Splash! 2010
Course Catalog

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Computer Science Mathematics
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Walk-in Seminar

Classes listed below are from Splash 2010, NOT 2011. To access the current catalog, click the "Splash 2011 Catalog" link at the top of this page.

If you wish to attend a walk-in seminar, leave a BLANK slot in your schedule when the class is running. Please disregard the "full" labels in this catalog. None of the walk-in seminars are full and you are welcome to attend any of them.

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Arts

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A4368: Subversive Humor
Difficulty: Easy - This class is meant to be accessible to most students
Teachers: Volunteer Teacher

I'm going to define "subversive humor" as jokes that don't fit into the established formulas for joke telling. This is probably a horrible definition.

We'll go over a few examples of the best "subversive humor", and then I'm going to tell my favorite subversive joke. It may take a half hour to tell.


Prerequisites
Oddball sense of humor, Ability to appreciate high art, Incredible patience

A4133: Music Theory 1: Music Fundamentals Full!
Teachers: Russell Cohen

What is that whole music thing? This course will go through the absolute basics -- the staff, clefs, sharps, flats and basic rhythm.


Prerequisites
None! In fact, you shouldn't take this course if you have a basic understanding of Music Theory -- Take Music Theory 2 or 3 instead.

A4142: History of Musical Theater Full!

Gershwin, Porter, Rogers & Hammerstein, Sondheim and Larson. Come learn about the growth of musical comedy, the great American theater form. Where did it come from? Where is it going? and why is the entire score of RENT so freaking catchy? Come find out!

A3897: Architecture of the Home Full!
Teachers: Luke Joyner

Chances are you live somewhere. Most of us do. And so have most people for years and years. Somebody's gotta design the places we live, and there have been tons of interesting ideas about how to do so, over the years. This class will go over some ideas and debates about how homes ought to look, feel and work. We'll look at tons of examples--normal and strange, beautiful and ugly, big and small--and discuss some interesting questions that have arisen when people think a little differently about houses and housing than you might expect.


Prerequisites
An interest in architecture or urban planning or cities or just the idea of home. Come ready to think about the examples we see, and join the conversation.

A4356: Introduction to AutoCAD Full!

We will be learning some simple solid modeling techniques.

A4180: Make your own Hummus Full!
Teachers: Erika Bildsten

We'll be experimenting with tasty hummus, and concluding with a hummus taste-off between our inventions

A4027: Singing Loudly Full!
Difficulty: Easy - This class is meant to be accessible to most students
Teachers: Mindy Or

but keeping it smooth!
Project your voice without damaging your vocal chords (and get a smidge closer to sounding like an opera singer).

(What do you mean, breathe with your diaphragm? Doesn't all breathing involve your diaphragm?)

We will do vocal exercises, practice projection, and test techniques to reach those difficult notes.

Feel free to contact me at mindo1@umbc.edu if you have anything in particular you would like to me to address.


Prerequisites
An open mind and a wide grin

A4044: How to Listen to Classical Music Full!
Teachers: A Z

Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, Booorrrring.... Nah, by that logic, you'd have to include the Beatles ;-). We invite you to explore classical music with your emotions and your mind. This is a very interactive session where we try to identify the essence of what the music is speaking to us. The class will be structured as a tour of the various eras of classical music starting from the 1600s onwards. You will leave longing download more classical music onto your iPods.

A4048: Introduction to Chinese Art History
Teachers: Lily Chan

Learn about Chinese Art History


Prerequisites
Interest in Chinese culture and art

A3810: Crocheting is not for Grandma. Full!
Teachers: Lizi George

Come learn to a crochet flowers, stars, hearts and other cool stuff :D


Prerequisites
A strong desire to immerse oneself in the wonder of crocheting.

A4136: Music Theory 2: Intervals, Triads, and Modes
Teachers: Russell Cohen

Building on the material in Music Theory 1, Music Theory 2 covers: Modal Scales, Intervals, Triads, Inversions and basic Roman Numeral analysis. We will apply our knowledge and perform theoretical analysis of both classical and Pop Music.


Prerequisites
Music Theory 1 OR: A working knowledge of music theory -- clefs, key signatures and rhythms

A4276: Chinese Calligraphy and Brush Painting Full!

Ever wonder how those beautiful Chinese paintings were made? Want to learn how to transform Chinese characters into elegant scrolls of Chinese calligraphy?

If so, this is the class for you! Come join us in this fun introductory course to Chinese Calligraphy and Brush Painting.

A3733: Testing the Waters of Japanese Culture

Part lecture, part demonstration, and part workshop, you will get a chance to learn about many aspects of traditional Japanese culture, including Japanese traditional attire, music, dance, and theater as well as cultural arts such as tea ceremony and ikebana (flower arrangement).

Participation in the workshop component is not required, you are more than welcome to just come to watch and learn. Please note also that supplies are limited, so depending on class size not every student may be able to participate in the workshop section.

A3914: Beginner Poi Full!
Teachers: Nathan Lachenmyer

Poi is a performance art where a ball on a string is swung around in circular patterns. It originated as a traditional Maori dance form, it is quickly expanded to be a popular performance art around the world. If you've always wanted to learn poi, or just want to come and see what it is, this is the class for you.

For people that have taken previous poi classes at Splash, please see Intermediate Poi.

A4140: Ear Training 1: Intervals and Rhythms
Teachers: Russell Cohen

The sister class to Music Theory 1 -- Ear Training 1 will get you on track to the lofty goal of being able to transcribe the music you hear by starting with the basics -- intervals, triads and rhythms.


Prerequisites
Music Theory 1 or Equivalent knowledge of intervals

A3866: Psychedelic Knitting Full!
Teachers: Kate Rudolph

Learn to knit... in bright, ever-changing colors! Start from the basics of casting on, knitting, garter stitch, and binding off. Take your needles and leftover yarn with you to get started on your own projects!


Prerequisites
None!

A3896: Covers: An Open Studio
Teachers: Luke Joyner

Cover, remix, adaptation, interpretation, inspiration, allusion, precedent, copy, appropriation, theft... whatever you call it, a good cover takes an original work and twists it around till it's something else. A great cover manages to do all that, and makes the original seem even more interesting too.

This process is hardly limited to music. Artists take inspiration and pay homage to other artists, poets to other poets, architects to other architects, etc. And sometimes artists take from musicians, musicians from architects, architects from athletes, and so on. When does it work, and where does meaning come from along the way?

In this class, we'll think about "covering" in all sorts of ways. How do you take an idea from someone else and put it toward art that both honors its source and generates new meaning? Where is the line between homage and theft? Can meaning ever come out of nowhere? Can it ever not?

I'll give plenty of examples to get us going, but everyone in the class should be ready to bring ideas and examples to the table too.... this is a studio-type class, so bring work of your own to talk about if possible. (Poems, drawings, guitars, soufflés, etc.... anything goes, but whatever you bring, be prepared to show or perform your work and get ideas from others.) If you're feeling ambitious, bring work that responds in some way to some other art out there, in your medium or another, that really moves you.


Prerequisites
Only that you bring some sort of creative work to the table. If you really want to take the class, but don't think you're an artist or a poet or an architect or a chef or a musician or whatever, you're probably wrong... go to a museum or concert or read some poetry or do anything else that moves you deeply, get inside of it, and then try your hand at *something* of your own. Picasso had to start somewhere too. (If you have a chance to drop me an email telling me your interests and what kind of work you plan to bring, that'd be awesome... but if not, no worries.)

A4012: Poetry Workshop

Read and talk about poetry YOU'VE written! In this class, each student will bring one poem which everyone will read and discuss. The aim of the class is to give new ideas and critical feedback about the students' poetry. We will also talk about some of the nuts and bolts of poetry: forms, literary terms, techniques, etc.

A3867: Gnittink Full!
Teachers: Kate Rudolph

Psychedelic Knitting isn't enough for you? Try Knitting Backwards: Gnittink, or more commonly, Purling! Use your basic knitting skills and bring your needles back to learn Stockinette stitch and make nice, smooth patterns. And you're using the same yarn so it's still psychedelic!


Prerequisites
Backwards Knitting

A3928: Data Visualization: Beauty in Numbers
Teachers: Desiree Koh

Let's present some data! Learn how to create data visuals that are attractive and meaningful. We'll go through data design principles as well as examples of excellent data design. We'll also look into new methods for interactive data visualization.


Prerequisites
This is about making something meaningful. Math or number skills recommended but not necessary.

A4108: It Doesn't Just Taste Good!
Difficulty: Easy - This class is meant to be accessible to most students
Teachers: Casey Dugan

In this class, we’ll make sculptures out of chocolate! But, they’ll look so good you won’t want to eat them when you’re through. In previous years students have come up with all kinds of creative designs: dragons, islands, scenes from books, space ships, turtles, houses, horses, abstract pieces, sunflowers, lily pads, chess boards, painters’ palettes, breakfast, a clock, a wedding dress, three turkeys, pyramids, trees, playing cards, robots, pumpkins, the Apple Logo, a Snitch and the Sorting Hat, and more. Candy bars don’t count… :) Come with ideas or come up with something on the spot! Those with food allergies: Chocolate may contain peanuts or peanut products. Sorry. :(


Prerequisites
None

A3986: Make a dodecahedron from beads Full!
Teachers: Christie Chiu

Want to make useless geometric shapes* out of beads? NOW YOU CAN! But hey, they look impressive.

*One shape: A dodecahedron. A fancy one.


Prerequisites
Some knowledge or intuition of 3-D symmetry (of a dodecahedron) and experience with arts & crafts may be helpful, but aren't necessary.

A4212: How to make plush sushi Full!

Nothing edible, just the kind of sushi you normally sleep on.

A3716: A Brief History of Punk Full!
Teachers: Amber Bennoui

Why are those kids wearing studded jackets and sporting hair of neon hues? What's that noise to which they're enthusiastically listening and why are they flailing? While I can't promise the entire history of the punk subculture, I will explain how the style came to be, how the music developed and how other it influenced other subcultures.

A4104: Introduction to Digital Audio Production
Teachers: Stephen Poletto

In this course we will learn the fundamental basics of digital audio production. With more sophisticated commercial audio production software available, musicians are increasingly doing production work themselves as opposed to paying for professional sound engineers. We will consider how sound is represented in computer architecture, and then move on to various processing techniques, such as compression and equalization. By the end of the class, students will have all the basic skills to do their own mixing and mastering.


Prerequisites
No prerequisites.

A3941: Rock Opera: The Definition and Legacy of an Era-Part 1
Teachers: James Penna

Rock Opera- quite possibly the most expressive and important form of musical arts in mankind's history. This lecture is the first of a two-day exploration of the genre "Rock Opera." This first lecture will consist of watching The Who's seminal rock opera "Tommy," followed by heavy jiving and discussion. Of course movie snacks will be provided. Note- meant as part of a two-day series, so please also register for the "Part 2" class on Sunday.


Prerequisites
An appreciation for trippy animation and classic/early progressive rock. No rap, hip-hop, blues, or scream-o allowed. No knowledge of how to play a musical instrument required at all.

A4315: How to Write a Murder Mystery/Soap Opera/Drama Full!
Teachers: Andi Wang

Tired of playing Truth or Dare all the time and wanting to create a party game that will knock the socks off your guests? Want to capture the hearts of teenage girls all over with the next Twilight? Curious about what murder mysteries games and TV dramas have in common and how they can be taught in the same class? Interested in being a desperate housewife, an uber-playboy, or anything in between for three hours? Or would you just like have a clean, fun, interactive time with your fellow creative high schoolers?

Then come learn the basics of writing murder mysteries and soap operas. In this class, you will work in small groups to write a murder mystery that you can then play with your friends with, or a script for an episode of a soap opera, or both, depending on your interests and how much time we have, and see the fruits of your labor acted out by you or your peers afterwards.

Get ready for drama, get ready for intrigue, and get ready for the exciting life of characters in popular entertainment.


Prerequisites
Tolerance of discussing all sorts of extreme scandalous situations and pretending to be in such situations

A3818: How to Write Bad Fanfiction Full!
Teachers: Deena Wang

Have you ever read something so horrible on the internet that you needed brain bleach? Want to inflict unspeakable horrors upon the minds of others using only a shot glass, a traffic cone, and a bottle of coke? Then come learn how to write bad fanfiction!
Class includes theory behind bad fanfiction, and a brainstorming session afterwards.
Warning: Will most certainly contain mature themes, violence, and distasteful behavior


Prerequisites
Ability to read and write English. Knowledge of what fanfiction is.

A4195: Truth in Comedy: Improv Comedy Full!

Do you have the funny? Do you want to learn how to get it? Come learn about the truth in comedy as taught by MIT’s premier improv group: Roadkill Buffet.


Prerequisites
None, though theater experience is helpful.

A3940: Rock Opera: The Definition and Legacy of an Era-Part 2
Teachers: James Penna

The second part of a two day series! Rock on! Students will partake of Pink Floyd's seminal progressive rock trip known as "The Wall." Further jiving and discussion of the rock opera afterward. Meant to be taken in conjunction with the first day's lecture on the Who's "Tommy," so unless you are familiar with "Tommy," please register for both classes-Part 1 and Part 2.


