Splash! 2007
Course Catalog


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Programming Video Games in C/C++

Interested in video games? Want to make your own? Then join us in our two hour journey into recreating the 1970's classic, Pong. We will make the entire game, complete with artificial intelligence and special effects. In this class we will be using C++ and the game library Allegro. The library and the language are both cross platform, so your game will work on almost any system you can imagine. Familiarity with a programming language is STRONGLY encouraged -- take a class at Splash on C/C++!

MATERIALS: You may wish to bring a laptop to follow along in class. Software and course files will be provided on CDs. If you use Linux/Mac/Vista, you may encounter problems installing the software in class -- try to install the software beforehand. Instructions are available on the class website.


Prerequisites
Exposure to C/C++ encouraged

Introduction to Programming
Teachers: Stephen Oney

This course will provide a brief introduction to programming using the Java language. Topics covered will be classes, methods, inheritance, syntax, and more!

Reading and Writing in Binary
Teachers: Shawn Westerdale

Learn the alphabet and how to read and write in binary code

01000010 01101001 01101110 01100001 01110010 01111001 00000000 01101001 01110011 00000000 01100110 01110101 01101110

How Computers Work: Software
Teachers: Nelson Elhage

You probably know how to use a computer, and maybe even how to program
one in C, BASIC, Java, or python. But do you really understand how one
works? Do you know what happens in the hardware when a computer first
turns on? Exactly what role does the operating system serve, and how
does it interact with your applications? We'll take a whirlwind tour
through computing, learning about the layers of abstraction and
complexity that build up to the software most of us use every day.

A rapid introduction to the Lambda Calculus
Teachers: Nelson Elhage

This will be a rapid introduction to the Lambda Calculus, a
theoretical model of computing originally proposed by Alonzo Church in
the 1930s. We will explore how, starting from the barest primitive
ideas, you can derive all the comutational power of a modern desktop
computer!

NOTE: This is not the calculus you've heard about in school!
In fact, there are almost no numbers involved, and you don't need to
know any math -- just have a curiosity for some slightly abstract
reasoning.

Goal Oriented Machine Learning
Teachers: Bo Morgan

Machine learning is a field of artificial intelligence that focuses on how computers can adapt or change as they are trying to accomplish goals. What are goals? What are methods for computers to learn to accomplish goals? Computers aren't very good at learning to accomplishing human goals yet: I'll discuss why and what you can do help program computers to learn to accomplish goals as complex as human goals!


Introduction to Creative Synthesis

The ideal of creative synthesis is that the process of creation is intellectually, mechanically, and socially a synthetic collaboration, frames our work. Humans are users of tools and, philosophically, the perceived uniqueness of this trait has defined our understanding of ourselves since the beginning of time. Tools have become increasingly complex, from a chipped stone ax to a web programming interface shared across millions. With rare exceptions everything we do, and everything we do it with, has been constructed by the collaboration and synthesis of thousands of others working before us. This class will attempt to understanding the social, technological, and philosophical implications of creative synthesis and the current trends of synthetic collaboration on the web. We will survey technology (and seeming untechnology) as examples of the acts and artifacts of creative synthesis. Coupled with this we will focus on understanding web programming as a medium for creative synthesis, and collaboratively construct a web application by focusing on what and why, with a little bit of how.


Prerequisites
Web familiarity.

Computational Reflective Thinking
Teachers: Bo Morgan

Some people say, "computers are not Conscious". They are right, but why? We will unpack a few of the many meanings of this suitcase word, Conscious, and talk about the degree to which computer designs exhibit each of these simpler meanings. We will discuss how to begin to program a few of these different meanings. A novel field of computer science, called "Causal Reflective Programming," will be briefly introduced in the context of modern artificial intelligence, neuroscience, and psychology.

Computer Game Hacking: An Overview
Teachers: Kenneth Schumacher

Interested in taking apart computer games and applications and bending them to your will? If so, this is the class for you. We will be briefly touching on many methods and tools used when “hacking” computer games. (Memory searching, hex editing, code injection, packet editing, patching, etc.) I will be available via email after the class for questions regarding any projects you decide to take on.


Prerequisites
Decent knowledge of Windows OS

Misc. Computer Science Q and A
Teachers: Kenneth Schumacher

Come to this class with any computer questions you could possibly have. (Please try to keep them fairly interesting, haha.) I am a life-long computer nerd and should be able to answer the majority of them; from types of RAID harddrive arrays to the Bittorrent and HTTP communication protocols to how DDoS attacks work. This class WILL end up going off on many tangents and will be a lot of fun.


Prerequisites
At least a basic understanding of computers

How the Internet and Networks Work
Teachers: Kenneth Schumacher

Ever wonder how a message you send from your computer is split up and makes it all the way to China in under quarter a second? We will be examining in detail how the internet and networks function. We will take a look at DNS servers, network setups, packet routing, switches, communication protocols, IP address allocation, preforming trace-routes, proxys, how schools filter web traffic, etc. It will be a lot of fun—sign up now!


Prerequisites
Basic understanding of computers.

Document Similarity Measurement and Clustering
Teachers: Stanislav Nikolov

Ever Google something and get dozens of annoying irrelevant topics that somehow relate to your query? How do you sort through the mess?

If you have an assorted group of articles, on various topics, how do you separate them into categories? More importantly, how would a computer do it? How does one measure how related two articles (or any textual document) are?

With these tools among others, you can go forth and tackle the problem of making sense of the information overload that permeates everyday life. Are you up to the challenge?


Prerequisites
knowledge of vectors; some linear algebra for the more advanced topics would be helpful

Advanced Java: Identity, Equality, and Reflection
Teachers: Derek Rayside

Many data structures, such as hash tables, depend on you to implement the equals() and hashCode() methods correctly for your objects. Getting these right is tricky, especially when your code uses inheritance. This lecture will introduce you to an easy to use Java library that implements these for you, using reflection.




Prerequisites
working knowledge of Java, including inheritance

Doing stuff with data
Teachers: Derek Rayside

Almost all of the data you interact with is in one of four structures, and what you're doing with it is probably one of three different functions. Learn what these structures and functions are, and thereby have bigger and better thoughts about the data in your life.

The ideas in this lecture will explain and relate MP3 files, spreadsheets, databases, HTML, XML, social networks, etc. We'll use some spiffy websites like RememberTheMilk.com and DabbleDB.com.

This lecture is intended for both programmers and non-programmers. No programming knowledge is necessary, and we will not be learning how to program. We're going to think big thoughts about data.

PS: The structures are stream, table, tree, and graph. The functions are map, filter, and reduce.


Prerequisites
Familiarity with computers, the web, etc. Some capacity for abstract/geometrical thinking.

Promiscuous Mode: Network Protocol Analysis
Teachers: Harvey Yee

Do you want to be in Promiscuous mode? You may if you are a hacker or a network engineer. Join us in learning what is involved in Network Protocol analysis, and along the way learn about network architecture and protocols. Depending on what is available in the class room, a demonstration of a wired or wireless network session will be provided. A free copy of Linux LiveCD will be provided so that you can continue your learning of network protocol analysis after this class.



