ESP Biography



JOHN BELL, MIT senior studying Mechanical Eng. and Philosophy




Major: Mechanical Engineering

College/Employer: MIT

Year of Graduation: 2018

Picture of John Bell

Brief Biographical Sketch:

I'm a senior at MIT, majoring in Mechanical Engineering (Course 2), and minoring in philosophy (Course 24). I've TA'ed several classes over the past few years, ranging from philosophy seminars and freshman physics to design and robotics classes. My research interests are primarily in control systems engineering and theory, as applied to power systems and robotics. Outside of school and work, I also enjoy making puzzles and curating memes.



Past Classes

  (Look at the class archive for more.)


Understanding Diplomacy through Wargaming in Spark 2018 (Mar. 17 - 18, 2018)
Much of historical European politics would have made more sense if you were there at the time. This class will give you a chance to recreate those politics. Take command of countries in a simple war game and learn about the balance of power by seeing it play out in action. Adapted from game created by Daniel Whalen; run with permission.


Understanding Diplomacy through Wargaming in Splash 2017 (Nov. 18 - 19, 2017)
Much of historical European politics would have made more sense if you were there at the time. This class will give you a chance to recreate those politics. Take command of countries in a simple war game and learn about the balance of power by seeing it play out in action. Adapted from game created by Daniel Whalen; run with permission.


Do We Have a Purpose? in Splash 2014 (Nov. 22 - 23, 2014)
In this class, we'll be discussing and comparing the philosophies of essentialism and existentialism, and whether or not our life have an inherent purpose. We will be exploring the views of ancient Greek philosophers, such as Aristotle and Plato, as well as the works of early 20th century philosophers Kierkagaard, Hume, and Sartre.


Introduction to Mathematica in Splash 2014 (Nov. 22 - 23, 2014)
In this class, we will learn the basics of Wolfram Mathematica, with a focus on visualization and modeling of both pure and applied math topics. We will cover topics ranging from probability theory applications (e.g. weather forecast accuracy) to crystal structure modeling to calculus applications. The class will conclude with a surprise application challenge! Mathematica is one of the major programming environments used for modeling in science, engineering, and pure mathematics. (For anyone who has used Wolfram|Alpha, Mathematica is the workhorse of the Wolfram system.) Regardless of programming experience, this class is a great way for students interested in science and engineering to learn to use professional computation software, from an exploratory application-based perspective.