Prerequisites
An appreciation for trippy animation and classic/early progressive rock. No rap, blues, hip-hop, or scream-o allowed. Knowledge of how to play a musical instrument not required at all.

A4252: Ukulele Full!
Difficulty: Hard - This class may be exceptionally difficult
Teachers: luke plummer

Ukuleles are awesome and easy to play! Learn the basics of uking from Lukulele himself, and then play ukulele favorites from Jake Shimabakuro to Train!


Prerequisites
Must have minimum of 3 fingers distributed over at least 2 hands. No musical experience necessary.

A4330: The Physics of Music Full!
Difficulty: Hard - This class may be exceptionally difficult
Teachers: Russell Cohen

A segment of the popular HSSP class, "The Music Class You've Never Taken", this class will take a whirlwind tour of the Physics behind music. Topics will include:
The physics of sound formation; resonance; human hearing and sound perception, indoor acoustics, acoustic compression, and why Yo-Yo Ma's cello costs 2.5 Million Dollars.


Prerequisites
A love of music and physics. A background in waves and vibrations from a conceptual standpoint will also be helpful.

A4018: History, Sub-genres, and Appreciation of Metal Music Full!
Difficulty: Easy - This class is meant to be accessible to most students
Teachers: Nathan Partlan

Musical taste is controversial. Heavy Metal has always been especially so. Come learn about the storied and rich history of Metal. Be captivated by the energy of it, the uncompromising devotion to making music that is good instead of popular. Break free of the reins of lackluster, auto-tuned pop and discover the heights of music's potential. Note: We will not discuss musical theory in great detail.


Prerequisites
Willingness to hear cursing - Metal songs often contain strong language, and they will not be censored in this class.

A3891: How to not Fail at Cosplay
Difficulty: Easy - This class is meant to be accessible to most students
Teachers: Letitia Li

Cosplay means dressing up as anime or video game characters, for an anime convention or maybe just Halloween. Learn what makes your character recognizable, and what will get you posted on "Top 10 worst cosplays".


Prerequisites
Some knowledge of common video games + animes

A3762: Splash Concert Choir 2010

Like to sing? Have you ever had the urge to get together with total strangers - and some friends?
Then this class is perfect for you!

Please specify your voice part, and if you can, drag friends.

The goals in this class are to work on blending, tone quality, vibrato (when and when not to use), singing with Divisis, maintaining pitch, holding longer notes, and choreographical skills (for certain pieces).


Prerequisites
1.) No formal singing experience required, just willingness to be challenged! 2.) Some choral experience is helpful, but you don't have to be a professional.

A4290: Costume Makeup 101 Full!
Teachers: Courtney Hilliard

This isn't your grandma's makeup! Play around with costuming makeup and gain some tricks of the trade. Learn how to make fake wounds and scars; use props and prosthetics to change your look; experiment on yourselves and each other.

You _must_ inform the teacher if you have an allergy to latex, aluminum, or any other compounds that may be common in makeup or costuming materials. Liquid latex is very common in costuming, and we'll be using a lot of it, so use your judgment.


Prerequisites
Health tolerance for common makeup compounds (or willingness to sit and observe techniques that use allergens) Willingness to get messy and test out makeup (not just apply it to others) Interest in stage makeup Patience and enthusiasm!

A4318: Simple Baking Full!

Learn how to create a couple favorites from scratch: Rice krispie treats and apple crumble! No baking expertise necessary (Trust me...).


Prerequisites
None

A4098: Camp Rock 2: Learn the Dance Full!
Teachers: Tara Ebsworth

Want to learn the 'Can't Back Down' dance from the Disney Channel Original Movie Camp Rock 2:The Final Jam? It's on! Get ready to have some fun and tear it down, Camp Rock style! Bring your moves, your dancing shoes (or just your regular shoes), and let's rock hard or go home.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r0kycFwF7Mo

A3881: Introduction to SLR Photography
Teachers: Ian Martin

Ever wondered how to use one of those big, professional-looking cameras? Come learn the basics of aperture, shutter speed, ISO, and maybe even some tips on composition. I'm far from the most professional photographer around, but I'll be glad to show you the basics. Hopefully we'll have time for you all to take some pictures yourselves.

A4308: Great Modulations in the History of Music
Difficulty: Hard - This class may be exceptionally difficult
Teachers: Russell Cohen

From the transparent modulations roots of the common practice period to the truck-driver modulations of modern pop music, this course will undertake an in-depth study of several amazing modulations. We will begin with an (brief) overview Roman Numerals look at the general idea of modulation. From there, we will dive in depth into some of the greatest modulations of all time.


Prerequisites
A strong background in Music Theory -- AP Music Theory OR "TMCYNT" OR equivalent. This class will be very technical and is intended for someone who has a strong grasp of Roman Numeral analysis.

A4344: Art of Improv Full!
Teachers: Rahat Bathija

Students perform improv, Basically teaching and doing "Who's Line is it Anyways?" type stuff.


Prerequisites
Have an open mind

A4370: Three- and Four-Chord Songs Full!
Teachers: Benjamin Sena

Perhaps you've seen Four Chord Song by The Axis of Awesome or The Pachelbel Rant on YouTube. Come learn most of the songs you've ever heard in two hours.


Prerequisites
You should bring a chord instrument in order to participate in this class. While I may have a few guitars, an accordion, a mandolin, and a piano provided, I can't guarantee I will have enough for everyone or the one you want for you. You might want to know a few chords beforehand, but I also to instruct those without much prior experience as well as those who have more of a handle already. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5pidokakU4I http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JdxkVQy7QLM

A3915: Intermediate Poi Full!
Teachers: Nathan Lachenmyer

Tired of the same old three-beat and butterfly patterns? Come to this class to learn a variety of new tricks and how to transition smoothly between them! Aimed at people who have practiced poi on their own before or have taken a course during a previous Splash.

A3719: To Infinity and Beyond! The History of Pixar Full!
Teachers: Ari Donnelly

Do you find yourself looking at all your old toys that you haven't played with for years, and feeling very guilty? Have you ever tried tying a thousand balloons to your chimney in the hope that your house will take off and fly away? Have you been neglecting to call the pest exterminator for months on end, out of fear that the rats in your house will stop cooking exquisite French cuisine for you if you do so?

Do want to know who's responsible for these strange feelings you keep having? Come to Infinity and Beyond! You'll find out how these pesky Pixar people got their start, and how they have become one of the most successful and critically acclaimed film studios of all time*.

*You'll also learn why this last part of the sentence is a big understatement.


Prerequisites
Seeing at least a couple of Pixar movies beforehand is a decent idea.

A3839: Operating a Giraffe at Subzero Temperatures Full!

Ever wish you were an astronaut? Harry Potter? Or operating a giraffe at subzero temperatures? Be whoever you want to be with our improv acting seminar! Prepare yourself for a class that suddenly becomes a rocket ship, with diamonds in your hands that suddenly become tickets to that favourite show. I'm on a horse.

A3960: Bhangra! Bhangra! Bhangra! (Indian Dance)

If you're looking to learn a new style of dance or if you want a full-body workout while having lots of fun, this is the class for you. Bhangra is an energetic folk dance from the north Indian state of Punjab, and in this class we'll be showing you how it's done. We'll start from the basics and then teach you a full Bhangra dance that you can take back with you, show off to your friends, and perform in your school's talent shows.

Check out Bhangra videos from last year's class at the following url: http://web.mit.edu/abhagi/www/Splash/


Prerequisites
A strong desire to learn a fun new style of dance!

A4291: Drawing Fantastical and Alien Creatures
Teachers: Courtney Hilliard

Want to do better than the loads of crappy dragon art out there on the Internets? Or maybe draw aliens that don't look like Star Trek characters? Want to sit and art with your pals while learning from each other and a teacher? This is the place to be.

Drawing Fantastical and Alien Creatures is an interactive art class. Students will bring their own pencils and paper (or other art supplies) and learn how to create plausibly structured fictional non-human creatures. The class is question-based; what material is covered depends on what students ask, and they will brainstorm among themselves as well as receiving answers from the teacher.Want to do better than the loads of crappy dragon art out there on the Internets? Or maybe draw aliens that don't look like Star Trek characters? Want to sit and art with your pals while learning from each other and a teacher? This is the place to be.

Drawing Fantastical and Alien Creatures is an interactive art class. Students will bring their own pencils and paper (or other art supplies) and learn how to create plausibly structured fictional non-human creatures. The class is question-based; what material is covered depends on what students ask, and they will brainstorm among themselves as well as receiving answers from the teacher.


Prerequisites
Basic knowledge of drawing (foreshortening, illusion of distance, basic shading) Art supplies and surface (at least pencil and paper) Willingness to speak up in class and ask questions

A3869: Not Your Average Cootie-Catcher Full!

Come practice the ancient Japanese art of awesome-gami on a whole new level you never knew existed. Modular origami, kusudama specifically, is an amazing, beautiful branch of this craft, folding many parts to put together into one giant ball of awesome. Come and make something totally ridiculous with us!


Prerequisites
Nada, as we are unleashing the force from within to rush through the channels of our minds and souls.

A4069: Weaving Chainmail Full!

Weave metal rings into awesome fabrics! Learn the basic weaves, the same ones used by the Roman Army. Make anything from delicate jewelry to armor that will stop a sword.


Prerequisites
Two hands, and patience

A3898: Design a Building: An All-Day Studio
Difficulty: Hard - This class may be exceptionally difficult
Teachers: Luke Joyner

This is an all day comprehensive studio class that will give you a chance to work on a real architecture project, in teams of three.

In the morning (9 to 12 and if more time is desired, informally during lunch from 12 to 2), we will walk to a site on the MIT campus (bring comfortable shoes and be ready to be on your feet all morning) and do sketches and measurements and take pictures of the surroundings.

When we come back from lunch in the afternoon (2 to 5) each team will take the morning's site work and come up with a design for a building, taking into account a series of constraints (what the building is for, zoning restrictions, how much space is needed, etc.) I'll be giving teams feedback throughout the process, and we'll pause at least once for teams to give each other feedback.

Finally, from 5 to 7, each team will present their work to a panel of outsiders, who will, along with other students in the class, give feedback and ideas about the final designs from many perspectives. As in any real architecture project, and any Splash class, the end is only the beginning...

All work will be done by hand, with the exception of taking pictures at the site for reference. If you have a digital camera, bring it, and also bring the cable to attach it to a computer. Also bring your favorite pens, pencils or sketchbooks if you'd like.


Prerequisites
An interest in architecture, the ability to focus over the course of a whole day on one project, and the openness to listen to feedback and build upon it. (We'll take breaks, and you'll be amazed what you can do in a day.) Some background in drawing would be helpful, but is not necessary. (Note: I've listed the class as grades 11 and 12 only because this is a crazy long class and you need to be able to stay focused throughout. If you are in 9th or 10th grade and have a very very strong interest in the subject, and think you can handle a day-long class, and it would make your year to be in the class, and you can convince me of all that, let me know and we'll see about it.)

A3993: Screenprinting Full!

Like to draw? Have a bunch of awesome sketches lying around at home? Come learn how to screenprint, so you can wear your own rad designs and make limitless numbers of posters for everyone to enjoy! We will be drawing some cool designs in groups, learning the techniques of printing using screens, fancy photoemulsion, and ink, and making posters and/or t-shirts with your very own design on them. Designs can be hand-drawn or digitally made, and each student will print his or her own copy of the group's design.


Prerequisites
None

A4311: BOOM Photoshop Full!
Teachers: Vincent Lee

A crash course in Photoshop techniques and theory. We will start with the basics of the program and speed on to advanced to techniques and world replication.

A4113: The Big Bang Happened Everywhere Full!
Teachers: Molly Swanson

We live in a universe full of mysteries. You've probably heard that our universe started in a "Big Bang", but what does that really mean? It's not a "bang" in the traditional sense, but a stretching of space itself. Understanding the true nature of this expansion reveals a surprising fact: the Big Bang happened everywhere! What's more, over 90 percent of our universe is made up of substances we don't understand: dark matter and even more mysterious dark energy. Please come join us for an exciting discussion about our amazing universe.


Prerequisites
An understanding of graphing in the x-y coordinate plane

A4440: Culimprov: Cooking Without Recipes Full!
Difficulty: Easy - This class is meant to be accessible to most students

Ever wonder how the Iron Chefs like Mario Batali devise such elegant “recipes” off the top of their heads? Or how some chefs can just put together a complete dinner with a very limited number ingredients?

They all share a secret which all great chefs know: “don’t use a recipe!” Cooking is an Art, not a Science. It requires a great deal of creativity, not precise measurement. It also requires an in-depth knowledge of the basic building blocks of the culinary arts.

In this class, you will learn how to cook without a recipe by exercising your creative minds and learning about the foundations of cooking. By the end of the class, you will be able to put the two together and open a new door of culinary freedom.

Check this out: http://mcqueen.mit.edu/splash


Prerequisites
Passion for cooking and a big appetite

A3824: Culimprov: Cooking Without Recipes Full!
Difficulty: Easy - This class is meant to be accessible to most students

Ever wonder how the Iron Chefs like Mario Batali devise such elegant "recipes" off the top of their heads? Or how some chefs can just put together a complete dinner with a very limited number ingredients?