Prerequisites
a sense of curiosity

Linux and You
Teachers: Adam Seering

So, you've heard of this whole Linux thing. Maybe you're just a bit frustrated with Windows; maybe you've been scared off by Linux in the past. In this class I'll show you how to install Linux on your own computer and how to use it for basic stuff like word processing and games, and I'll also glance briefly at the Linux command line and some of the amazingly powerful things you can do with this operating system.

I'll be answering questions throughout the class and at the end I'll open it to general questions and discussion, so bring something to say!

Each student will take home an Ubuntu Linux Live/Install CD.

Concurrency and Parallel Programming
Teachers: Dan Noe

While computers have grown faster for some time, current hardware developments are in the area of simultaneous processing, not single task execution. Additionally, high tech companies such as Google have scaled their technology through the use of massively parallel processing. This class will explore the advantages and pitfalls of parallel programming and concurrent execution, including a discussion of theory and techniques for synchronizing multiple tasks. No knowledge of specific computer languages is necessary, but the class will assume a basic familiarity with the workings of a computer.


Prerequisites
Basic knowledge of a computer

Common Sense Reasoning for Artificial Intelligence
Teachers: Catherine Havasi

When people communicate with each other, their conversation relies on many basic, unspoken assumptions. We often learn the basis behind these assumptions long before they can write at all, making the difficult for computers to learn. These assumptions underlie all forms of human communication from teaching, to giving directions, to ordering dinner at a restaurant.

A user who interacts with a computer interface, however, can become frustrated because the computer does not understand their goals and motivations. For human-computer interaction to become as fluent as communication between humans, computers need to be able to understand the user's basic, unspoken assumptions. These assumptions form the body of knowledge known as ``common sense'' and we'll be discussing how it is collected and used by the AI research community.

Linear algebra experience will helpful to demystify some of the algorithms discussed at the end of the class but is by no means required.

Database-Backed Web Design

So you've written an awesome webpage for the whole world to see! But you want something more than that: You want your friends to be able to post comments on your pages. You want people to be able to upload pictures, change content, even add their own pages to your site. In short: You want to know how to make a dynamic, database-backed website! In this class, we'll be looking at the Django web framework, using the Python programming language.


Prerequisites
Experience with HTML; programming Java, Python, or related

Natural Language Processing

It's well past 2001, and we still can't talk with our computers. Well, okay, we can tell our cell phones whom to call, dictate our papers to speech recognizers, and hear driving directions from the car GPS. Google can try to translate web pages. And cell phones predict what you wanted to type. How does this stuff work? We'll try to figure out how to make computers understand English.


Prerequisites
intermediate programming knowledge (read/write Python or similar languages)

Photoshopping for Beginners

Want to create cool illusions with Adobe Photoshop? In this exciting class we will cover the basics of image manipulation in Photoshop. We'll do a series of small projects to familiarize yourself with some of the tools and functions of Photoshop. Some of the activities include erasing people, creating amusing road signs, and morphing imaginary animals.

IMPORTANT: Students will need to bring a LAPTOP capable of running Adobe Photoshop and a MOUSE. A 30 day trial of the software will be available at the beginning of class.

Scratch - An Introduction

Make stories, games, and animations with Scratch, an easy to learn programming environment from the MIT Media Lab.

Web App Programming with AppJet

We will teach you how to build interactive web applications and give you a place to host them for free.

This class is a prerequisite for our other class, "Facebook App Programming with AppJet".

Some experience with programming and HTML is recommended.

We will be using a new online programming tool called AppJet. AppJet is designed to make it really easy to write a hosted web application. With AppJet, you write your entire program using JavaScript. (For those in the know: AppJet runs your JavaScript on its servers and has a JavaScript object database).

We will also provide free hosting at .appjet.com.

After taking this class, you might also want to participate in one of our "Laboratory in Web App Programming" sessions, where you can get more hands-on experience building web apps or facebook apps.

See http://splash-info.appjet.com/ for the latest course updates and schedule.



Prerequisites
basic programming and HTML

Introduction to Python
Teachers: Eric Price

Ever wanted to learn how to program? I'll teach you [Python](http://python.org/), a clean and easy-to-learn language with all the power you need.

Laboratory in Web App Programming

These lab sessions complement the "Web App Programming with AppJet" and "Facebook App Programming with AppJet" classes.

In this lab, you can work in a group building web apps or facebook apps with AppJet. The three of us will be there to answer your questions.

We will also provide a series of web programming challenge problems, and be available to give you hints and ideas along the way. During the last 10 minutes of each session, we will present and discuss successful solutions by students.

If you have a laptop, please bring it. (We will try to provide some computers if we can.)

IMPORTANT NOTE: Although the Splash catalog lists this class at one time frame, we will have the lab open most of the weekend! To see the schedule of lab hours, check http://splash-info.appjet.com/ . We will also be posting announcements there.

Come hang out in the lab as much as you'd like, and we will help you get your web apps and facebook apps online!



Prerequisites
Web App Programming with AppJet (C911)

Scratch Board -Scratch to the next level

Make your Scratch projects interactive using the Scratch Board, a circuit board with light, sound, and resistance sensors.


Prerequisites
Scratch - An Introduction or HSSP course "Creating Projects in Scratch"

Facebook App Programming with AppJet

We will teach you how to build Facebook Apps! We will also give you a free place to host them, using AppJet.

A Facebook account and some basic knowledge of programming and HTML are required, as well as attending the "Web Programming with AppJet" class (C911). (If you are an advanced programmer, you may be able to take this class without "Web Programming with AppJet".)

After taking this class, you might also want to participate in one of our "Laboratory in Web Programming" sessions, for additional help getting your Facebook app online.

See http://splash-info.appjet.com/ for the latest course updates and schedule.



Prerequisites
Web App Programming with AppJet (C911)

Learn Programming with Processing

This class is all about teaching people who haven't programmed before how to use a cool graphical programming language called Processing.

We'll talk about what computers do, how they do it, and how *you* can make computers do what you want. Well, as much as we can get to in two hours. :)

Bring a laptop if you've got one, but no worries if you don't! (And if you do bring a laptop -- please install the latest version of Processing from http://www.processing.org/ )

What's the Internet all about anyway?
Teachers: J.D. Zamfirescu

Have some programming skills but at a loss when it comes to TCP/IP? Come learn about how the nuts and bolts of the Internet work.

How does data get from one place to another? Who keeps track of it? How do webservers work? How does AIM work? E-mail? How does the Internet know who I'm sending an IM to?

Answers to all these questions and more!! (And of course, bring your own questions too!!)


Prerequisites
Some programming experience helpful.

Introduction to Programming with Haskell
Teachers: Nelson Elhage

This is a class for students who are interested in computers, but who may have never programmed before. Using the functional language Haskell, we'll learn how to express computation, and write computer programs to do interesting things.

Haskell is one of the most advanced and powerful languages out there, but this class will aim to make it easy and approachable for you! No programming experience is required, but some background in math of at least algebra is useful.

