ESP Biography



TAL SCULLY, PhD Student at Harvard Systems Biology Dept.




Major: Physics and Theater Arts

College/Employer: MIT

Year of Graduation: 2018

Picture of Tal Scully

Brief Biographical Sketch:

Hi! I'm a first year graduate student studying Systems Biology at Harvard. I get particularly excited by all the highly mathematical aspects of biology, and will talk with anyone who will listen about the clever applications of even simple mathematics to understanding wildly complex biological systems.

Having recently graduated from MIT with a double major in Physics and Theater Arts, I enjoy everything from acting Shakespeare, to analyzing wavefunctions of atomic orbitals, to eating cannolis.



Past Classes

  (Look at the class archive for more.)


Math in Biology in Splash 2018 (Nov. 17 - 18, 2018)
Computational biology is an exciting field where researchers find ways of understanding biological systems through mathematics. Come learn about how we can use high-dimensional math to analyze single-cell RNA sequencing data in an effort to answer some of the most fundamental questions in biology.


Crystal Field Theory: How atomic dumbells make metals colorful in Splash 2017 (Nov. 18 - 19, 2017)
Ever wondered why transition metals have such vibrant and different colors? A cobalt ion surrounded by 6 groups of ammonia (NH$$_3$$) is yellow, but replacing one ammonia with chloride (Cl$$^-$$) makes it magenta. Come learn about Crystal Field Theory, which dives into the physics of electron orbitals to explain why transition metals are so pretty!


Math in Biology in Splash 2017 (Nov. 18 - 19, 2017)
Computational biology is an exciting field where researchers find ways of understanding biological systems through mathematics. Come learn about how we can use high-dimensional math to analyze single-cell RNA sequencing data in an effort to answer some of the most fundamental questions in biology.


Crystal Field Theory: How atomic dumbells make metals colorful in Splash 2016 (Nov. 19 - 20, 2016)
Ever wondered why transition metals have such vibrant and different colors? A cobalt ion surrounded by 6 groups of ammonia (NH3) is yellow, but replacing one ammonia with chloride (Cl-) makes it magenta. Come learn about Crystal Field Theory, which dives into the physics of electron orbitals to explain why transition metals are so pretty!


Rails and Relativity in Splash 2016 (Nov. 19 - 20, 2016)
You may have heard of Einstein's theory of Special Relativity, which describes the physics of objects moving close to the speed of light. It's a good example of how physics can get really weird, with time itself depending on your position and velocity in space. But how does this come about? Come learn about the claims of special relativity and learn how to derive the most basic principles... with trains!


From Exponents to Entropy in Splash 2016 (Nov. 19 - 20, 2016)
If you have taken Chemistry, you may be familiar with some of the difficult-to-define concepts of thermodynamics. "Heat" means something slightly different than what you'd expect, "entropy" is vaguely described as "disorder", and "enthalpy" is it's own beast that even some MIT professors can't explain. But we can do better! Come learn how math and data structures can help explain the true meaning of "disorderly" entropy at the microscopic scale.


Needs Improv'ment in Splash 2015 (Nov. 21 - 22, 2015)
Ever wonder how actors can make up a scene on the spot without any planning? Come play lots of improv and theater games and learn how to expand your abilities as an actor and a person!


Theater Games in Splash 2015 (Nov. 21 - 22, 2015)
Come play theater games with members of the MIT Shakespeare Ensemble! From freeze to zip-zap-zop, it'll be loads of fun!


Crystal Field Theory: How atomic dumbels make metals colorful in Splash 2015 (Nov. 21 - 22, 2015)
Ever wondered why transition metals have such vibrant and different colors? A cobalt ion surrounded by 6 groups of ammonia (NH3) is yellow, but replacing one ammonia with chloride (Cl-) makes it magenta. Come learn about Crystal Field Theory, which dives into the physics of electron orbitals to explain why transition metals are so pretty!


Room for Improv'ment in Spark 2015 (Mar. 14 - 15, 2015)
Ever wonder how actors can make up a scene on the spot without any planning? Come play lots of improv and theater games and learn how to expand your abilities as an actor and a person!


Crystal Field Theory: How atomic dumbels make metals colorful! in Splash 2014 (Nov. 22 - 23, 2014)
Ever wondered why transition metals have such vibrant and different colors? A cobalt ion surrounded by 6 groups of ammonia (NH3) is yellow, but replacing one ammonia with chloride (Cl-) makes it magenta! Come learn about Crystal Field Theory, which dives into the physics of electron orbitals to explain why transition metals are so pretty!


Room for Improv'ment in Splash 2014 (Nov. 22 - 23, 2014)
Ever wonder how actors can make up a scene on the spot without any planning? Come play lots of improv and theater games and learn how to expand your abilities as an actor and a person!