They all share a secret which all great chefs know: "don't use a recipe!" Cooking is an Art, not a Science. It requires a great deal of creativity, not precise measurement. It also requires an in-depth knowledge of the basic building blocks of the culinary arts.

In this class, you will learn how to cook without a recipe by exercising your creative minds and learning about the foundations of cooking. By the end of the class, you will be able to put the two together and open a new door of culinary freedom.

Check this out: http://mcqueen.mit.edu/splash


Prerequisites
Passion for Food Appetite


Computer Science

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C3813: Intro to Ruby Full!
Teachers: Jennifer Melot

Come learn how to program in Ruby!


Prerequisites
Some familiarity with another object-oriented programming language will be assumed. This class won't be interesting to anyone who already knows anything about Ruby.

C4194: Terrain Generation
Teachers: Alan Huang

Suppose you're developing a game, like Civilization or Minecraft, that needs to generate large, realistic worlds. A flat plain is pretty boring, so you want lakes and rivers, shorelines that look natural, tall mountain ranges... and these all have to be created on the fly. We'll look at some algorithms for doing this efficiently, and how they match up with reality.


Prerequisites
Knowledge of Python is helpful but not necessary. Familiarity with plane geometry and probability distributions (at the least) is assumed.

C3727: Introduction to Arch Linux Full!
Teachers: David Lawrence

Arch Linux is a minimalist Linux distribution that provides a very different experience from "mainstream" distributions like Ubuntu. Arch is configured by hand using text files and the command line. It can take a lot of work to set up, but the user is given complete control over their system.

In the first part of the course, I'll talk about exactly what makes Arch Linux so powerful and demonstrate the most interesting parts of Arch. The remainder of the class will be a hands-on exploration directed by you.


Prerequisites
You should have a little Linux experience already. Bring a laptop if you have one.

C4373: Put yourself into the internet!

Hello, internet users, look at your webpage, now back to mine, now back at your webpage, now back to mine. Sadly, yours isn’t mine, but if you stop using Dreamweaver and learn HTML, yours could look like mine. Swan dive.


Prerequisites
None! This is an introductory class. Beginners are encouraged to register.

C3988: Amazing Algorithms - Network Flow Part 1 Full!
Difficulty: Hard - This class may be exceptionally difficult
Teachers: Michael Cohen

There are tons of different optimization problems out there in computer science. One feature that many of them have in common is that they can't be efficiently solved. But there is an important type of problem, called a network flow problem, that can in fact be solved quite efficiently. Network flow asks how to most efficiently move "stuff" through a network, where "stuff" could be anything from packets on the Internet to materials on a road grid to an abstract notion of association.

The class will begin by defining network flow and discussing its applications. Then, we will talk about how to solve it! Algorithms covered for the basic maximum-flow problem may include the Ford-Fulkerson algorithm, the Edmonds-Karp algorithm, Dinic's algorithm, push-relabel methods, and further improvements to these approaches. The class may also cover related topics such as the max-flow min-cut theorem and minimum cost flows.

This is an awful lot to digest at once, so the class has been split into two parts, with a break between them. I will structure the class so that you can attend only Part 1 and still understand what network flow is and some ways (though not the most efficient) to solve it.

Also, note the use of "may" in the above. The exact topics covered are likely to change depending on your interests.


Prerequisites
This class is primarily focused on the rigorous analysis of algorithms. Thus, it is essential that you really understand what an algorithm is. This probably means that you should have some experience with programming. Some familiarity with graph theory could come in handy, but is by no means essential. It is also important that you are comfortable with mathematical proofs and in general enjoy logical and mathematical reasoning. However, this class will not use calculus, or any other math beyond the level of high-school algebra (it may, however, use math in a more sophisticated and interesting way than you are used to). Note that you can attend Part 1 and not Part 2, but the reverse is not recommended.

C4262: Exploring Cellular Automata Full!
Teachers: Jayson Lynch

Have you heard of Conway’s Game of Life? What about Brian’s Brain, Rule 30, or van Neumann Universal Constructor? Come explore these fascinating models which exhibit complex behavior from relatively simple rules. We’ll spend time examining different types of Cellular Automata, altering the underlying rules to see what happens, and discussing some of the theory or application behind these models.

C4293: The Internet and Computer Networks Full!
Teachers: J.D. Zamfirescu

Do you consider yourself 1337-in-training and want to know more about how the Internet works?

Come learn about TCP/IP and many of the protocols that make up the Internet, including HTTP (for the web), SMTP (sending email), and POP (receiving email). You’ll also learn how the Internet is laid out, why the speed of light matters, how your data packets get to Japan or Australia, and why sending email or IMs is like sending a message on a postcard!

C4390: The Singularity

The concept of a technological singularity, originally proposed by legendary genius John von Neumann in 1958, reached the mainstream this year when it formed a major plot point in an episode of a prime-time CBS sitcom. Many popular news stories have been published about the Singularity concept, and its most prominent proponent, Ray Kurzweil, but most fail to capture the subtleties of the idea. If you're wondering what the Singularity is, or why "otherwise smart people" believe it's going to happen, come to this class and I will attempt to explain. (I will be showing Ray Kurzweil's personal slideshow on the topic as per usual, but in past iterations, the most interesting portion of the class is the question-and-answer session.)


Prerequisites
An interest in the subject and an open mind

C4152: Amazing Algorithms - Network Flow Part 2
Difficulty: Hard - This class may be exceptionally difficult
Teachers: Michael Cohen

There are tons of different optimization problems out there in computer science. One feature that many of them have in common is that they can't be efficiently solved. But there is an important type of problem, called a network flow problem, that can in fact be solved quite efficiently. Network flow asks how to most efficiently move "stuff" through a network, where "stuff" could be anything from packets on the Internet to materials on a road grid to an abstract notion of association.

The class will begin by defining network flow and discussing its applications. Then, we will talk about how to solve it! Algorithms covered for the basic maximum-flow problem may include the Ford-Fulkerson algorithm, the Edmonds-Karp algorithm, Dinic's algorithm, push-relabel methods, and further improvements to these approaches. The class may also cover related topics such as the max-flow min-cut theorem and minimum cost flows.

This is an awful lot to digest at once, so the class has been split into two parts, with a break between them. I will structure the class so that you can attend only Part 1 and still understand what network flow is and some ways (though not the most efficient) to solve it.

Also, note the use of "may" in the above. The exact topics covered are likely to change depending on your interests.


Prerequisites
This class is primarily focused on the rigorous analysis of algorithms. Thus, it is essential that you really understand what an algorithm is. This probably means that you should have some experience with programming. Some familiarity with graph theory could come in handy, but is by no means essential. It is also important that you are comfortable with mathematical proofs and in general enjoy logical and mathematical reasoning. However, this class will not use calculus, or any other math beyond the level of high-school algebra (it may, however, use math in a more sophisticated and interesting way than you are used to). Note that you can attend Part 1 and not Part 2, but the reverse is not recommended.

C4116: An Inappropriately Fast Introduction to (a certain type of) Quantum Computers
Teachers: George Hansel

...exactly what it sounds like. We will, with your gracious assistance, attempt to cover:
- two-state systems
- a bit of linear algebra
- Kronecker products and entangled states
- classical logic and information theory
- quantum logic and information
- hardness of problems and decidability
- funny results of change of basis (quantum communication)
- Some notorious quantum algorithm



Prerequisites
Multiplying numbers.

C4362: Tricks with the Memory Management Unit

The Memory Management Unit of a CPU has the seemingly boring role of converting linear addresses, used in software, to the physical addresses used by the actual memory chips. The MMU is key to much of the functionality of the operating system, though. The MMU makes possible swap and direct memory access to files; helps enforce the user-mode/kernel-mode distinction; and keeps processes separated from each other.

We'll go over what exactly the MMU does, and how it is used to implement this sort of functionality.

C3980: Bit Hacks Full!
Teachers: Sherry Wu

Interested in computer science? Think you can't do much with 1s and 0s? Come to Bit Hacks to learn about the power of binary numbers.


Prerequisites
Basic programming experience, a little experience with binary or hexadecimal numbers

C4307: Parallel Programming from the Hardware Up
Difficulty: Hard - This class may be exceptionally difficult
Teachers: Dan Noe

We now live in a world of multithreaded programs, dual and quad core CPUs, and increasingly parallel programming. Moore’s law no longer scales “up” it scales “out.” Understanding concurrency and parallel programming will be crucial to the next generation of software engineers.

In this course I will discuss the reasons why parallelism is the direction of computing performance, how computer software and operation systems handle simultaneously shared resources, and how computer hardware is designed to facilitate synchronization (including “memory barriers” and cache synchronization) and resource sharing.


Prerequisites
Familiarity with a particular programming language is not required but you should probably have some experience with C, C++, Java, Python or other similar language with threading support. Examples will be generic. You should have a basic familiarity with how a typical computer works including the roles of the CPU and memory (RAM), and how the CPU executes instructions.

C4275: Introduction to Algorithms: Searching and Sorting

Algorithms drive most of the technology we see today: Google search and Google maps, Facebook, and Amazon.com all have algorithms tightly woven into their software.

This class will be a quick introduction to algorithms. An algorithm is a procedure for accomplishing some task, usually with efficiency as a goal, and oftentimes implemented on a computer. We will lay the foundations for constructing and analyzing algorithms, using the examples of sorting a list of numbers and finding a number in a list.


Prerequisites
Enough math to know what a logarithm is. If you already know what merge sort, quick sort, heap sort, and binary search are, then this class is not for you. Instead, you should look at Graph Algorithms, Data Structures, Randomized Algorithms, or Streaming Algorithms.

C3884: Genetic Algorithms: Making Data Reproduce
Teachers: Dustin Katzin

You know how you inherited traits from your mom and dad. Learn how data can reproduce and pass down traits through generations. We'll learn how "survival of the fittest" can be applied to ensure that we get the best data after running the algorithm. Finally, we will apply this to Tetris!


Prerequisites
basic knowledge of genetics, any biology class will work. basic knowledge of programming

C4345: Math on the T Full!
Teachers: Jacob Hurwitz

You probably walk by subway route maps every day without even bothering to glance at them. Unbeknownst to you, maps like these form the basis for the rich mathematical field of graph theory. In this class, we will introduce graph theory and a few useful algorithms. It is recommended that you ride the T home from Splash - so, you know, you can do some "math on the T."


Prerequisites
There are no prerequisites, but it is strongly advised that you be able to think logically. In fact, if you know what graph theory is, you might find this class to be too simple. (And when I say graph, I don’t mean the y=x^2 kind.)

C3975: Introduction to Computer Science and Programming
Teachers: Francis Plaza

This class is designed to introduce the fundamentals of computer science to students with little or no programming experience. We will start talking about computational techniques to solve problems and understand the way computer scientists think. We will spend the rest of the class creating simple programs. This class will use Python programming language. More information about Python is available at http://python.org


Prerequisites
Interest in computers and programming. No previous programming experience is necessary.

C4443: Become an Animator! Because life is no fun when you're 2D AND stuck in the same position.
Teachers: Ramya Swamy

Ever wondered how cartoons are made? Ever wanted to learn how to ANIMATE things? Breathe some life into your drawings! Learn how to use the same software professionals use (Adobe Flash) to create a small animation of your own. We'll discuss animation techniques (both 2D AND 3D) and look at some examples of the unlimited diversity of things you can make using this new skill. This course will go pretty rapidly (but don't let that deter you) so come with a crazy awesome DESIRE TO LEARN :D


Prerequisites
Be comfortable drawing with a mouse...Other than that, no experience is necessary~~! Sign up. You know you want to.

C4348: Think Like a Computer Full!
Teachers: Jacob Hurwitz

Want to think like a computer? Through several hands-on activities, we’ll discover how (basically) a computer thinks. In the process, we’ll introduce many concepts used in computer programming. You won’t learn how to program, but you will learn the core ideas common to most programming languages. Hopefully, you’ll leave with the motivation to pick up programming on your own!


Prerequisites
A desire to get out of your seat and have fun.

C4372: Using the command line to program awesome!

printf("Ever wanted to learn how to program?");
if (your_answer == "yes")
printf("Awesome! Take my class, and learn how to program in C");
if(your_answer == "no")
printf("What?! Why not?!?!!!!");
/*
This is a class for students with none or little programming experience, or who know other programming languages but want to learn the C language. We'll have lots of fun writing and running cool programs in the command line (a text-only interface to interact directly with your operating system), and you'll learn a lifelong skill in the process.
*/


Prerequisites
None! Beginners are welcome and encouraged to register.

C4277: Graph Algorithms

Have you ever wondered how Google maps works? In this class we will go over the theory behind it, developing a fast way of finding the shortest path from A to B.


Prerequisites
You should be familiar with the basics of algorithms, such as merge sort, heaps, and binary search. The Splash class "Introduction to Algorithms: Sorting and Searching" will cover all necessary prerequisites.

C4217: Computer Architecture in One Sitting.
Teachers: Ariel Wexler

I'm pretty sure everyone here uses computers on a daily basis. A computer could be in the form of a phone, or a laptop, or a remote control, or just about anything electronic nowadays... But you may be wondering what the heck is going on inside these microscopic devices? Well, that's why I'm here. I'm going to explain to you WHAT computation is, and HOW you can design a computer (from step one just about). Also, if I do my job right, you will walk out of the classroom thinking about everything you see in an amazingly new fashion!