Purely Functional Programming in Haskell
Teachers: Alex Schwendner

Are you familiar with programming in imperative languages such as C, Java, Perl, etc? This class is an introduction to programming with an entirely different way of thinking, using functional programming in Haskell. Features like lazy evaluation, algebraic data types, and type inference make writing code in Haskell more like writing math. We'll talk about paradigms to write general, powerful code quickly and elegantly using functional programming, and I'll try to convince you why Haskell is the most elegant and awesome programming language.

The main difference between this class and the one by Nelson Elhage is that this one is intended for students who are used to programming in imperative programming languages.


Prerequisites
computer programming experience

Web App Programming with AppJet

We will teach you how to build interactive web applications and give you a place to host them for free.

This class is a prerequisite for our other class, "Facebook App Programming with AppJet".

Some experience with programming and HTML is recommended.

We will be using a new online programming tool called AppJet. AppJet is designed to make it really easy to write a hosted web application. With AppJet, you write your entire program using JavaScript. (For those in the know: AppJet runs your JavaScript on its servers and has a JavaScript object database).

We will also provide free hosting at .appjet.com.

After taking this class, you might also want to participate in one of our "Laboratory in Web App Programming" sessions, where you can get more hands-on experience building web apps or facebook apps.

See http://splash-info.appjet.com/ for the latest course updates and schedule.


Prerequisites
basic programming and HTML

Web App Programming with AppJet

We will teach you how to build interactive web applications and give you a place to host them for free.

This class is a prerequisite for our other class, "Facebook App Programming with AppJet".

Some experience with programming and HTML is recommended.

We will be using a new online programming tool called AppJet. AppJet is designed to make it really easy to write a hosted web application. With AppJet, you write your entire program using JavaScript. (For those in the know: AppJet runs your JavaScript on its servers and has a JavaScript object database).

We will also provide free hosting at .appjet.com.

After taking this class, you might also want to participate in one of our "Laboratory in Web App Programming" sessions, where you can get more hands-on experience building web apps or facebook apps.

See http://splash-info.appjet.com/ for the latest course updates and schedule.


Prerequisites
basic programming and HTML

Visualizing Our World: Ray Tracing and Computer Graphics
Teachers: Daniel Zaharopol

The best computer images---those used in movies and high-quality renderings---come from a process known as "ray tracing," literally the notion of following rays of light to see what colors your eye sees. We'll talk about the ideas and mathematics behind these pictures. If you know how to program, this class will prepare you to write your own raytracer to render 3-D images, but programming is not at all required.


Prerequisites
Algebra and geometry are highly recommended. Familiarity with 3-D geometry (like dot product and cross product) will be useful, but not required.

Software Engineering
Teachers: Jeremy Smith

This class is for people who know how to code but want to learn the practices and standards for software engineers. Topics covered will be abstraction, representation, modularity, specifications, testing, style, and more.


Prerequisites
Familiarity with Object Oriented Programming

Introducing Artificial Intelligence as Problems of Knowledge
Teachers: Dustin Smith

This is an introduction to the field of Artificial Intelligence. I will introduce the problem landscape using Knowledge as the backbone for asking and answering these questions:

- what is knowledge?
- how do we evaluate knowledge?
- how is it acquired (e.g., learning, inference)?
- how is it represented (e.g., language)?
- how is it used to solve problems?

Students should have a strong interest in building intelligent machines.

The Wonders of Pi
Teachers: Rufus Roo Roo

The class is all about the greatest number ever "invented" - pi!! We will start with discussing exactly what pi is and a brief history of pi. Then we will discuss different ways to compute pi, and how pi shows up in your life every single day!


Prerequisites
Algebra, geometry, and trigonometry helpful, but anyone is welcome

Introducing Artificial Intelligence as Problems of Knowledge
Teachers: Dustin Smith

This is an introduction to the field of Artificial Intelligence. I will introduce the problem landscape using Knowledge as the backbone for asking and answering these questions:

- what is knowledge?
- how do we evaluate knowledge?
- how is it acquired (e.g., learning, inference)?
- how is it represented (e.g., language)?
- how is it used to solve problems?

Students should have a strong interest in building intelligent machines.

Scheming
Teachers: Aviv Ovadya

An introduction to Scheme, a ridiculously flexible and powerful programming language.

This class is meant for people who don't know scheme (or other lisp variants). However, you should have some minimum programming experience - you should know what if statements and functions are.


Prerequisites
Basic programming experience


Hobbies

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The Crash Course Course... To Go
Teachers: Jordan Persson

The Crash Course Course makes a brief comeback for Splash. Since we only have a weekend, the tricks taught will be quick and easy... but still cool as hell. You'll learn to psych out your friends and foes and how to make some neat gadgets with things found around the house.

Be sure not to miss the class loved by students and feared by law enforcement!

Build Your Own Headphone Amplifier
Teachers: Michael Price

I enjoy do-it-yourself (DIY) audio because you can build loudspeakers and electronics with immediate, enjoyable results. We can't build a pair of speakers in a short Splash class (wait until Spring HSSP for that); but we can start small. A headphone amplifier uses the same type of circuit building blocks as almost everything else, and it might noticeably improve the sound quality of your headphones.

I'll teach you some basic ideas about how circuits work, and how to build and test them using lab equipment at the MIT Edgerton Center. I'll demonstrate the role of filters in changing the tone of sounds, and how they're used to create accurate (or at least good sounding) speakers.

Each of my brave students will receive a kit of electronic parts and documentation explaining the operation of the circuit, step by step. Then you'll build and keep a battery powered headphone amp.

Imagine, Invent, Inhabit!

Students will learn about architecture and the environment in a hands-on way. We will investigate issues of sustainability, structure and creative problem-solving. Students will get the opportunity to design and build their own shelters out of completely recycled materials at full scale.


Prerequisites
enthusiasm!

Rubiks Cube in 5 Easy steps! Class I

Learn to solve a Rubiks Cube! This will be exciting - you never know you can solve one under 3 minutes unless you try! A two-hour workshop for a lifetime skill. Come learn and stun your friends! (We have Class I and Class II - choose the one that best fits your time. Please bring your cube if you have one)

Baseball Statistics
Teachers: Anthony Rindone

Baseball enthusiasts or newbies who want to understand the game better, this is for you. Previous statistics knowledge is not required.


Understand some of the simplest and oldest statistical measures (AVG, OBP, OPS, SLG %, etc.) to the more present and incredibly accurate measures (VORP, PE, Pythagorean Records, etc.)

Some time will be spent on deriving a few of these, but most time will be spent on understanding why these are important, as well as identifying the "best" players, under rated/over rated players, and a few surprises. We will also do a managing simulation/competitions on a computer program near the end of the class.

Students are encouraged to bring their own statistical inquiries (anything from "what does this mean on the back of my baseball card?" to "why do people care about Barry Bonds and the home-run record?" can be discussed in class.)

Card Throwing
Teachers: Kevin Hwang

Learn how to throw ordinary playing cards!


Prerequisites
wrists

Card Throwing
Teachers: Kevin Hwang

Learn how to throw ordinary playing cards!


