ESP Biography



SARANESH PREMBABU, ESP Teacher




Major: Physics

College/Employer: MIT

Year of Graduation: 2019

Picture of Saranesh Prembabu

Brief Biographical Sketch:

Not Available.



Past Classes

  (Look at the class archive for more.)


What? Where? When? - Russian Game Show! in Spark 2018 (Mar. 17 - 18, 2018)
Что? Где? Когда? ("Chto? Gde? Kogda?", English "Who? Where? When?") is a competitive intellectual game very popular across Russia and the former Soviet Union. Teams guess clever answers to challenging trivia questions. Come join us to play a round, have fun, and win prizes! Удачи вам! (you do not need to have formed a team in advance)


Integration Bee! in Splash 2017 (Nov. 18 - 19, 2017)
Come participate in an integration bee (YES, A CONTEST), similar to the one held at MIT annually, and then learn some calculus from us afterwards! Winner of the bee (the GRAND INTEGRATOR) gets a prize TBD.


What? Where? When? - Russian Game Show! in Splash 2017 (Nov. 18 - 19, 2017)
Что? Где? Когда? ("Chto? Gde? Kogda?", English "Who? Where? When?") is a competitive intellectual game very popular across Russia and the former Soviet Union. Teams guess clever answers to challenging trivia questions. Come join us to play a round, have fun, and win prizes! Удачи вам! (you do not need to have formed a team in advance)


Theory of Special Relativity in Splash 2017 (Nov. 18 - 19, 2017)
Time machines aren't just science fiction! With simple and intuitive thought experiments and a bit of math, you too can learn the physics that made Einstein famous! We will start with the basics of length contraction and time dilation and move on to look at the symmetries of four vectors and the Lorentz group in the Minkowski spacetime manifold, changing the way you think of position and time forever.


The Great Language Game in Spark 2017 (Mar. 11 - 12, 2017)
Learn to sound smart by pretending to be able to recognize any language you hear. In the process explore our world's linguistic diversity through this interactive class.


Statistical Physics of Materials in Splash 2016 (Nov. 19 - 20, 2016)
Real life materials are full of intricate properties and interactions. Using elementary math and fundamental principles, we will unravel these mysteries all the way down to the quantum scale to understand why materials are the way they are. Join to learn about the Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac probability distributions and their implications. We will also be introduced to elegant mathematical tricks such as partition functions and mean field theory. With simple derivations, we can make powerful predictions, like what makes a material an insulator, why neutron stars form, when does a material become magnetic or change phase, and how fast do things heat up.


Winning in Spark 2016 (Mar. 12 - 13, 2016)
In this course you will learn how to win. Game theory is a useful tool for analyzing all sorts of strategic activities, from childhood games to nuclear war. We will learn how to mathematically understand what constitutes good game play, and then apply this surprisingly simple but powerful logic to devising strategies to (almost) guarantee winning at various two-player games. The focus will be on optimal strategies for impartial combinatorial games, but we will study other types of games as well.


Theory of Special Relativity in Splash 2015 (Nov. 21 - 22, 2015)
Time machines aren't just science fiction! With simple and intuitive thought experiments and a bit of math, you too can learn the physics that made Einstein famous! We will start with the basics of length contraction and time dilation and move on to look at the symmetries of four vectors and the Lorentz group in the Minkowski spacetime manifold, changing the way you think of position and time forever.


Counting with Algebra: An Introduction to Generating Functions in Splash 2015 (Nov. 21 - 22, 2015)
Generating Functions are a powerful counting technique which encodes combinatorial information in polynomials and formal series, which can then be manipulated algebraically, thereby reducing a counting problem to an algebra problem. In this class, we will discuss how to use generating functions to solve difficult counting problems.