Prerequisites
No real prerequisites. However, if you know something about binary numbering systems that is helpful.

C4052: Streaming Algorithms
Difficulty: Hard - This class may be exceptionally difficult

Imagine you have one normal-sized sheet of scratch paper to write on and a list of a million numbers. You read the list, making notes on your scratch paper as you go. Afterwards, someone asks "How many times did 1134547 appear in that list?" You look at your scratch paper and respond, "Between 15000 and 16000 times," and you are right. How can this be possible? You have kept track approximately of millions of things while only writing down thousands of digits. Programs which try to extract conclusions from huge quantities of data on the internet find themselves in scaled-up versions of this same situation. The volume of data being continually presented swamps the available memory, requiring new algorithmic ideas. We will discuss some of the problems and solutions in this field.

C4134: Karel the Robot teaches Java Programming Full!
Teachers: Tiffany Tang

Want to learn Java Programming, but in a cute, cuddly way? Before jumping off to the world of code and black text, consider exploring Karel, a robot, and Karel's world, a 2-d grid. It's fun, and you get to learn!

In this class, students will explore the fundamentals of computer programming through a more visual basis. This class will cover basic concepts like loops, recursion, and methods. Students will be able to control Karel by writing their own code.

Class will include challenges on how to help Karel achieve certain goals (by which YOU will be writing code for). Have fun!

Note: This is NOT Karel Programming, which is an educational programming language.


Prerequisites
Beginner's level

C3876: Make Your Own Website! (Introduction to web design using HTML) Full!
Teachers: Abhishek Nagaraj

Have you always wanted your own webpage? Where you can put cool stuff about yourself? Where you can share pictures, paintings, stories? Then this is the place! We will make webpages with HTML and upload them so that the whole world can see them!


Prerequisites
You should know how to use a computer. That's about it!

C4279: Data Structures

How can computers efficiently manage large amounts of data? In this class, we will answer this question. Learn how to quickly look up a name in a database and how to determine how much of your data lies in a given range. As a bonus, we will develop an efficient algorithm for string matching (a string is a sequence of characters or numbers).


Prerequisites
You should be familiar with the basics of algorithms, such as merge sort, heaps, and binary search. The Splash class "Introduction to Algorithms: Sorting and Searching" will cover all necessary prerequisites.

C4235: The Architecture of Microsoft Windows

Why is your PC so awesome? Perhaps because it runs Windows! This course provides a survey of the architecture of Microsoft Windows with an emphasis on the features and design decisions that directly affect the security, reliability, and performance of the operating system.


Prerequisites
Interest in computers.

C4335: Randomized Algorithms Full!
Difficulty: Hard - This class may be exceptionally difficult

Is it okay if an algorithm works 'almost all' the time? In this class, we'll see how computers can use randomness to run faster. We'll give randomized algorithms for finding medians, for testing if a number is prime, and for finding structures in graphs. Along the way, we'll prove that the probability that our algorithms fail is less than the probability that the computer spontaneously bursts into flames.


Prerequisites
Know how merge sort works or take Introduction to Algorithms. Some knowledge of probability.

C4269: Introduction to Python Full!
Teachers: Benjamin Agre

A short 2 hour introduction to python with some hands on activities. This will assume you have no background in computer science and no background in programming. We'll cover basics, have you do some simple exercises and just learn some python.
Also remember children
http://xkcd.com/519/


Prerequisites
Have some idea what a computer is, maybe some idea about how it works

C4187: Programming and Debugging Workshop Full!

Come with your partly working projects, crazy ideas, language frustrations, cool demos, whatever. I might not have heard of the language you're using, but I can try to help you think clearly about debugging or crafting code. Or we can just sit around and talk about programming. It's okay to be a geek.


Prerequisites
Try telling a computer what to do. Fail at least once. That should suffice.

C4427: Alice - 3D Computer Animation Full!
Teachers: Michelle Ng

Alice is an innovative 3D programming environment that makes it easy to create an animation for telling a story, playing an interactive game, or a video to share on the web.

For this course, we will be using Alice as a learning tool for introductory computer programming. The 3D graphics and a drag-and-drop interface makes it easy to learn and facilitate a more engaging experience for students with no programming background. We will begin with the navigation of the Alice tool and the basic steps in creating an animation - storyboard, character (objects), actions (methods). We will also learn about fundamental programming concepts such as class, object, parameter, if/else, loop, etc. The final hour of the course will be devoted for an “animation-hour” to encourage students to apply their new skills to create their own animation programs using Alice.

The Alice software is developed by Carnegie Mellon University and can be downloaded for free (http://www.alice.org).


Prerequisites
Love for imagination and storytelling... (no previous programming experience is necessary). Please bring a USB 2.0 key drive (512MB minimum) with you if you wish to save your animation files during class.

C4326: Become an Animator! Because life is no fun when you're 2D AND stuck in the same position.
Teachers: Ramya Swamy

Ever wondered how cartoons are made? Ever wanted to learn how to ANIMATE things?? Breathe some life into your drawings! Learn how to use the same software professionals use (Adobe Flash) to create a small animation of your own. We'll discuss animation techniques (both 2D AND 3D) and look at some examples of the unlimited diversity of things you can make using this new skill. This course will go pretty rapidly (but don't let that deter you) so come with a crazy awesome DESIRE TO LEARN :D


Prerequisites
Be comfortable drawing with a mouse...Other than that, no experience is necessary~~! Sign up. You know you want to.

C3862: Promiscuous Mode: Network Protocol Analysis
Teachers: Harvey Yee

Do you want to be in Promiscuous mode(Monitor Mode)? You may if you are a network engineer. Join us in learning what is involved in Network Protocol analysis, and along the way learn about network architecture and protocols. Depending on what is available in the class room, a demonstration of a wired or wireless network session will be provided. A free copy of Linux LiveCD will be provided so that you can continue your learning of network protocol analysis after this class.
Newly added based on popular demand is a demo of a router operation.



Prerequisites
A sense of curiosity, adventure, and fun!

C4103: Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming in Java
Teachers: Stephen Poletto

In this class, we will explore object-oriented programming, using Java as the language of study. This class assumes no prior experience with programming. Students will learn what objects are and how to design programs using them. We will consider simple programs to start and move on to more advanced topics like inheritance and polymorphism. Because of the limited time constraint, this class will move quickly.


Prerequisites
No prerequisites.

C3835: Intro to the Command Prompt for Girls (and Boys) Full!
Teachers: Ruth Byers

Not very many girls know how to fix their computers when things go wrong- but they can, and learning to use the command prompt is the first step! The command prompt is the knife you use to open up a computer and spill its digital innards onto your screen. Come learn to wield that knife and use it to enter and explore parts of your computer you've never even knew were there. Boys also welcome.

C4077: Pointers on pointers!
Teachers: Cam Tenny

These aren't your daddy's pointers! Well, actually, they are. First, learn about good memory management practices in C and C++ so that you don't poke any eyes out. Then learn how to do cool things in C with pointers, like state machines and stack traces. Bringing a computer is recommended but by no means required.


Prerequisites
A minimal knowledge of C or C++ is desirable, although experience with other programming languages is acceptable instead. Be ready for small challenges.

C3961: The Languages of the Internet Full!

Just like humans speak to each other to communicate, so do web browsers, mail clients, and pretty much any piece of software that uses the internet. Many of the protocols they use to communicate are in plaintext and are human readable, meaning that you can understand and speak them directly.

Learn to craft email from arbitrary addresses while speaking SMTP, or send crafted requests to webpages while speaking HTTP. This class will both show you what is happening under the hood in software you use every day, as well as give you an understanding of what parts of a protocol you can trust and what can be forged.


Prerequisites
You must have sent emails in the past and viewed webpages. Previous use of an instant message client is recommended but not strictly necessary.

C3907: Artificial Intelligence: When will THEY be smarter than us?
Difficulty: Easy - This class is meant to be accessible to most students
Teachers: Bob Weinberg

From its early beginnings a half century ago, giant leaps have been made in the field of artificial intelligence (AI).

Early programs often mimicked the thought processes of their programmer. Whether it was a computer playing chess against a person, a computer holding a conversation with a person via the CRT screen, or a program attempting to diagnose psychological problems, it was usually fairly easy to figure out that a computer was at work.

Now Expert Systems can solve complex engineering and scientific problems much faster than the average engineer or scientist.

Robotics has made great advances in the manufacturing field. Virtual Reality has allowed the players to enter exotic and faraway places.

And whether talking about surrogate robots or robotic androids, we all are familiar with the idea of machine becoming friend and ally to man, as well as companion and advisor.

This course will make a survey of AI over the past century, and take a glimpse at where it is going.

The inventor Ray Kurzweil and the computer whiz Mitch Kapoor made a $20 million dollar bet whether robotic intelligence will surpass human intelligence in the next 20 years. Who will win?


Prerequisites
none

C4039: Intro to Complexity Theory
Teachers: Louis Wasserman

What is the mysterious traveling salesman problem, and why does it strike fear into the hearts of programmers? What does number theory have to do with the NSA, and why is it safe to send your credit card number to Paypal? Why is it called "Department of Computer Science & Applied Theology?"


Prerequisites
If you've written a program for any platform, it'd help significantly.

C4038: Androids, Handbells, Rock Band, and Scheme
Teachers: Jonathan Sailor

What the heck?

In this course, we'll use a Scheme-ish language to program Android phones to act like handbells, and play songs with them.

You won't write a traditional smartphone program, but we'll talk a little about smartphone programming concepts and challenges, and you'll get to use literally cutting-edge research code.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WMYLJUKMPbA


Prerequisites
Programming knowledge. Familiarity with Scheme or other FP languages a plus.

C4306: Reaching down to the Operating System Kernel
Difficulty: Hard - This class may be exceptionally difficult
Teachers: Dan Noe

What does a computer operating system kernel (core) do? In the most basic sense, it is a special program that manages shared resources by virtualizing them. In a typical computer, the operating system provides access to resources like the CPU, memory, hard disk and other hardware devices.

Each task running on the operating system runs as if it is in its own virtual container, as if it has its own CPU and memory. Programs running in unprivileged mode are prevented from interfering with others. How does the OS kernel accomplish this? How does the hardware support the OS kernel? We’ll discuss how, using generic examples.

We’ll also look at some easy, generic examples of how files are stored on disk and discuss some of the differences between modern operating systems like Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X.


Prerequisites
I won't be using any particular programming language to demonstrate concepts. Examples might include "pseudocode" but this course is largely conceptual so there will not be much. You should be conceptually familiar with the hardware components of a basic computer including how the CPU, memory (RAM), and disk fit together. A basic understanding of how CPU instructions work is assumed.

C3720: Modern Cryptography
Teachers: Sweet Tea Dorminy

Ever wanted to know how banks, the government, etc. can keep a drive’s contents from being read, even if someone steals the hard drive? Or how to generate numbers that appear random without actually creating random numbers? Enter cryptography, the study of keeping secrets.

We’ll be running over basic principles of modern (symmetric) cryptography, discussing:
What does it mean for an encryption algorithm to be secure? (common attack methods, random output)
What do we do with an encryption algorithm? (hash functions, pseudo-random number generators, block cipher modes)
What do modern symmetric encryption algorithms look like? (DES, AES)

Note that this course specifically does not cover RSA or any other asymmetric cryptography.



Prerequisites
Some familiarity with basic group theory is helpful for understanding the math behind DES/AES. Some familiarity with the difference between pseudorandomness and true randomness would also be helpful.

C4247: Unix is your friend (Or, how I stopped worrying and learned to love the command line) Full!
Teachers: Andrew Farrell

Linux and Mac OS are both based on Unix and we'll show you a bit about how they are structured, how to start using the command line, how to configure things, and how to write short scripts to automate things you do all the time.

C3900: Programming Skills for the Future
Teachers: Thomas Murphy

Most computer programmers like to say how different and special their favorite language is. Underneath, though, almost all modern languages require similar ways of thinking about problems. Modern hardware (especially multicore and distributed computing) is starting to demand a new set of tools, and programmers will have to bend their brains further.

We'll start from the ground up with Haskell and Erlang, and learn about functional purity, typeclasses, transactional memory, the dreaded Monad, and much more.


Prerequisites
None! You may have never, ever, ever programmed before.

C4366: Optimizing graph-search run times, with applications to Cambridge
Difficulty: Hard - This class may be exceptionally difficult

Graphs are a ubiquitous formalism in computer science and beyond. In particular, rapid graph search is a classic problem for computer science. In addition, rapid locomotion is a classic problem for humans. Coincidence? We think not.
Under the guidance of seasoned MIT trackmen, you'll run into Cambridge, then explore a variety of search algorithms as we navigate our way back to MIT, where post-run bananas and chocolate milk will be waiting. Total mileage will be around five.