Prerequisites
wrists

The Delivery and Use of Pick-up Lines
Teachers: Kevin Hwang

$$ \emph{Do you believe in love at first sight, or should I walk by again?} $$
In this class, we'll take a look at a number of pickup lines, from the great to the very very lame, and figure out a couple of our favorites. We'll also talk about delivery, because not even the best pickup line in the world can cover poor delivery. No prior experience necessary.

Homebuilt Hi-fi and Music Lounge

I'm an audio hobbyist - I like to build my own stereo systems from the ground up. In this short and informal "class" I'll present some of the equipment that I designed and built, in a guided show-and-tell. We will scratch the surface of some of the electrical and mechanical engineering concepts that go into these projects. You'll see what is involved in building gizmos like amplifiers and speakers yourself.

Then we'll sit back and enjoy some of your favorite music. Please bring CDs that you'd like to try, or a portable music player!

Balloon Animal Workshop

Do you feel your life wasting away before your eyes due to your lack of balloon animal-making skills? I felt that way once. Then I learned to make balloon animals. Latex balloons are very easy to shape into all kinds of fun animals and various other crazy contraptions. The first half of the class will be spent learning to make some basic animals, while the second half will be devoted to creating anything you can imagine out of as many balloons as we can blow up. Come have fun making balloon animals with us and learn a little about why balloons behave the way they do.

Note: As mentioned above, the balloons we will be using are made of latex. If you are allergic to latex, please do not sign up for the class.

Balloon Animal Workshop

Do you feel your life wasting away before your eyes due to your lack of balloon animal-making skills? I felt that way once. Then I learned to make balloon animals. Latex balloons are very easy to shape into all kinds of fun animals and various other crazy contraptions. The first half of the class will be spent learning to make some basic animals, while the second half will be devoted to creating anything you can imagine out of as many balloons as we can blow up. Come have fun making balloon animals with us and learn a little about why balloons behave the way they do.

Note: As mentioned above, the balloons we will be using are made of latex. If you are allergic to latex, please do not sign up for the class.

Homebuilt Hi-fi and Music Lounge

I'm an audio hobbyist - I like to build my own stereo systems from the ground up. In this short and informal "class" I'll present some of the equipment that I designed and built, in a guided show-and-tell. We will scratch the surface of some of the electrical and mechanical engineering concepts that go into these projects. You'll see what is involved in building gizmos like amplifiers and speakers yourself.

Then we'll sit back and enjoy some of your favorite music. Please bring CDs that you'd like to try, or a portable music player!

Homebuilt Hi-fi and Music Lounge

I'm an audio hobbyist - I like to build my own stereo systems from the ground up. In this short and informal "class" I'll present some of the equipment that I designed and built, in a guided show-and-tell. We will scratch the surface of some of the electrical and mechanical engineering concepts that go into these projects. You'll see what is involved in building gizmos like amplifiers and speakers yourself.

Then we'll sit back and enjoy some of your favorite music. Please bring CDs that you'd like to try, or a portable music player!

Boffer Weapon Construction

Tired of using a videogame controller to fight your battles? Come build a boffer weapon and be your own avatar! A boffer is a padded foam weapon constructed to strict safety standards used for fights in Live Action Role-Playing (LARPing) or just plain fun. In this class we will learn to build basic mid-length swords. If time permits, we may find a place to try out your creations.

Teacher's note: If you have attended this class before, please refrain from signing up so that others may try something new. Thanks!

Star Trek: Irritation

Why do they still use the Holodeck after so many malfunctions? Why are ensigns the only ones to be vaporized on away missions? And who ever thought Deep Space Nine was a good idea?

Star Trek: Irritation will give Trekkies a chance to spout off about what in the Trek universe gets their Heisenberg compensators out of whack. Come and talk in a supportive, therapeutic enviroment about everything that annoys you, from Starfleet's curious lack of spacesuits, to time travel, and Wesley Crusher. We will also be discussing Denebian slime devils, Kirk vs. Picard, and Chakotay...while exploring important topics like theology, the destiny of mankind, and Riker's beard.

A firm grasp of the Star Trek universe is highly recommended. This class is for geeks and geeks at heart.





Boffer Weapon Construction

Tired of using a videogame controller to fight your battles? Come build a boffer weapon and be your own avatar! A boffer is a padded foam weapon constructed to strict safety standards used for fights in Live Action Role-Playing (LARPing) or just plain fun. In this class we will learn to build basic mid-length swords. If time permits, we may find a place to try out your creations.

Teacher's note: If you have attended this class before, please refrain from signing up so that others may try something new. Thanks!

Beyond Paper Cranes
Teachers: Ada Ren

Paper cranes get boring after a while but there's more to this old origami model than you can imagine. Look at some of Sebanzaru Orikata's layouts for connected cranes and start on designing your own connected cranes. (BRING A PAIR OF SCISSORS-- we will be violating some rules of origami)


Prerequisites
be able to fold a paper crane

Make a Jayne Hat! (Firefly)
Teachers: Jasmine Florentine

"A man walks down the street in that hat, people know he's not afraid of anything."
If you're a fan of Firefly, then you probably want a shiny hat like Jayne Cobb's (and if you don't know what that is, google it or go re-watch episode 12.)

Learn the basics for making a hat - knitting, reading patterns, making pom-poms, killing Reavers. No experience required.

This class is listed as a one hour class, but it will continue past the end time for as long as you would like to stay around finishing your hat (no later than 11pm, though).

For a fun supplement, also check out "Being a Browncoat 101 - An Intro to the Firefly 'Verse"

Spraypaint Mural Workshop
Teachers: Gabriel Cira

Learn to tag! This class will teach basic techniques and principles of spraypaint art. We'll provide Big paper and lots of Montana cans. Bring your creativity and wear clothes that you are not afraid to get a little dirty.

Duct Tape Design

Come learn how to make things out of duct tape! We will discuss techniques to construct just about anything out of that most wonderful and versatile of building materials -- duct tape! And not just the standard fare -- we'll also look at smaller, trickier things, that need more cleverness and finesse, like gloves. Bring your own tape if you've got it!

The Art of Chain Mail

A long time ago, when things were more hardcore, people actually tried to kill each other with swords. Those who didn't want to be killed defended themselves with things like armor and chain mail. Come learn a few of the weaves they used for this, and a few that they didn't. You might even get to try out a few cooler things.

Patrol
Teachers: Liza Plotnikov

Travel to strange new classrooms. Meet interesting, unusual people, and kill them! Patrol is a high-action game of live combat with rubber-dart guns. Shoot your friends, then watch out as they try to take their revenge. Sponsored by the MIT Assassins' Guild

NOTE: Since this event is run by a separate student group at MIT, you will need a separate permission slip for it. Please print out the form found on the class website, have your parent/guardian sign it and bring it with you. You will not be allowed into the class otherwise.

Poi Workshop (Beginner)

Top 10 Reasons to Spin Poi:
10. It's good exercise!
9. It makes people try really hard not to stare at you.
8. It lets you create complicated, technical patterns and fool people into thinking you can dance.
7. It lets you play with toys and fool people into thinking you can dance.
6. Why not?
5. It's the most fun you will ever have with a pair of socks.
4. It's an excuse to think about physics!
3. It's actually a great way to dance to music.
2. Procrastination.
1. It's an excuse to play with fire!

