the different faces, as well as questioning our own world for examples of them. Reading the work beforehand is not required, but may be helpful.


Game Theory and Social Behavior in Splash 2015 (Nov. 21 - 22, 2015)
Can we explain love using math? Yes. What about beauty? Sure, why not. But we can't explain why we get angry or feel that we have the "right" to own property, right? Wrong! Of course we can. Game theory is a powerful tool in which we model the interaction of decision makers by saying they have strategies that earn them some kind of payoff. For example, two males can fight over a female, and can choose to fight-to-the-death or just display power to get the girl and be happy. What is the optimal action, and what should they do? In addition to answering questions about optimal actions, we will also be using tools from evolutionary dynamics to explain how these things, like beauty, can evolve over time. Combining these two ideas, we have a powerful way to explain the evolution of ideas and feelings that people have. I'll be teaching you all the material from a class that 120 MIT students took this fall. (see: http://isites.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=k101375) Are you ready? (Note: though this is a loaded and fasted-paced, I will be teaching you all of the basics. That being said, we won't dwell too long on these, so people who know game theory will still learn a lot.)


Education in America in Splash 2015 (Nov. 21 - 22, 2015)
Have you ever wondered why politicians insist on making you take the same tests year after year? Or how education policy has evolved over time? In this class we will be looking at the educational goals of America from the 1900s to present.


Fuzzy Sets in Splash 2015 (Nov. 21 - 22, 2015)
Not everything in this world is black and white. We have degrees of connectedness with people, and we have varying quality machines for data collection. So why do we represent this data in absolutes? Here we will consider an alternative branch of mathematics called fuzzy set theory to provide a new explanation for these classic problems.


Non-Traditional Relationships in Splash 2015 (Nov. 21 - 22, 2015)
Society has a very standard model for how relationships work: boy meets girl, boy and girl fall in love, boy and girl marry, etc. Unfortunately, this is very exclusionary for many reasons. We'll look at these assumptions, and see how they effect our day-to-day life. In this class, we'll be addressing different relationship models (like polyamorous and open relationships), queer relationships, that it's okay to not want relationships, and more. This will be a very discussion heavy class, and questions and communication is encouraged.


Intro to Mental Health in Splash 2015 (Nov. 21 - 22, 2015)
Mental health is a really important topic, which is often stigmatized in the media. What is depression? What are different treatments for anxiety disorders? What is harmful about using the phrases "she's psycho" for an emotional woman, or with calling someone who changes their mind a lot "bipolar"? We'll be addressing this and more in this tip-of-the-iceberg class. Content warning: if you are uncomfortable discussing self-harm or suicide, this might not be be the best class for you.


Knitknitknit in Splash 2015 (Nov. 21 - 22, 2015)
Take some time to relax and learn a cool skill. Knitting is a great stress-relief that lets you see some progress as you loop string around and around. If you already know how to knit, bring a project you're working on and hang out with cool people and some music.


Game Theory and Emotions! in Spark 2015 (Mar. 14 - 15, 2015)
Can we explain love using math? Yes. What about beauty? Sure, why not. But we can't explain why we get angry or feel that we have the "right" to own property, right? Wrong! Of course we can. Game theory is a powerful tool in which we model the interaction of decision makers by saying they have strategies that earn them some kind of payoff. For example, two males can fight over a female, and can choose to fight-to-the-death or just display power to get the girl and be happy. What is the optimal action, and what should they do? In addition to answering questions about optimal actions, we will also be using tools from evolutionary dynamics to explain how these things, like beauty, can evolve over time. Combining these two ideas, we have a powerful way to explain the evolution of ideas and feelings that people have. I'll be teaching you all the material from a class that 120 MIT students took this fall. (see: http://isites.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=k101375) Are you ready? (Note: though this is a loaded and fasted-paced, I will be teaching you all of the basics. That being said, we won't dwell too long on these, so people who know game theory will still learn a lot)


Square Dancing! in Spark 2015 (Mar. 14 - 15, 2015)
Learn to square dance with us! We'll be covering basic calls such as do-si-do, allemand left, promenade, California twirl, star through and more!


Mocktails! in Spark 2015 (Mar. 14 - 15, 2015)
Mmm, delicious! Come learn how to make tasty (non-alcoholic) drinks with a plethora of ingredients including orange, mango and cranberry juice and actual fruit!


Graphs and Games in Spark 2015 (Mar. 14 - 15, 2015)
Did line graphs, bar graphs, and pie charts come to mind? Well, be prepared to be introduced to something completely new! Graphs are an interesting mathematical structure that consist of nodes (points) connected by edges (lines). We'll be learning about these, and then learn two cool games you can play with them!


Finite Automata in Spark 2015 (Mar. 14 - 15, 2015)
Computers are great. But have you wondered what happens if we try to strip down what they can do to their most basic form? In this class, we'll be covering deterministic finite automata, maybe have time to consider the non-deterministic counterpart, and then try to make one ourselves!


Cupcake Boss in Spark 2015 (Mar. 14 - 15, 2015)
Fierce Competition. Eternal Glory. Bloodshed*. Only the strong will survive the heat of our kitchen. Make and decorate scrumptious cupcakes and compete for the title of Spark Cupcake Boss. *There should not be any bloodshed.


Game Theory and Emotions! in Splash 2014 (Nov. 22 - 23, 2014)
Can we explain love using math? Yes. What about beauty? Sure, why not. But we can't explain why we get angry or feel that we have the "right" to own property, right? Wrong! Of course we can. Game theory is a powerful tool in which we model the interaction of decision makers by saying they have strategies that earn them some kind of payoff. For example, two males can fight over a female, and can choose to fight-to-the-death or just display power to get the girl and be happy. What is the optimal action, and what should they do? In addition to answering questions about optimal actions, we will also be using tools from evolutionary dynamics to explain how these things, like beauty, can evolve over time. Combining these two ideas, we have a powerful way to explain the evolution of ideas and feelings that people have. I'll be teaching you all the material from a class that 120 MIT students are taking this fall. (see: http://isites.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=k101375) Are you ready? (Note: though this is a loaded and fasted-paced, I will be teaching you all of the basics. That being said, we won't dwell too long on these, so people who know game theory will still learn a lot)


More Game Theory Than Your Body Has Room For in Splash 2014 (Nov. 22 - 23, 2014)
Ever wondered what a Nash equilibrium is? How about a Bayesian game? If you are interested in learning about formal definitions in game theory, we will be starting from the bottom up and covering all of the major components of game theory.


Particle Zoo in Splash 2014 (Nov. 22 - 23, 2014)
If you've ever thought that there's more to physics than throwing balls in a parabola and putting blocks on an inclined plane, then you should be here! Chemistry may have told you about protons, neutrons, and electrons, but are you ready to hear about sup quarks, skyrmions, and gluons? (The answer is yes)


Calculating Pi with a Coconut in Splash 2014 (Nov. 22 - 23, 2014)
If you're on a desert island with a coconut and a stick, would you be able to calculate pi? We'll look at this question, figure out how to do it, and then see how we can generalize this process (formally called "Monte Carlo Method") to other applications.