Prerequisites
Any of the following: Men: 100m: 9.92 s 200m: 22.06 s 400: 50 s 800m: 2:10 1600m: 4:59 3200m: 10:40 2k or 3k steeplechase: completion 5k: 19:00.03 1600m racewalk: 5:59 Women: 100m: 11.03 s 200m: 23.5 s 400: 56 s 800m: 2:30 1600m: 5:59 3200m: 13:00 2k or 3k steeplechase: completion 5k: 21:46.35 1600m racewalk: 6:59 [Note: All times FAT; please add .24 seconds to convert from hand-timed performances. First-leg relay times will be accepted; other relay times may be considered in exceptional cases.]

C3715: Beginner's Cryptography
Teachers: Amber Bennoui

1205011814 081523 2015 051403150405 011404 040503150405 1305191901070519! (Learn how to encode and decode messages!)

C3840: Circuits: logic gates, Karnaugh maps and the quest for truth tables
Teachers: Andrea Lincoln

We begin our journey with transistors. From these transistors we build logic gates (NOT, OR, AND, XOR, etc). From these logic gates we build circuits. We use Karnaugh maps to go from a truth table to a circuit.


Prerequisites
Math: Algebra, an understanding of logic (for example True and False = False, True or False = True). Physics/Circuits: knowledge of voltage, current and resistance

C4210: Sort Yourselves

The modern world is all about data - data in databases, data in lists, data in Google, data on your computer. But with all this data, we have to know how to use it. One of most fundamental ways to use data is to sort it. This class will explore various sorting algorithms - we'll even sort in $$O(n)$$ time! Impossible you say? Well, I say you're wrong.


Prerequisites
Should be comfortable with big-Oh notation, as I will only briefly describe it.

C4271: Introduction to Programmatic Debugging Full!
Difficulty: Hard - This class may be exceptionally difficult
Teachers: Benjamin Agre

So you've messed around with a computer, you might have started tearing it apart, hell you might even have some idea how things work. Well this is going to teach you how to programmatically debug programs, to reason about what they're doing, how they're doing it.
We'll show you how some well known pieces of software work, as well as some things about plugin writing for VDB.
There will be a brief refresher on assembly at the beginning of the class. There will also be a brief introduction to vtrace framework.


Prerequisites
You should have some idea how your computer works. Some python (preferably python), or other programming language experience required. Preferably know what assembly is

C4189: File systems for Linux
Teachers: Mohan Chinnappan

Topics covered in the course:
1. Linux operating system fundamentals
2. File systems in general
3. Linux file systems
4. Ext2 file system
5. Ext3 file system
6. Ext4 file system
7. Status of Linux's new file system: Btrfs
8. ZFS and the future of file systems



Prerequisites
Eager to know about computer operating systems and how the data is stored in the computer systems.

C4102: Programming for Sound: Real-Time Audio Processing with MaxMSP
Teachers: Stephen Poletto

In this course, we'll take a look at MaxMSP, a visual programming environment used for real-time digital signal processing. Max programs are made by arranging and connecting simple objects, each of which performs a specific function. These objects are combined in a data-flow system within a visual canvas. By mapping data from external controllers (video game controllers, iPhone, midi controllers, etc.) the performer can process and sequence live audio to create an interactive musical performance.


Prerequisites
No prerequisites.

C3991: Haskell, Hands-On Full!
Teachers: Thomas Murphy

Whether or not you've ever programmed before, if you want to learn Haskell, and you like to learn things by trying them, instead of hearing about them, come join us! We'll play with as much code as we can in 50 minutes.

Haskell is an incredible, fast, elegant, full-featured language. It's been used by academics for over 20 years, and has only recently started being used by major companies and "regular people."

Haskell is a pure functional language. These languages make you think differently about almost every programming skill you have. People who've never programmed before might even have an easier time getting used to it.

For the challenges you face, pure functional languages reward you with clearer code, fewer bugs, and almost unbeatable performance (especially on modern, multicore computers).


Prerequisites
Ability to use a computer. No programming experience necessary.

C3730: Intro to Movie Making Closed!
Teachers: Christopher Kelly

This class will be focused on learning the basic skills to make an effective movie using the software Microsoft Movie Maker. Students will learn the fundamental keys to movie-making, the shortcuts to making beautiful films, and much more!


Prerequisites
None, except a love for film!

C4172: Easy Video Game Design and Programming!
Teachers: Daniel Gonzalez

This class will teach students VERY basic video game programming and design, with little to no coding, using a program called Game Maker. We will work on and complete a very basic game. Then we will expand on different concepts such as user control, simple artificial intelligence, physics, etc.


Prerequisites
-Programming experience: None! Absolutely no programming experience is necessary, just the will to learn. -Mathematics: Algebra 1


Engineering

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E3724: Introduction to Circuits Full!
Difficulty: Hard - This class may be exceptionally difficult
Teachers: Ky-Anh Tran

Have you ever wondered how a radio works? How AM modulation works? What happens when you tune a radio? Then this is the class you should take.

Starting with the basics of circuit analysis (Ohm's law, Kirchoff voltage and current), we will try to derive or heuristically understand the basic theorems of circuit analysis: Thevenin, Norton Equivalent circuit, Superposition principle, and impedance analysis.

We will then delve into an analysis of practical and useful circuits, low pass/high pass/bandpass filters, and circuits inside our radio.


Prerequisites
Solid knowledge of precalculus and/or algebra. knowledge of complex numbers is helpful. Previous physics class covering circuits will be extremely helpful as the class is fast paced.

E4304: Duct Tape and Zipties Engineering Full!
Difficulty: Easy - This class is meant to be accessible to most students
Teachers: Vincent Lee

You only need two things to build any structure:
Duct Tape
Zipties

GO!

E4063: Bridge Building

We will break into small groups, with an undergrad leading each group to build the strongest possible bridge (it'll be a competition to make things more fun!). We will use simple everyday materials to build bridges of certain prescribed dimensions. The one who holds the most weight, will win a prize!


Prerequisites
Creativity and group cooperation

E3901: Electronics with Theory Full!
Difficulty: Hard - This class may be exceptionally difficult
Teachers: Eric Van Albert

Learn electrical theory. Start out with Ohm's law, but finish with enough knowledge to build a computer from scratch. This intense lecture covers analog circuitry in the first hour, and digital circuitry in the second hour. No matter how much you think you know about electronics, you will learn something new.


Prerequisites
Algebra I. Algebra II recommended. Calculus and differential equations would be useful, but are by no means required.

E4129: The History of Space Flight
Teachers: Samantha Marquart

From Sputnik to the Space Shuttle and everything in between.... what we did and when ...and why... and where we're going!


Prerequisites
a love for NASA, space flight, and more!

E4218: Take stuff apart! Full!

Ever wonder what the inside of a computer looks like? What about a blender? We'll bring in a bunch of random devices people use and a bunch of screwdrivers -- you get to take them apart!


Prerequisites
This course is intended to get people interested in how stuff works. If you take stuff apart all the time, that's wonderful, but this class may not be for you.

E4040: Engineering Improv

Like building things? Like Improv? During this hour you will work with your team to try to build the best solution to a problem that you will be given at the beginning of class.


Prerequisites
Willingness to work as a team.

E3865: Sensational Failures in Engineering
Teachers: Liza Plotnikov

Exploding space shuttles, collapsing bridges, exploding naval guns… sometimes designs fail, and sometimes they fail catastrophically. These failures can be dramatic, deadly, or sometimes just plain silly, but they have one thing in common: they are all preventable. In this class we'll cover the technical missteps behind some famous engineering disasters (and some you may never have heard of). We'll talk about how smart people can make bad designs, the importance of communication, and especially the value of common sense.

E3832: Guitar Hero Modding/Workshop
Teachers: Joseph Lodin

Are you a Guitar Hero? Like, for reals?

Or are you just SO CLOSE to beating Raining Blood on expert, when suddenly, your blue button stops working during that LAST trill? You are not alone. In fact, did you know that one in every three Guitar Hero Les Paul wireless controllers has the same fundamental problem?

In this class, we'll be opening up some Guitar Hero controllers, learning how to fix some common problems, and possibly covering the basics of further modding.

If you have a controller,broken or otherwise, feel free to bring it! It's no fun when everyone's sitting over the same controller! If it's an Xbox360 controller, we can *probably* test it, too!


Prerequisites
Basic knowledge of Guitar Hero is assumed, but expertise at the game is not required. This is a LOW-LEVEL modding workshop! I don't know how to solder (yet), so keep in mind that we'll be doing low-tech fixes. If you want ideas/suggestions for more involved mods/fixes, we can go over those in theory, but we won't have the tools necessary.

E3899: Intro to Chemical Engineering
Teachers: Lonna Gordon

Where do physics, mathematics, and chemistry come together as a logic puzzle? In chemical engineering.

Chemical engineers are the people behind everything. From canned soup to medicine to cleaning up oil spills, chemical engineers design the process to make it happen.

Use science, math, and chemical engineering principles to design a process to produce jam, artificial lungs, or clean up pollution.

New this year: design a distillation column and separation process and learn about the career potential in one of the highest paid engineering professions.


Prerequisites
Some basic idea of what calculus is used for and the notation would help, but isn't necessary. Bring a calculator, a pencil, and a straight edge.

E4171: Solar Cells and the Energy Challenge
Teachers: Burhan Saifaddin

The sun is the major energy source on Earth. Photovoltaics (Solar Cells) could help the world reduced its carbon emissions, improve its energy security and economical well-being. Come to learn how solar cells work and to learn about some of the major problems facing the Solar Cells industry.

E4216: Toilets! Full!

Toilets are one of the best examples of purely mechanical systems that are everywhere and easy to open up and figure out. In this class, we'll do just that: open up a toilet and try to figure out how it works. Not only will you get the experience of figuring something out, but you can take home your new knowledge and fix your own plumbing!


Prerequisites
Interest in figuring stuff out. This class is more intended toward people who have not had as much experience taking apart random things -- if you have, go home and do it yourself!

E3843: University and Enterprise Physical Security

Lots of people teach "information security", but far fewer research and discuss physical security in large-scale networks, including university environments. There are many ways to own a campus, and given the time we have, we'll address as many as we can.


The goal of the course is to give you a nuanced view of physical security, including movement sensors, magnetic and RFID card readers, and master-keyed physical lock systems. We will also discuss the social implication of the use and abuse of these systems.



Prerequisites
Some knowledge of mechanical and electrical engineering. You should know how a cam works and what digital logic is.

E4097: Introduction to Synthetic Biology
Teachers: Grant Robinson

Have you ever wondered if life really has meaning? Is there something missing from your world that you just can't put your finger on? Well, worry no more- synthetic biology is the answer to all your problems. In this two hour course, we will explain not only what synthetic biology is, but how you could one day use its principles to change the world (or at least make genetic circuits that do remarkable things).


Prerequisites
An interest in not only understanding (cool) biology, but in learning how to hack it.

E3929: Rocket/Composites Design and Fabrication Class

Ever want to learn how rockets are designed and built? How about how to use composite materials, which if used properly, can have significant benefits over traditional materials, such as metals. This class will discuss how rockets work and what goes into the design of a rocket. Then it will discuss how composites are generally fabricated and students will get a chance to make their own rocket fins out of composite materials.


Prerequisites
none

E4322: Introduction to Probabilistic Robotics and Bayesian Inference
Teachers: David Rosen

From outer space to abandoned mines to urban disaster areas, robotic agents are at the forefront of exploration in hostile environments. To successfully complete these missions, a robot must be able to operate for extended periods of time with little or no input from human controllers; this includes the ability to gracefully handle uncertainty and error.

In this class, we'll see how to use the theory of probability to build robots that are better, smarter, and more resistant to uncertainty and error, with a heavy emphasis on real-world examples (e.g., rockets, self-driving cars, rescue robots, and perhaps a submarine or two).


Prerequisites
This class will have some math in it. Familiarity with calculus and probability would be helpful, but are certainly not required (we’ll cover the stuff you need to know). The most important prerequisites are a desire to learn, and a high tolerance for AWESOME!

E4259: Introduction to Amateur Radio
Difficulty: Easy - This class is meant to be accessible to most students
Teachers: Melissa Hunt

Come learn about ham radio! This class will review the basics to radio circuitry and operation, as well as how to get licensed and get involved with this nifty hobby.


Prerequisites
None

E4374: Lightning Crystals! Building Piezoelectric Sensors
Teachers: Benjamin Sena

What are piezo electric transducers? Most simply they are parallel plate capacitors with dielectric, but they are made of awesome and can directly convert mechanical stresses to electrical signals, which means you can make great contact microphones for amplifying all sorts of things. Come see just how great they are!


Prerequisites
Some understanding of what electricity is.

E4123: Trusses
Teachers: Benjamin Sena

We will look at trusses, those geometric connections of rods and joints on things like bridges, why they are important, and how to understand and analyze them.


Prerequisites
At least basic physics is recommended, but I can try to bring you up to speed if are feeling a bit left in the dust.

E4015: Really, Really, Really, Really, Really, Really, Really, Really, Really Small Things: an Introduction to Nanotechnology Full!
Teachers: Liza Plotnikov

Let's say you have a brick of pure gold. What color do you think it would be? Probably yellow, right? Okay, let's say you take your brick of gold and cut in in half. Now what color is it? Probably still yellow, right? Alright, now what if you cut your brick of gold in half so many times that you wind up with a teensy piece that's only a couple hundred atoms across. Of course you'd find that its color is....red? Turns out that stuff tends to behave really weirdly when it's small. Why? Come find out.