For those of you that wanted a real explanation, go here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poi_%28juggling%29

For those of you who think a YouTube video is worth 1000 Wikis, go here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VCcLZUT81Lw


Prerequisites
At least one hand

Automotive Engine Basics
Teachers: Craig Wildman

This course will cover the basics of how an internal combustion engine works. We will disassemble a car engine and pass around parts to understand what they do and why they were made the way they were. Also, we will discuss relevant issues such as power, efficiency, and emissions. Some background on energy use and pollution will be mentioned as well.

How to Draw Shiny Things
Teachers: Andrew Geng

Come learn some basics of drawing shiny things! After we talk about some ways to make things look shiny, you'll have a chance to apply what you've learned. If you've always wanted to know how to draw water, glass, metal, or even the shiny buttons in Mac OS X, this class is for you!

I'll provide white paper and a few colored pencils, but feel free to bring your own art materials.

How to Draw Shiny Things
Teachers: Andrew Geng

Come learn some basics of drawing shiny things! After we talk about some ways to make things look shiny, you'll have a chance to apply what you've learned. If you've always wanted to know how to draw water, glass, metal, or even the shiny buttons in Mac OS X, this class is for you!

I'll provide white paper and a few colored pencils, but feel free to bring your own art materials.

Magic 101 - Card Tricks
Teachers: Kevin Brokish

Learn to perform mind-blowing card tricks! No experience necessary: we'll start with the basic, essential moves that are common to many tricks. Then we'll use those moves to perform some of the astonishing card tricks that professional street magicians do.

Comics and Manga I: Design and Illustration
Teachers: Jennifer Fu

Has your love for comics or manga inspired you to create comic-related art? Drawing for comics and manga often involves techniques and processes that are not immediately relevant to general drawing. Learn what it takes, whether you're drawing comic art for the first time, or you want to take your current skills to the next level. This class will discuss approaches to both sequential art and stand-alone pin-ups, ranging from basics such as anatomy and perspective, to comic-specific versions of topics such as line and form, composition, rendering, screentoning, color, and tools of the trade. We will also cover story-specific points such as character design and world-building. (NOTE: Although these techniques are applicable for most kinds of comics, this class will be taught with slightly greater emphasis on manga, or Japanese sequential art.)


Prerequisites
Some basic drawing experience (formal art class experience not required.)

Comics and Manga II: Storytelling and Production
Teachers: Jennifer Fu

Sequential art (also known as comics or graphic novels) is a rich and complex art form that involves more than just superheroes and giant robots. Learn how to turn comic-style artwork into living and breathing comic stories. This class is split into two one-hour focus sessions; the first centers on sequential art storytelling, including panelling, page composition, angle shots, and final effects such as lettering and rendering. The second session walks through the comic production process step-by-step, from the concept and storyboarding to the final product and beyond. (NOTE: Although these techniques are applicable for most kinds of comics, this class will be taught with slightly greater emphasis on manga, or Japanese sequential art.)


Prerequisites
Basic drawing experience suggested, but not required

How to Grow Hair

In this class we will go through the step by step process of how to grow hair. There will be cookies. And guitars. And ninjas. And robots. And ninja robots playing guitars while eating cookies. And a ridiculous, ridiculous amount of hair.

Note: This class may actually contain factual data. Maybe.


Prerequisites
Desire to max-AMAZE your awesomely, awesome hair

Pulling the all-nighter
Teachers: Beth Schaffer

Learn strategies for pulling your 1st, 5th, or $$n$$th all-nighter. Coffee and Red Bull are not your only choices! Find out about all of the options at your disposal, from spicy food to a 2am jog. We'll also look at finding the right balance between energy and concentration, and under just what circumstances our all-nighter strategies should be employed.

Tasseography: Reading Tea Leaves
Teachers: Jennifer Hogan

Is the future your cup of tea?
The reading of tea leaves or coffee grounds developed separately in Asia, the Middle East, the Mediterranean, and the British Isles. The patterns in the left-over tea leaves can serve as a mental focus for divination and meditation. We'll talk about the origins of tea leaf reading, drink some tea, and practise some ourselves.

SET: a game with combinatorial possibilities
Teachers: Moji Jimoh

Learn how to play the game SET and explore some of the combinatorics behind the game.

Mystery Engineering
Teachers: Vrajesh Modi

This class is designed to challenge students to think on their feet. They will be given “building materials” and instructions to build a structure to meet certain parameters. The specific scoring criteria will be identified in the instructions, and could include height, weight, or strength–to-weight ratio.

(This class is based on the 2007 Science Olympiad Trial Event. Description adapted from soinc.org)

How to Draw Shiny Things
Teachers: Andrew Geng

Come learn some basics of drawing shiny things! After we talk about some ways to make things look shiny, you'll have a chance to apply what you've learned. If you've always wanted to know how to draw water, glass, metal, or even the shiny buttons in Mac OS X, this class is for you!

I'll provide white paper and a few colored pencils, but feel free to bring your own art materials.

1000+ Cranes in a Day
Teachers: Ada Ren

Learn to simplify the art of folding a paper crane into as few steps as possible and as quickly as possible.


Prerequisites
be able to fold a paper crane

Snowflakes!!
Teachers: Ada Ren

Snowflakes are small, pretty and melt in your hands. Why not make some bigger paper ones that won't melt? Oh, this is going to get complicated . . . (Bring scissors)

Being a Browncoat 101 - An Intro to the Firefly 'Verse
Teachers: Michael Lin

Fans of Firefly and/or Serenity are welcome, but those new to Firefly are especially encouraged to attend. A brief lecture/introduction to the concept and characters, followed by a randomly-selected episode from the series, followed by a discussion. Welcome to Firefly.

Note: If students are also registered for the "Make a Jayne Hat!" class, the relevant portion of "The Message" will also be shown to provide context.

Learn to Crochet
Teachers: Haneef Evans

Teaches the basics to crochet for left and right handed students.

Includes some of the basic stitches of Crocheting.

Didgeridoos: How to Build em' and Play em'
Teachers: Mikey Siegel

Ever heard of a Didgeridoo? Well, check it out: [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Didgeridoo]
Want to build your own and then learn how to play it? When this class is over you'll have a high quality Didge, better than any you'll find in a store, and all the knowledge you'll need to start playing it.

I'm also teaching a class on how to Circular Breathe, which lets you play the Didgeridoo without stopping for as long as you want. Its under Hobbies, and called "Learning to Exhale, Forever"


Prerequisites
Lips.

Learning to Exhale, Forever
Teachers: Mikey Siegel

Want to learn how to exhale, without stopping, EVER? Circular breathing [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circular_breathing] is a technique which allows you to constantly breath out through your mouth, while taking little inhales through your nose. In a way, you are breathing out and in at the same time. Why would someone want to do this? Playing the Didgeridoo, most wind instruments, impressing your friends.... and tons of other reasons which we can think of if you come to the class.

If you took my how to build a Didgeridoo class, bring your new instrument. If you don't have an instrument, that's totally fine. You don't need any special equipment to learn this skill.

Origami
Teachers: David Zou

Come learn to make cranes, frogs, flowers, and even an X-wing fighter with nothing but a square piece of paper.

It Doesn't Just Taste Good!
Teachers: Casey Dugan

In this class, we'll make sculptures out of chocolate! But, they'll look so good you won't want to eat them when you're through. In previous years students have come up with all kinds of creative designs: dragons, islands, scenes from books, space ships, turtles, houses, horses, abstract pieces, sunflowers, lily pads, chess boards, painters' palettes, breakfast, a clock, a wedding dress, three turkeys, and more. Candy bars don't count... :) Come with ideas or come up with something on the spot! Those with food allergies: Chocolate may contain peanuts or peanut products. Sorry. :(

It Doesn't Just Taste Good!
Teachers: Casey Dugan

In this class, we'll make sculptures out of chocolate! But, they'll look so good you won't want to eat them when you're through. In previous years students have come up with all kinds of creative designs: dragons, islands, scenes from books, space ships, turtles, houses, horses, abstract pieces, sunflowers, lily pads, chess boards, painters' palettes, breakfast, a clock, a wedding dress, three turkeys, and more. Candy bars don't count... :) Come with ideas or come up with something on the spot! Those with food allergies: Chocolate may contain peanuts or peanut products. Sorry. :(

It Doesn't Just Taste Good!
Teachers: Casey Dugan

In this class, we'll make sculptures out of chocolate! But, they'll look so good you won't want to eat them when you're through. In previous years students have come up with all kinds of creative designs: dragons, islands, scenes from books, space ships, turtles, houses, horses, abstract pieces, sunflowers, lily pads, chess boards, painters' palettes, breakfast, a clock, a wedding dress, three turkeys, and more. Candy bars don't count... :) Come with ideas or come up with something on the spot! Those with food allergies: Chocolate may contain peanuts or peanut products. Sorry. :(

It Doesn't Just Taste Good!
Teachers: Casey Dugan

In this class, we'll make sculptures out of chocolate! But, they'll look so good you won't want to eat them when you're through. In previous years students have come up with all kinds of creative designs: dragons, islands, scenes from books, space ships, turtles, houses, horses, abstract pieces, sunflowers, lily pads, chess boards, painters' palettes, breakfast, a clock, a wedding dress, three turkeys, and more. Candy bars don't count... :) Come with ideas or come up with something on the spot! Those with food allergies: Chocolate may contain peanuts or peanut products. Sorry. :(

Comic Book Appreciation

Do you love comics? Do you love manga? Do you think comic books are for kids? Are you interested in comics but don't know where to start? Do you read American comics, but have never touched Japanese comics, or vice versa? Do you like to look at pretty pictures? Do you like to read?
If you answered yes to any of these questions, you should take this class! Comics and manga have gotten pretty popular, and there's a lot of good ones out there. We'll discuss why comic books are awesome, what exactly is out there these days, and recommend some good titles for those who want to read more.
There may even be some comic books around to read in class

Gift Wrapping 101
Teachers: Mindy Eng

Gift wrapping technique and bow making tutorial in time for Christmas! **If possible, please bring a small stapler to class**

Origami!
Teachers: Laura Schuhrke

Folding paper is fun, but wouldn't it be nice to know how to make more than just a paper crane? Come learn how to make awsome stuff with brightly colored paper!

8.54 (πe)

Come learn how to make pie, just in time for Thanksgiving!

Design!
Teachers: Holly Greenberg

In this class you will be introduced to some basic design principles. We will examine various problems and try and brainstorm and design solutions!


Prerequisites
excitement about problem solving!

American Numismatics 101
Teachers: Chris Su

You'll never look at the dollar bills and the quarters in your pockets in the same way ever again. Guaranteed. :)


Prerequisites
Bring a dollar bill.

Chocolate 102
Teachers: Diane Rak

Let's explore the magical world of chocolate! After discovering the how's, when's, and where's of chocolate, we'll have a chance to try a variety of types and brands. (Lecture is followed by sampling.)

Class of the Dead
Teachers: Richard Prevost

Covering such topics as "Dilemmas in Undead Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good?" and "Chainsaw or Shotgun?", this course will give participants a complete view of all things zombie.

Field Guide to Fanfiction

**Excerpt from "This is it" by Kaitlynn Malfoy** taken off fanfiction.net

"So what are you going to do now?" Ginny said. "Are u gonna go get an abortion?"

"No I love Harry and I know he'll love me and our child. I just have to find away to tell him." said Hermione

. . .

"That's it Ginny thats just it, that's what I want, real true love like your parents have." Hermione was crying again now. "Or like Remus and Severus." Since Sirius died Remus and Snape had gradually become closer to each other and then they had announced they were in love. They had just got engaged and Hermione and the Weasleys were very happy for them. It had taken Harry much longer to get used to the idea of them being together, but he'd made the effort to build bridges. He wanted to see Remus happy, and if that meant him being with Snape, so be it. Harry was even starting to get used to calling Snape Severus now.

"Don't cry it's going to be OK, Harry loves you I know he does and he will love your baby as well." Ginny patted her on the back. "but you can't keep this a secret from him any longer."

"DUH I wasn't GOING to!" Hermione said "I just told you I'm going to tell him at lunch tomorrow."

--

This class will provide a detailed exploration of the anatomy of fan-fiction and its sub-genres. Examples will be taken from various texts, including the epic tales of Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter, and Neopets.


Prerequisites
Sense of Humor

Knex Weaponry

Knex, not just a fun toy, but also an excellent medium for weaponry. Guns to be specific. In this class we will build Knex guns using exclusively Knex pieces and rubber bands. You will be allowed to keep anything you build.


Prerequisites
A love of shooting stuff.

Elite/Top College Admissions Information Conference
Teachers: Steven Mo

If I want to get into MIT, Stanford, and/or Ivy League schools...How good should my SAT be? How important are leadership and extracurricular activities? Is financial cost really a problem even if I get in? How do I be "unique" and stand out on among all the other applications? How do I write good essays? Is there any chance for a B-average student? How do legacy and connection work? Should I even bother to apply? Is the college ranking really overrated? How about liberal arts schools vs. national universities? And, most importantly, any questions you want to ask will be answered in details!!!


Prerequisites
You have a dream school and you want to go there!

Drawing and Design
Teachers: Ilan Moyer

Learn some of the basics of drawing... everything from how to properly sharpen a pencil to designing with the golden ratio. The focus will be on drawing man-made objects, but the principles are applicable to drawing nature and people.

Please bring a compass, ruler, and eraser. Paper and pencils will be provided.

Simple Stuffed Pals
Teachers: Yan Huang

Come in and relax. We'll be hand sewing simple stuffed animals. Make a little pal for your backpack or key chain. It doesn't matter if your a sewing guru or you've never touched a needle before, everyone is welcome.

Cross Stitch Monograms
Teachers: Yan Huang

Cross stitch is a popular form of counted-thread embroidery in which X-shaped stitches are used to form a picture. It is also one of the world oldest forms of embroidery. Cross stitch is easy to learn and beautiful to look at.