E4205: How to Build A Satellite: Exploring Space Systems Design

Have you ever wondered what goes into building a satellite? Learn about satellite design and practice by designing and building your own satellite!

E4010: Bicycle Maintenance and Repair
Teachers: Edwin Perez-Clancy

Being able to maintain and repair your own bicycle is a useful skill that will save you money and time. I will cover the basics, including lubrication, brake replacement/adjustment, tube replacement, chain replacement, and wheel alignment. I will also describe the different types of bicycles and how to decide whether a bicycle in a particular price range is worthwhile or not.


Prerequisites
None.

E4111: Composite Structures and Design
Teachers: George Hansel

A brief introduction to various types of composite (think carbon fiber) structures, design, and fabrication, from a member of MIT's Solar Electric Vehicle Team.

We'll talk about how composites, from airplanes to cellos to skis, are built and when they fail - with demonstrations and tests to destruction.


E3853: Physical Security
Teachers: Eric Van Albert

Learn just how insecure the world around us is. Covers everything from social engineering to lock picking to RFID cards.

E4016: Aircraft Jet Engines
Teachers: Mayank Agarwal

Come find out how large and fast military jets and commercial airline are powered. There will be no equations or theory. Just conversations and class discussions.

This class was taught last year also 3 hrs, but this year it has been shortened to 2 hours.


Prerequisites
None

E3903: Principles of Surfboard Design Closed!
Teachers: Sho Sato

Would you like to learn how to design your own surfboard? I'll describe the entire surfboard-making process, from shape design to material selection to manufacturing. I will bring in some of my own boards.


Prerequisites
Some basic understanding of physics concepts, such as buoyancy, force, and density is sufficient.

E4090: Cool Tech for International Development
Teachers: Jessica Huang

Come learn about the interesting, challenging and important field of international development. We have made so much progress in the past few centuries, yet an estimated 4 billion people are still living under the equivalent of $3 a day - that's almost 2/3 of the world! What role can technology play in addressing this global challenge? We'll have an opportunity to play with some cool technologies that are out there, as well as build some of our own. Discover and unleash your inner creativity for a positive social impact!

E4022: Trains in Japan

How can a train levitate? Why is the Shinkansen the fastest commuter train on earth? If 30 million people take the Tokyo subway everyday, why is it still the most on time subway system in the world? In this class I'll introduce students to technology of Japan Railways. Topics covered will include the Tokyo Metro, the largest subway system in the world, the history of Japan Railways, Magnetic Levitation and applied Superconductivity, and how to read enough Japanese to find your way around Japan by train.


Prerequisites
None


Humanities

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H4177: Introductory Russian Full!
Difficulty: Hard - This class may be exceptionally difficult
Teachers: Pamela Alvarez

A basic introduction to the Russian language and the Cyrillic alphabet


Prerequisites
Prior study of a foreign language helpful, but not required

H4268: Reverse-Discovering the Arthurian Legend Full!
Teachers: Anne Cai

Through a brief literature survey of the numerous works, we will investigate the various portrayals of King Arthur, Guinevere, Lancelot, and the many other characters that compose the complex web of Camelot. From select poems, short stories, excerpts from novels, and parts of papers by Arthurian experts, we will reconstruct Camelot, a legend that has captured the imagination of so many writers and artists over the centuries.

H4405: Social Psychology Full!
Teachers: Josh Shaine

Why do people behave differently in groups than they do when alone? Why would a perfectly reasonable person agree to administer shocks to somebody just because that person got questions wrong? Does power corrupt and if so, how? Would you stop to help somebody in need?


Prerequisites
Willingness to question assumptions and your own thinking. Willingness to listen to others.

H4402: Where the Musical Scale Comes From Full!
Teachers: Rob Speer

Why does the musical scale we know consist of 12 notes, and why are they those notes in particular? It turns out that there’s some simple math that describes what sounds good to the human ear, and you can use that math to build up the familiar Western scale. Like curious engineers, we’re going to take apart the scale and see how it works — and then we’re going to put it back together differently.

By making different choices, you can end up building other musical scales used through history and around the world, or exotic scales that few people have ever heard. Instead of 12 notes, you could have 5, 19, 22, or even 53 notes in each octave.

You’ll hear some examples of music that doesn’t sound like anything you’ve heard before, learn why every piano is “out of tune” in one way or another, and you’ll even have the opportunity to play a keyboard with a 19-note scale.


Prerequisites
This class will make use of some math. You should understand how to multiply fractions and raise numbers to a power. If you are familiar with logarithms, you will get more out of the math. If you are familiar with musical intervals -- for example, what thirds and fifths sound like -- you will get more out of the music.

H3969: Glorious Music Full!
Teachers: Lance Ozier

Sure, you've heard of Beethoven and Bach. We'll start there, but move quickly to some of the most glorious classical music of the early 20th century, including pieces by Orff, Stravinsky, Ravel, Respighi, Gershwin, and Puccini.


Prerequisites
Interest in classical music.

H3996: Latin: The Direct Method
Teachers: Zachary Haney

"Arma virumque cano!" - I sing of war and a man! The Aeneid

By employing the Direct Method (also called the Natural Method) of Hans Oerberg's Lingua Latina, we will embark on the study of Latin. By using this method, we will see that one does not have to use English to understand Latin (nor any other foreign language!). By the end, we will have the opportunity to discuss later Latin and how to go about studying this language that lasted for almost 2,000 years (and developed into our modern Spanish, French, Italian, etc.)


Prerequisites
We will move rather quickly so as to learn some features of the language, so a knowledge of grammar is helpful but certainly not required.

H4197: How to Win Friends and Influence People Full!
Teachers: Christopher Luna

Learn simple, pragmatic techniques to apply in everyday life to gain more friends, to become an inspiring leader, a persuasive salesman, and all around more pleasant person to be around.


Prerequisites
None.

H3995: Suomen Kieli: Introduction to Finnish!
Teachers: Nora Räsänen

Finnish is one of the few languages in the unique Finno-Ugric language family, and only spoken by about 5 million people in the world. Come learn the basics of Finnish! By the end of the class, you'll be able to correctly pronounce Finnish words, introduce yourself, ask questions and count. If we have time, we will learn one children's song.


Prerequisites
None

H4287: Introduction To Hinduism

With nearly a billion adherents and dating back millennia, Hinduism is one of the world's largest and oldest religions. Western thinkers from Carl Jung to the Beatles have been profoundly influenced by its ancient philosophies. All are welcome to come explore and discuss the spiritual traditions of India.


Prerequisites
None

H4331: Prototyping Plots Full!

Interested in crafting stories but don't know where to start? Ever wondered what a monomyth is? Want to know what it's good for? And how many coincidences can you really get away with in a story, anyway? (It's two, by the way; come and hear why.) "Prototyping Plots" is a crash course in creating stories - looking at where ideas come from, making memorable characters, and crafting coherent plots. Come in with some ideas and leave with more!

H4201: Introduction to Bokononism Full!
Teachers: Ashley Villar

All the true things I am about to tell you are shameless lies.
Bokononism is the invented religion of Kurt Vonnegut from his world famous novel Cat’s Cradle. Together we will explore the scattered psalms and writings from the Books of Bokonon.
Believe in vin-dit; find your karass; come listen to the foma!


H4157: Feminist Theory for Dudes (or Women!)
Teachers: Colin McSwiggen

Feminist theory is a fascinating subject even if you're a dude, and your life will be better if you learn about it. Unfortunately, a lot of guys never study it, either because they don't feel comfortable in the spaces where feminism is taught, or because they think it has nothing to do with them. This course aims to fix both of those problems by teaching the basics of feminist thought in an explicitly male-friendly environment. Women are of course equally welcome. I'll talk about:

- What feminism is, how it works, and why it matters.
- A survey of key ideas in gender theory over the years.
- The social construction of gender and how masculinity makes life suck for men.
- Race, class, and intersectionality issues.
- Whatever you want to know more about!

I'd especially encourage you to take this class if you don't know much about feminism or are not totally comfortable with the idea. Be forewarned, however, that the class will not be an open debate (though questions are welcome), and trolling in particular will not be tolerated.


Prerequisites
An open mind. That's the only prerequisite, but it's very important.

H3951: Introduction to Game Theory Full!
Difficulty: Easy - This class is meant to be accessible to most students
Teachers: Zoe Thorkildsen

Come and meet Rose and Colin in a brief introduction to the field of game theory. You will learn how to read a payoff matrix for a non-zero sum game, how to find the Nash Equilibrium, and how game theory has been applied to real life. We will also simulate and discuss some of the more famous games: Prisoner’s Dilemma, Chicken, Battles of the Sexes, Stag Hunt, and more. If time permits, we will also discuss how game theory is used to model real life situations, and create our own models for a few recent international or domestic scenarios.

H4387: Lord of the Rings and Christianity
Teachers: Kristin Kuhn

J.R.R. Tolkien was a devout Catholic, and his writings are thoroughly drenched in his Christian worldview.

Come explore with me how Tolkien's faith comes through in his writings, and learn a new way to look at this incredible fantasy trilogy!


Prerequisites
Have read Lord of the Rings (doesn't need to be recent). Some knowledge of Christianity (so we can draw parallels without having to spend 30 minutes on the basics of Christianity!) An open and curious mind!

H4415: The History of Middle-Earth: the Valian Years
Teachers: Raisa Lardie

JRR Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings takes place fairly late in the overall timeline of Middle-Earth; what happened before that? Come learn about the rich history of Arda as we follow the events that ultimately led to Biblo Baggin's discovery of the One Ring.

Part one in a three-class series, we will be learning about the Valar and the Shaping of Middle-Earth, Melkor's betrayal and the subsequent First War amongst the Valar, and other important events that form the foundation of Middle-Earth and pave the way for The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings.


Prerequisites
Familiarity with the Silmarillion is helpful but not required, as we will be covering this material in class. An extensive knowledge of the history of Middle-Earth only means that you will be terribly bored.

H4125: Star Trek and the 1960s Full!
Teachers: Elizabeth Attaway

Remember that episode with the space hippies? Yes? How about the one where Kirk starts the Vietnam War on the planet Neural? I didn't think so. We'll talk about how Star Trek: The Original Series reflected issues of the 60s, and maybe even discuss the movies a little. Not to mention you'll get to hear William Shatner recite the Preamble to the Constitution (We..........the PEEEEOPLE!)


Prerequisites
Knowing at least a bit about Star Trek: TOS would make the class that much more enjoyable for you, but initiates into the world of Trek fandom are equally welcome.

H4061: Canada, and why you shouldn't live there
Difficulty: Easy - This class is meant to be accessible to most students

Canada, eh?


Prerequisites
You must never have been to Canada, or anywhere near it.

H4261: Major Social Injustices Around Us and How to Make a Difference
Teachers: Giana Castorani

Do you have a desire to change the world? Do you know how many terrible violations of basic human rights are going on in this world? What about in this country? This city? Learn about true stories of people like you in peril and how we can help them and make their lives a little brighter. We are all human, and when some of us are not treated as such, we must step in however we can.


Prerequisites
A heart

H4399: Metered Poetry: Impress your friends with potent speech Full!
Teachers: Stephanie Bachar

You’ve probably learned about poems in school
scanning verse after verse, until you start to drool
But if you take this class
I’ll teach you some class
Unlike your school teacher I am no fool


H4119: Happiness Within: A Brief Introduction to Jainism Full!
Difficulty: Easy - This class is meant to be accessible to most students
Teachers: Finale Doshi-Velez

Jainism is a Eastern religion that talks about finding peace with oneself and the world by realizing an inner happiness that is truly one's own. Although relatively little-known, it served as inspiration for the nonviolent nature of Gandhi's protests (which later inspired Martin Luther King); elements of its philosophy have particular relevance given that America has the highest GDP of any nation--but is 26th in happiness. What exactly does Jainism say, and what do you have say in response? After a brief introduction about its history and principles, we'll focus the discussion on the implications of its philosophy in our current society.

H4222: The Tortoise and Achilles
Teachers: Farrah Yhee

If Achilles lets the Tortoise get a head start in a race, can Achilles pass the Tortoise? Can you prove it? Can you make me believe it?

That and other fun paradoxes.

H3967: The Sonnet
Teachers: Lance Ozier

The sonnet is one of the oldest and most durable forms of poetry. It’s been used by great poets from Shakespeare to ee cummings. Because it has certain rules, it poses creative challenges for any poet, but as a result can yield poems that astonish and delight. Come see how poets have met the challenges and reaped the rewards over the past 400 years.


Prerequisites
Interest in poetry

H4376: Baller People in History Full!
Difficulty: Easy - This class is meant to be accessible to most students
Teachers: Volunteer Teacher

There was a homeless man who declared himself Emperor of America, an astronaut who parachuted to Earth from space, a scientist who created mile long lightning bolts, a swordsman who carved a sword out of a boat oar on the way to his most famous duel, an explorer who traveled across an unexplored mountain range to rescue his men who were stranded in the Arctic, among other totally amazing people. We're going to talk about some of them. Well, at least, the totally baller ones.