Beginners and experts all welcome. I will give a short talk at the beginning about how cross stitching works, and then we will start our projects. We will be working with decorative cross stitch alphabets. You can bring a t-shirt or a handkerchief to monogram or I will also provide aida cloth for making little pouches for a cellphone or a T pass.

Locksmithing
Teachers: Sho Uemura

Learn about locks: how they work, how they are bypassed, and how they are picked. Lecture format.

Cook Your Own Thanksgiving
Teachers: Stephanie Bachar

Ready for two hours chock full of baking, broiling, chopping, and (most importantly) Thanksgiving? Cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie, sweet potatoes - these are all traditional Thanksgiving foods that we'll be cooking in this class (along with others). Hopefully you'll go home with a couple of new recipies to prepare for the Thursday after Splash!

Tie-Dye ANYTHING! (all day Saturday)
Teachers: Zandra Vinegar

Music and all the color you could ever want!
This is an open class, so register if you want to save an hour-block to dye a few things, or just stop by sometime during the first day of Splash. There will be white cotton shirts for $2 if you want to buy from us -- or you can always bring your own clothing - shirts, socks, sheets, lamp shades -- ANYTHING you want to tie-dye (although good luck tying the lamp shade). Tie it and dye it on the 17th and then just stop by to pick it up on the 18th. Don't know how to tie-dye? Don't worry, this is, after all, a class -- I'll walk you through it. If there's a space shortage, preference will be given to those who register, but stop by even if you only have 20 spare minutes). The class will run through lunch if you only have time then. No age limit. Parents welcome too. Hope to see you there! -- Zandra

Tie-Dye ANYTHING! (all day Saturday)
Teachers: Zandra Vinegar

Music and all the color you could ever want!
This is an open class, so register if you want to save an hour-block to dye a few things, or just stop by sometime during the first day of Splash. There will be white cotton shirts for $2 if you want to buy from us -- or you can always bring your own clothing - shirts, socks, sheets, lamp shades -- ANYTHING you want to tie-dye (although good luck tying the lamp shade). Tie it and dye it on the 17th and then just stop by to pick it up on the 18th. Don't know how to tie-dye? Don't worry, this is, after all, a class -- I'll walk you through it. If there's a space shortage, preference will be given to those who register, but stop by even if you only have 20 spare minutes). The class will run through lunch if you only have time then. No age limit. Parents welcome too. Hope to see you there! -- Zandra

Tie-Dye ANYTHING! (all day Saturday)
Teachers: Zandra Vinegar

Music and all the color you could ever want!
This is an open class, so register if you want to save an hour-block to dye a few things, or just stop by sometime during the first day of Splash. There will be white cotton shirts for $2 if you want to buy from us -- or you can always bring your own clothing - shirts, socks, sheets, lamp shades -- ANYTHING you want to tie-dye (although good luck tying the lamp shade). Tie it and dye it on the 17th and then just stop by to pick it up on the 18th. Don't know how to tie-dye? Don't worry, this is, after all, a class -- I'll walk you through it. If there's a space shortage, preference will be given to those who register, but stop by even if you only have 20 spare minutes). The class will run through lunch if you only have time then. No age limit. Parents welcome too. Hope to see you there! -- Zandra

Tie-Dye ANYTHING! (all day Saturday)
Teachers: Zandra Vinegar

Music and all the color you could ever want!
This is an open class, so register if you want to save an hour-block to dye a few things, or just stop by sometime during the first day of Splash. There will be white cotton shirts for $2 if you want to buy from us -- or you can always bring your own clothing - shirts, socks, sheets, lamp shades -- ANYTHING you want to tie-dye (although good luck tying the lamp shade). Tie it and dye it on the 17th and then just stop by to pick it up on the 18th. Don't know how to tie-dye? Don't worry, this is, after all, a class -- I'll walk you through it. If there's a space shortage, preference will be given to those who register, but stop by even if you only have 20 spare minutes). The class will run through lunch if you only have time then. No age limit. Parents welcome too. Hope to see you there! -- Zandra

Tie-Dye ANYTHING! (all day Saturday)
Teachers: Zandra Vinegar

Music and all the color you could ever want!
This is an open class, so register if you want to save an hour-block to dye a few things, or just stop by sometime during the first day of Splash. There will be white cotton shirts for $2 if you want to buy from us -- or you can always bring your own clothing - shirts, socks, sheets, lamp shades -- ANYTHING you want to tie-dye (although good luck tying the lamp shade). Tie it and dye it on the 17th and then just stop by to pick it up on the 18th. Don't know how to tie-dye? Don't worry, this is, after all, a class -- I'll walk you through it. If there's a space shortage, preference will be given to those who register, but stop by even if you only have 20 spare minutes). The class will run through lunch if you only have time then. No age limit. Parents welcome too. Hope to see you there! -- Zandra

Tie-Dye ANYTHING! (all day Saturday)
Teachers: Zandra Vinegar

Music and all the color you could ever want!
This is an open class, so register if you want to save an hour-block to dye a few things, or just stop by sometime during the first day of Splash. There will be white cotton shirts for $2 if you want to buy from us -- or you can always bring your own clothing - shirts, socks, sheets, lamp shades -- ANYTHING you want to tie-dye (although good luck tying the lamp shade). Tie it and dye it on the 17th and then just stop by to pick it up on the 18th. Don't know how to tie-dye? Don't worry, this is, after all, a class -- I'll walk you through it. If there's a space shortage, preference will be given to those who register, but stop by even if you only have 20 spare minutes). The class will run through lunch if you only have time then. No age limit. Parents welcome too. Hope to see you there! -- Zandra

Tie-Dye ANYTHING! (all day Saturday)
Teachers: Zandra Vinegar

Music and all the color you could ever want!
This is an open class, so register if you want to save an hour-block to dye a few things, or just stop by sometime during the first day of Splash. There will be white cotton shirts for $2 if you want to buy from us -- or you can always bring your own clothing - shirts, socks, sheets, lamp shades -- ANYTHING you want to tie-dye (although good luck tying the lamp shade). Tie it and dye it on the 17th and then just stop by to pick it up on the 18th. Don't know how to tie-dye? Don't worry, this is, after all, a class -- I'll walk you through it. If there's a space shortage, preference will be given to those who register, but stop by even if you only have 20 spare minutes). The class will run through lunch if you only have time then. No age limit. Parents welcome too. Hope to see you there! -- Zandra

Tie-Dye ANYTHING! (all day Saturday)
Teachers: Zandra Vinegar

Music and all the color you could ever want!
This is an open class, so register if you want to save an hour-block to dye a few things, or just stop by sometime during the first day of Splash. There will be white cotton shirts for $2 if you want to buy from us -- or you can always bring your own clothing - shirts, socks, sheets, lamp shades -- ANYTHING you want to tie-dye (although good luck tying the lamp shade). Tie it and dye it on the 17th and then just stop by to pick it up on the 18th. Don't know how to tie-dye? Don't worry, this is, after all, a class -- I'll walk you through it. If there's a space shortage, preference will be given to those who register, but stop by even if you only have 20 spare minutes). The class will run through lunch if you only have time then. No age limit. Parents welcome too. Hope to see you there! -- Zandra

Wading through the bias
Teachers: Beth Schaffer

Interested in world events? Want to be able to hold your own in intelligent topical debate? Just want to be an informed citizen? Unfortunately, it's not as easy to do so as it may seem. Just watching the news or reading the paper won't necessarily give you an accurate idea of what's actually going on. Most news media is fraught with intentional and unintentional biases that are all too easy to take on as your own. Come to this class to learn to spot these biases and how to determine what actually happened when every news source twists the story one way or another.