Prerequisites
Capacity to be completely bowled over by amazing people, Ability to believe that history isn't totally boring

H4023: Free-Form Philosophy Full!

This isn't a class, really. In the tradition of philosophers since Socrates, we don't know anything: so we're not going to try to teach you anything. We will discuss questions, however. We'll talk about some classic philosophical dilemmas, but feel free to ask about your own ideas! No previous philosophy experience is required, but willingness to participate is a must.


Prerequisites
Ideas!

H4160: What in the world are we supposed to do with Art?: Intro to Philosophical Aesthetics
Teachers: Colin McSwiggen

What is art, how do we know which art is good, and why do we like it so much? What exactly do we mean when we talk about "beauty," "good taste," or "creativity"? No one really knows any of the answers, but this course will help you to think about the questions. I'll give a brief coverage of theories of art in classical, modern, and postmodern philosophy; I'll introduce concepts for analyzing the complex relationships between artists, their audiences, and the works of art that they produce; and finally I'll open the floor for discussion.

I'll try to bring some kind of pretentious cheese for us to nibble while we talk.


Prerequisites
Some kind of interest in either art or philosophy. Otherwise you'll be bored!

H4054: Conquering the Berkshires: America's First Push Westward
Teachers: Ian Martin

From the early years of the American Colonies to the mid-19th century, the Berkshire Mountains of Western Massachusetts formed a serious obstacle to transportation between Boston and Albany. We'll talk about how three major rail links helped resolve this problem and prevent Boston from losing its position as a port city. Anyone who like trains or early American history will enjoy this class, along with anyone who has wondered about the history of the MBTA's Commuter Rail Lines.

H4234: What is a "food desert"?
Teachers: Amy Woodruff

Come and learn about one of the biggest reasons for the health problems in urban areas-- food deserts. We'll talk about what these areas are, how they develop, the problems they cause, and what we can do to fix them.

H4071: Game Design 101: Part 1 (Creative Concept Development)
Teachers: Alex Chisholm

In this hands-on, activities-based workshop, the Learning Games Network, a non-profit spin-off of the MIT Education Arcade, will support students interested in competing in the National STEM Video Game Challenge (http://www.joanganzcooneycenter.org/Initiatives-31.html).

Game Design 101: Part 1 will cover the following:

-- How we think about games generally, and learning games specifically
-- Strategies for developing your concept, including analyzing games you love to play and applying what you know to new designs
-- Designing for students (and teachers)
-- Play testing your concept and incorporating feedback into your design
-- Documenting your design


Prerequisites
Students should register for at least one Part 1 and one Part 2 workshop (separate description) on both Saturday and Sunday. Prior to Splash, we encourage students to do some preparatory work, including identifying a teacher who can work with them through their design and prototype production process. And, following the MIT Splash program, webcasts will be available online and our team will hold select online “office hours” in December to support teachers and students who are interested in additional support.

H4230: Teacher! Teacher!

We all know that you know that you know what you know, but did you know that we don’t know what you know that you know? Did you know that we want to know what you know?

This class is a hands-on class about teaching--if you’ve ever wondered what it takes to be a teacher, or what it really takes to teach something--this is the class for you.

We’ll go through everything you need to teach a class: we’ll discuss basic teaching techniques and theory (pedagogy), we’ll brainstorm and plan a class--and then we’ll teach!



Prerequisites
No prerequisites, but do come prepared to talk, give your ideas, and teach! At the end of the class you will have an opportunity to teach a short lesson to the rest of the class-- so come with ideas about things you want to teach, and any materials you might need.

H4398: Poetry Infused with Neologisms
Teachers: Stephanie Bachar

Poetry Infused with Neologisms

Do you enjoy a good chortle when reading a clever poem?

Well, that’s only possible because of a poem called “The Jabberwocky” by Lewis Carroll which first coined the word “chortle.” Such words are called ‘neologisms’ – imaginary words that evoke the intended meanings. Some famous examples include:
Frugal, manxome, frumious, vorpal, galumphing, grok, quixotic, cyberspace and frindle.

Even if you find most poetry uffish and tulgey, come to this class and we’ll show you a frabjous time!


H3942: Introduction to Thai 1

There are more Asian languages that involve exotic characters and outlandish tones than Chinese, Japanese and Korean! Learn about this awesome language where tone markers don't describe the same tone on different characters. We will focus on the Thai alphabet, word formation and tone recognition. You will write your own name in Thai trying to put characters together yourself.

H3857: How Law Works Full!
Difficulty: Hard - This class may be exceptionally difficult
Teachers: Chris Peterson

An introduction to mainstream theories of legal consciousness, historical and present.

We'll broadly review how formal legal actors have conceived of the roles (order? dispute resolution? tradition?) and origins (nature? god? man?) of law throughout history, and how these different views of law have helped shape society.

We'll then do a deep dive into the issue of precedent and how it works, with a special focus on the critique of "activist judges" and whether or not it is conceptually coherent.


Prerequisites
None. However, students will get more from the class if they are specially aware of and conversant in basic concepts and issues in government structure and legal practice. For example, this course assumes a basic grasp of things like separation of powers, the idea that lawyers are advocates, and familiarity with "activist judge" as a claim that is invoked about how judges make decisions. If you are the sort of student who would take AP Gov or Poli Sci, or even if you just have the basic ideas down and want to learn some interesting stuff about how law works in practice, especially from a historiographic analysis, this is the class for you.

H3895: Introduction to Early Islamic History, the Quran and Islamic Law
Teachers: Benjamin Horowitz

Ever wonder what at Fatwa was? What guides the Sharia (Islamic) law? In this class we will quickly cover (10 minutes) the early history of Islam, the split between Sunni's and Shia (10 minutes), and then go on to discuss Islamic law for the rest. We will discuss how the Quran is arranged, what the Hadith are, the timeline of Qu'ranic interpretation, the role of the Caliphate, the Hidden Imam, and anything else people are interested in and there is time for. Questions are encouraged!

H3894: Gender: Or, what's up with all of these ties and skirts anyways? Full!

Have you ever been curious as to what exactly gender is? How does gender as a social construct form--is it a result of sexuality, or personality? Are sex and gender distinct, and is this distinction useful? How does gender interrelate with sex, class and ethnicity, and is it even separable from these ideas? How does the distinction between gender and sex factor into politics? What does it mean to be gender fluid? This class will be a discussion based, participant-focused seminar around the topic of gender. We will explain some basic topics centered around the ideas of Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Catharine MacKinnon, and some others, and then open it up for discussion centered around the key points.


Prerequisites
None, just a willingness to participate in an engaging and respectful discussion about gender.

H4380: History of the Star Wars Galaxy (Part 1) Full!
Teachers: Evan Ehrenberg

Overview of the history of the Star Wars Galaxy covering material from 30,000 BBY to 25 ABY. This is a four-part course focusing on character profiles, important events (including the Great Hyperspace War, the Sith War, the Mandelorean War, the Second Sith War, the Battle of Ruusan, the Clone Wars, the Galactic Civil War, the Birth of the New Republic, and the Yuuzhan Vong Invasion), weapons and technology (everything from blasters and lightsabers to energy shields and cloaking devices), and vehicles and vessels with a focus on the use and development of the force by the Jedi Order, the Sith, and other lesser known factions throughout. Class will consist mostly of lecture with short breaks for discussion of the material.

Part one of this course will cover history from 30,000 BBY to 1,000 BBY. This will cover events from the creation of the Star Forge to the Battle of Ruusan.
Part 2 of this course will cover material from the Clone Wars to the Galactic Civil War (22 BBY to 5 ABY).


Prerequisites
Students must have watched all of the Star Wars movies (1-6, not including the Clone Wars animated movie) and be familiar with the Star Wars galaxy and have some knowledge of expanded universe material. It is preferred that students have read some of the Star Wars novels, however it is not required of them.

H4000: Languages: Histories and Inflections
Teachers: Zachary Haney

This class will consist of two parts:
1) a historical view of languages including language families and how we talk about the development of language. (This branch of linguistics is called Historical Linguistics or Philology). We will focus in on the Romance Languages and English.
2) A discussion of what is inflection. A majority of the world's languages are so-called inflected languages. In this class, we will explore what this means and how learning the basic concept of inflection will have you on your way to learning ridiculously inflected languages such as Finnish and Latin to the standards of French and Spanish. Here I hope to bring in examples from as many different languages as possible.

I will also try to incorporate a few examples of the International Phonetic Alphabet and how it can be used to read a language that you do not know.

Certainly come to this if you are a bilingual or multilingual person. There will be lots of non-English examples, and any outside experience will be very welcome.


Prerequisites
A decent grasp of grammar will certainly help, but such a thing is not required. It would be helpful to review some grammar terms like subject, direct object, and verb if you don't recall all of them and what they mean. I will try to upload a document regarding this as time draws closer.

H3946: What does it mean to be a teen?
Teachers: Amy Estersohn

This course will cover multiple perspectives on the experience of individuals between the ages of 10 and 20, in other words, teenagers. We'll look at perspectives from pop culture, history, psychology, and biology and consider how these lenses influence teenagehood today.


Prerequisites
Your experience as a teen.

H3829: Introduction to Chinese Writing
Teachers: Stephen Hou

Chinese writing is unique among the world's major languages in that it uses thousands of characters as opposed to an alphabet with a few dozen letters. We will learn some basic characters, the organization and structure of characters, the distinction between traditional and simplified scripts, calligraphic styles and typographical fonts, how new characters are created and how Chinese characters are used in the modern Japanese and Korean languages. I will also discuss Chinese dialects and why the Chinese language did not (and will likely never) switch to an alphabetical writing system. Since the focus of this class is intended to introduce you to the concept of Chinese writing, we will not be learning Chinese conversational phrases or grammar. That's taught in another class =)


Prerequisites
This class is intended for students with very little or no previous experience with written Chinese, but previous study of any other foreign language is strongly recommended.

H3815: Build a Language Full!
Teachers: Jennifer Melot

We'll construct the phonology, syntax, and lexicon of our own language... all in 50 minutes.


Prerequisites
A willingness to learn fast (this course will involve a quick dash through basic syntax and phonology) and be creative.

H3860: Fun with English
Difficulty: Easy - This class is meant to be accessible to most students

Words that sound dirty but aren't. Sockdolagers that will add sophistication to your insults and trashtalk. Bizarre etymologies. And a couple games you can play anytime, anywhere.


Prerequisites
Discussion may include words which could be dirty or foul in meaning or etymology. Students should be mature enough to not be offended.

H3828: Paradoxes of Democracy: Fair Elections and Voting
Teachers: Stephen Hou

What if, in hypothetical two-way races during the 2008 primaries, Clinton beats Obama, Obama beats Edwards, and Edwards beats Clinton? Is this even possible? (Yes.) What would then be a fair way to decide the "best" preferences of Democrats? Whether it's a T-shirt design contest or a presidential election, voting converts preferences of individuals into a single preference for the community. We'll discuss Arrow's Impossibility Theorem, which states that there is no "perfect" way of doing so. We'll demonstrate a few of the mind-boggling flaws that every voting method must have.


Prerequisites
Comfort with arithmetic; interest in voting, political science, decision-making, and/or economics.

H3856: The Privacy Architecture of Facebook
Teachers: Chris Peterson

Everybody knows that privacy is a problem on social network sites.

But what is privacy, and what kind of problem is it? Why do these problems occur, and what can stop them?

This course will introduce students to some basic theories of privacy as a sociolegal construct. It will then discuss the environmental or architectural elements of privacy that are often invisible in our world. It will describe how these factors contribute to Facebook privacy problems, and what steps we might take to fix them.

This class is taught from an interdisciplinary humanities perspective. It will feature wide-ranging discussion about the various issues, and plenty of time for derails and interesting explorations of marginally related issues with privacy and social software.

H3953: Market Economics: Supply and Demand
Teachers: Zoe Thorkildsen

You hear about supply and demand on the news all the time, but what do they really mean? And are the newscasters even using the words correctly? (Answer: sometimes.) Learn about Adam Smith’s theory of the invisible hand, and about how markets reach equilibrium. We will also discuss elasticity of demand and supply and what implications they have for buyers and sellers in a market.

Any remaining time will be open for questions about economics in general.

H4381: History of the Star Wars Galaxy (Part 2)
Teachers: Evan Ehrenberg

Overview of the history of the Star Wars Galaxy covering material from 30,000 BBY to 25 ABY. This is a four-part course focusing on character profiles, important events (including the Great Hyperspace War, the Sith War, the Mandelorean War, the Second Sith War, the Battle of Ruusan, the Clone Wars, the Galactic Civil War, the Birth of the New Republic, and the Yuuzhan Vong Invasion), weapons and technology (everything from blasters and lightsabers to energy shields and cloaking devices), and vehicles and vessels with a focus on the use and development of the force by the Jedi Order, the Sith, and other lesser known factions throughout. Class will consist mostly of lecture with short breaks for discussion of the material.

Part 2 of this course will cover material from the Clone Wars to the Galactic Civil War (22 BBY to 5 ABY).


Prerequisites
Students must have watched all of the Star Wars movies (1-6, not including the Clone Wars animated movie) and be familiar with the Star Wars galaxy and have some knowledge of expanded universe material. It is preferred that students have read some of the Star Wars novels, however it is not required of them.

H4225: Medicine in Haiti
Teachers: Joseph Bentivegna

Dr. Bentivegna spent a volunteer year as a physician in Haiti and this course will give the student background in the diseases and problems in this country. It will also discuss international development in relationship to the recent earthquake..

H4314: Warfare in the Age of the Samurai
Teachers: Alexandre Todorov

Thanks to manga and anime, the samurai have really entered into American pop culture, yet the real things are even cooler than their fictionalized counterparts. In this class you will learn about the men who fought over Japan for 500 years, from the great leaders to the individual soldiers fighting in the battle lines.


Prerequisites
A love of action and a will to see history through the eyes of those who created it, on and off the battlefield.

H4202: LGBTQ Teen Literature

Young adult, or "teen", literature has existed for centuries, but only since the 1950s and -60s has it developed as a specific area of literature. Young adult literature containing LGTBQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, queer~questioning) characters and themes has been around for just as long, but only in the last twenty years has it really exploded as an area of young adult literature. Come and discuss books mostly new but some not so new, their importance in a social and political context, their relevance to the gay rights movement as a whole, and their relevance on an individual level.


Prerequisites
Have read some LGBTQ teen literature, interested in discussing books

H3962: Generic Awesomeness of the 19th Century, Part I Full!

NAPOLEON.

H4181: Homosexuality in Japan: Un-Repressing a Cultural Phenomenon
Teachers: Seong-Ah Cho

Japan: a repressed society, right?

Did you know that male-male sexuality was conspicuously visible in Japanese society, starting way back in the 800s all the way up till it mysteriously 'vanished' in the 1800s?

In this class, we will examine the historical phenomenon of Japanese homoeroticism through the critical evidence of a number of fascinating personal journals and historical accounts, as well as (PG-13) art and fiction from the times. This study will ultimately take us to a better understanding of the powerful and far-reaching undercurrents of Japanese society as a whole, and give us a perspective on how Japan's historical societal character affects its many social phenomena ("deviant" and not) today.

Let's take a look under the hood at what all they've been repressing for a thousand years, shall we?


Prerequisites
Some maturity is called for. This is an intellectual overview of a cultural phenomenon; I would hope modern-day social stigmas would not affect your ability to learn from our material ;)

H3949: Infant and Early Childhood Neurodevelopment Full!
Teachers: Tobie Tepfer

Learn about the milestones that developing babies and toddlers are typically expected to achieve in the realms of receptive and expressive language, fine and gross motor stages, feeding, social-emotional behavior, problem solving and sensory integration.

Why is it important that babies stick their feet in their mouths? Can you tell if newborns are going to be typically developing? Why do toddlers make up words that we can understand, anyway? Learn these answers and more. Better yet, bring your own questions!


Prerequisites
An appreciation for little things.

H3963: Generic Awesomeness of the 19th Century, Part II Full!

REVOLUTIONS OF 1848.


Prerequisites
None! (You don't have to take the first part.)

H4100: Languages: Getting by while hopping countries Full!
Teachers: Vicki Crosson

Вы хотите comprendre un peu de mehreren Sprachen para viajar y comunicar?

Have you ever wished you could speak a little bit of many languages so that you can communicate with a wide range of people?
Learn a few things about how to learn the basics and set yourself up to learn as you go through a foreign country, even if it's only for a few days.

H4178: Introductory Latin Full!
Teachers: Pamela Alvarez

A basic introduction to the Latin language


Prerequisites
Prior study of a foreign language helpful, but not required

H4219: Nationalistic Music of the Romantic Period Full!

Ever wonder where some of the greatest themes in Romantic music came from? You probably haven't. But now you are! Come find out.


Prerequisites
Interest in classical music history!

H3965: Generic Awesomeness of the 19th Century, Part III Full!

GERMAN AND ITALIAN UNIFICATION.


Prerequisites
None! (Attendance of previous Awesomenesses not required.)

H4190: Lost in Translation
Teachers: Amy Woodruff

in this class we will examine a poem from poet Pablo Neruda's book, Veinte Poemas de Amor y una Canción Desesperada", starting with the original spanish and then looking at several english translations. By comparing the translations and the original, we will attempt to answer the question, what really is lost in translation?




Prerequisites
Knowledge of Spanish will be helpful but is not required.

H4404: What We Say to People, What People Hear Full!
Teachers: Josh Shaine

“I don’t understand!” “What do you mean?” “How could you do that to me?” Have any of these been said to you? Did you know the answer? If you aren’t sure, take this course. We’ll discuss some of the reasons you are so misunderstood. The class will be lecture/discussion, with references to major theories and theorists as an inclusion, but not the major focus. The purpose of this course is to give you some tools for self-examination. It is neither for counseling nor for therapy.


Prerequisites
The major prerequisites are open-mindedness & to be non-critical of other participants.

H3722: Parliamentary Procedure and Debate
Teachers: Simone Agha

Decorum! Learn how to write your own bills and debate them using the much-loved Robert’s Rules of Order.

H4241: Introduction to Telugu
Teachers: Pranava Boyidapu

Introduce the telugu alphabet and teach some basic sentences. The course is intended to excite you to learn the language completely later in life.

H4033: Intro to the Japanese Language
Difficulty: Hard - This class may be exceptionally difficult

Have any interest in Japan? Come learn a bit about the language! We'll give you a basic introduction to both spoken and written Japanese, with an emphasis on speaking. This class is not for students who have taken Japanese before or for students who have taught themselves Japanese though anime. Expect to learn a lot in this class but still feel absolutely clueless by the end of it; Japanese is an incredibly complex language and we'll barely be able to scratch the surface in three hours.

H3731: Japanese Folklore: Kitsune, Oni and Yuurei, Oh My!

Ever wondered what a "tanuki" really is, or what the difference is between a youkai and a yuurei? Find out the answers here! Join us as we explore Japanese folklore and superstitions.


Prerequisites
Just come interested in learning about the supernatural side of Japan!

H4407: Introduction to Positive Disintegration - Part 1 Full!
Difficulty: Hard - This class may be exceptionally difficult
Teachers: Josh Shaine

Dr. Kazimierz Dabrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration (TPD) provides a lot of explanations for why some of us feel as if we fit into this world so poorly.

In this session, we will explore the basics of TPD, including OverExcitabilities, Dynamisms, and Levels of Development of personality.

So, if you are looking for alternate explanations for why some things bother you far more than they bother most folks, join us!

H4321: Copyright: Laws and Implications

We often hear scare stories about kids who download songs from the Internet and then gets sued for millions. Downloading music and other media is considered by many to be equivalent to stealing.

But what is it that the kid steals when he downloads a song, and from whom does he steal it? We would like to think that it is the music itself, but the downloaded file just contains a bunch of numbers that the computer uses to make sound. And why is the fine so high? Surely, the song doesn’t cost thousands of dollars, especially when a CD with a dozen of them costs just a few bucks.

In this class, we will discuss the theory behind copyright laws, and what the court cases and battles that go into them are. We will also discuss some of the interesting implications of these laws (such as the fact that 80-year-old Mickey Mouse cartoons are still under copyright).

H4026: Chinese Internet Slang
Difficulty: Easy - This class is meant to be accessible to most students
Teachers: Huilian Qiu

You don't need to know any Chinese. You can come to this class without knowing how to say "HELLO" in Chinese. I'll translate every slang into English and make sure you guys can understand what it means. Just come to learn something really fun and get to know about current China. I'll write down the Chinese but you can choose not to remember it if you don't want to.


Prerequisites
No Chinese knowledge required. If you know some Chinese, that would be better. But not REQUIRED! The only thing required is the interest in China.

H4244: Myanmar : Home of Burmese Pythons
Difficulty: Easy - This class is meant to be accessible to most students
Teachers: Suan Tuang

Want to learn about the country that has one of the biggest pythons on the planet and yet is a country with GDP capita of just $462? When was the last time a Nobel Peace Prize winner wasn't allowed to receive his/her Nobel Prize due to government intervention?

Learn about the Noble Laureate who spent 14 of the past 20 year in house arrest. Expand your cultural horizons and learn about the country of Myanmar (formerly known as Burma).

We will discuss current state of Myanmar while covering various topics such as the military government, ongoing elections, living conditions, etc.


Prerequisites
Ready to explore!

H3879: I Know It When I See It Full!
Teachers: Paul Kominers

How the US deals with obscenity is, by definition, incredibly poorly defined, most famously codified when Justice Stewart declared that "I know it when I see it". In this class, we'll discuss why obscenity is so hard to pin down in law and both how and why we deal with it as we do right now.


Prerequisites
The understanding that I am not a lawyer.

H4424: The History of Middle-Earth: the First Age
Teachers: Raisa Lardie

JRR Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings takes place fairly late in the overall timeline of Middle-Earth; what happened before that? Come learn about the rich history of Arda as we follow the events that ultimately led to Biblo Baggin's discovery of the One Ring.

Part two in a three-class series, the First Age marks the Awakening of the Elves and their the Great Journey westward, the forging of the Silmarils (and what on Arda is a Silmaril anyways?), and the Awakening of Men, among other things, notably battles... We will also learn who Fëanor is and why his sons helped ruin everything.


Prerequisites
Students should have taken part one of this series, The History of Middle-Earth: the Valian Years Familiarity with the Silmarillion is helpful but not required, as we will be covering this material in class. An extensive knowledge of the history of Middle-Earth only means that you will be terribly bored

H4086: College Essay Funtime Full!

Is your Common App too common? Is your personal essay too essay and not enough person? Do you want your essay to be as awesome as you are?!

Bring your essay(s) and come workshop with us! We'll work together to make sure your writing is so awesome that admissions officers around the world will go blind from overexposure to pure awesomeness!


Prerequisites
A college essay, a pony and a plate of cookies.

H4382: History of the Star Wars Galaxy (Part 3)
Teachers: Evan Ehrenberg

Overview of the history of the Star Wars Galaxy covering material from 30,000 BBY to 25 ABY. This is a four-part course focusing on character profiles, important events (including the Great Hyperspace War, the Sith War, the Mandelorean War, the Second Sith War, the Battle of Ruusan, the Clone Wars, the Galactic Civil War, the Birth of the New Republic, and the Yuuzhan Vong Invasion), weapons and technology (everything from blasters and lightsabers to energy shields and cloaking devices), and vehicles and vessels with a focus on the use and development of the force by the Jedi Order, the Sith, and other lesser known factions throughout. Class will consist mostly of lecture with short breaks for discussion of the material.

Part three of this course will cover history from 5 ABY to aprox. 25 ABY. This will cover events from the creation of the New Republic to the beginning of the Yuuzhan Vong invasion.


Prerequisites
Students must have watched all of the Star Wars movies (1-6, not including the Clone Wars animated movie) and be familiar with the Star Wars galaxy and have some knowledge of expanded universe material. It is preferred that students have read some of the Star Wars novels, however it is not required of them.

H4240: Incredible India
Teachers: Pranava Boyidapu

A brief overview of the variety and diversity of Indian culture.

H4413: Introduction to Positive Disintegration - Part 2
Difficulty: Hard - This class may be exceptionally difficult
Teachers: Josh Shaine

In Part 2, we'll look more deeply into Dabrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration and how the different levels of development are reflected in behaviors and emotions.

Among the ideas we will explore are positive maladjustment, auto-psychotherapy, and syntony vs. empathy.


Prerequisites
EIther Part 1 or a previous exposure to Dabrowski's work.

H3970: How to Read a Poem
Teachers: Lance Ozier

Have you ever read a poem and wondered what is going on? Or, as the poet T. S. Eliot once wrote, have you “had the experience but missed the meaning”? In this class you will learn eight simple techniques to help you make more sense of the poems you read.


Prerequisites
Interest in poetry and language.

H4295: I'm Not a Prescriptivist, But...
Teachers: Diyang Tang

Everyone has a word-related pet peeve. Is there a word other people misuse that makes you a bit sad, since you like the word so much? Come exalt over words, but also come prepared to celebrate the fluidity of the English language and how word meanings change.


Prerequisites
Have in interest in the nuances of word meanings!

H3997: What is art?
Teachers: Nora Räsänen

What is art to you? See the ways in which professionals in various fields have addressed this question, and whether or not you agree with them. As students, we will discuss art from cultures around the world and try to come up our own answer to this age-old question.


Prerequisites
Some knowledge in art history/anthropology/studio art helpful but not necessary.

H3998: Español: Spanish from the Basics
Teachers: Zachary Haney

¡Hola! Would you like to read Don Quixote de la Manca in the original? How about Borges? Garcia Marquez?

We will begin with the first words you might want to know and move on to be able to read actual Spanish. The goal I have is that you will see that it is unnecessary to always employ English to learn Spanish. If done well, very little translation will be used to elucidate this concept. By the end of course, we will have you set on the right path to learning a language spoken by over 300 million people (the third most spoken language in the world).

¡Nos vemos pronto!


Prerequisites
Maybe some basic grammar knowledge would make it easier to have some questions answered (e.g. what is a verb), but beyond that it will start from the very beginnings. It would be very helpful to learn some of the basic pronunciation and alphabet, so we will be able to move through that quickly. I will try to attach a document regarding this.