Paper Airplanes 101

Ever wanted to fly your own plane? Now you can! We'll show you how to make several kinds of paper airplanes, as well as explain a little about what makes them fly.

Introduction to European Games

Tired of Monopoly, Taboo and Trivial Pursuit? This class will introduce "European-style" board games, which range from monks in a monastery trying to solve a murder mystery to settling an island to building Arabian palaces. These games are social, fun and themed while still incorporating interesting strategy. We'll explore several varieties of European games, including some specific examples, and examine sources for these games. This class will include, of course, a "games tasting" session, where we will break into groups and play some of these games.

Sixty Murderous Minutes of Mafia
Teachers: Eva Cheung, R Tharu

It's a bright and sunny morning in Pleasantville (or, well, MIT), and all its residents (that would be you, come November) are happily running around--except one. Some poor unfortunate soul is lying, somewhere, dead.

Who is it? More importantly--who was the killer? Join us for a game to find out.

Type is Cool: Introduction to Font Design
Teachers: LJ Joyner

We'll warm up a bit by drawing some letters of all kinds. Then I'll provide a short history of letterforms, alphabets and orthographies, from ancient times to the invention of the printing press and up to the most modern digital type design technologies, and give a very short introduction to the practice of designing a font. After that, you'll get a chance to start designing a font of your own, using some of the techniques that you've learned.

The original origami
Teachers: Annie Kwon

Learn how to make crane, box, camera, flower, chair, just about anything. You name it!

Learn Tolkien's Elvish
Teachers: Susan Shepherd

If you liked the books, the movie, or the assorted paintings that have been done based on J.R.R. Tolkien's world of Middle Earth, this class might be for you. Learn how to pronounce the Sindarin form of the Elvish language, including how to spell it out using Tengwar (the writing alphabet), and learn a few basic words and phrases.

The Science of "Dating"

An entertaining course that teaches students the etiquettes of dating in our contemporary society. Course will include fun quizzes, anecdotes, jokes, a powerpoint presentation, and games.

Rubiks Cube in 5 Easy steps! Class II

Learn to solve a Rubiks Cube! This will be exciting - you never know you can solve one under 3 minutes unless you try! A two-hour workshop for a lifetime skill. Come learn and stun your friends!(We have Class I and Class II - choose the one that best fits your time. Please bring your cube if you have one)

YOU Can Fly!

You CAN fly!

Have you ever dreamed of flying airplanes? What training do you need to fly? What are the fun things you can do with a pilot's license?

This class will include a little bit of everything about flying - how airplanes fly, how YOU can learn to fly airplanes when you get older, what tasks a pilot completes over the course of a normal flight, and, most importantly, lots of answers to your questions about flying and learning to fly!

This class is taught by a licensed pilot, and, if the class size allows, students will have the opportunity to use charts, plotters, and other tools in actually learning how to plan a flight!

Introductory Dark Chocolate Tasting
Teachers: Meghan Reedy

So you like chocolate. A lot. You even have a favorite brand. (Hersheys? Nestle? Dove?) But it's all just chocolate, right? Wrong! There's a lot more to chocolate than what you buy in the grocery store. There are gradations of how dark it is, different types of beans, even chocolate made from beans all from the same country or even the same plantation! And they all have distinctive tastes. We'll have a range of different chocolates, as well as information about the different types of chocolate. We'll explore several different aspects of high-quality chocolate (such as percentage cocoa contents, and what country it comes from) and discuss what these things do to the flavor. We'll also bring some suggestions for where to look for buying your own chocolate.

Note: Although younger students may take this class, please make sure they can sit still and join in a reasonable discussion. Anyone being rowdy will be asked to leave.

Introductory Dark Chocolate Tasting
Teachers: Meghan Reedy

So you like chocolate. A lot. You even have a favorite brand. (Hersheys? Nestle? Dove?) But it's all just chocolate, right? Wrong! There's a lot more to chocolate than what you buy in the grocery store. There are gradations of how dark it is, different types of beans, even chocolate made from beans all from the same country or even the same plantation! And they all have distinctive tastes. We'll have a range of different chocolates, as well as information about the different types of chocolate. We'll explore several different aspects of high-quality chocolate (such as percentage cocoa contents, and what country it comes from) and discuss what these things do to the flavor. We'll also bring some suggestions for where to look for buying your own chocolate.

Note: Although younger students may take this class, please make sure they can sit still and join in a reasonable discussion. Anyone being rowdy will be asked to leave.

Learn to Embroider
Teachers: Meghan Reedy

Ever looked at an embroidery piece and wondered how it's done? Now's your chance to learn! It's easy and fun, and great for working on in front of the TV or to stay awake in class. We'll be working on counted cross stitch, a particular type of embroidering. Plus, you'll get your own small piece to make.

In the first hour, I'll show you the basics of counted cross stitching, and get you started on a simple beginner's kit. The second hour is optional, and you're more than welcome to stay and ask questions or keep working on your kit. I'll be on hand to help out.

Introduction to Go!
Teachers: Yuri Lin, Daniel Whalen

Learn to play go, the abstract (and really pretty!) strategy game that was created in China thousands of years ago. Come learn the rules of the game and some very basic strategy, and try your hand at a few games! (Disclaimer: if you already know some theory or strategy of go, this class is probably not for you.)

Beginning Swing: Moves Galore
Teachers: David Zou

They say that it's not about how many move you know, but how well you do them, but let's face it, new moves are just simply more exciting. Come learn to swing starting with a plethora of moves: waist turns, sugar pushes, and pretzel turns. No previous experience require, all are welcome. Especially males.

Embroider Anything: Pattern Design and Workshop
Teachers: Kimberly Beder

Embroidery is the art of making designs on cloth. Almost all embroidery projects require a pattern - but what if you can't find the pattern you want? This class will cover the process of creating embroidered art, from pattern creation to simple stitches. Everyone will be able to make their own pattern and to begin their own embroidery project which you can take home to finish. Pre-made patterns will also be available to study.

Students should bring pictures of things they might like to design a pattern for!

An Introduction to Practical Knotwork

An interactive introduction to the construction and use of knots from sailing, and climbing.

illustration: the small book
Teachers: Alana Rivera

A book can be filled with words, and pictures, in varying quantities. In this course we will work to create a small book and use a simple binding technique.


Prerequisites
creativity

Ramencraft

Playing with food is an activity with a long and glorious history. From the very first cave paintings of steak-tossing, to the more modern pastimes of salad bowling and produce bocce, people the world over have long enjoyed making meals both fun and nutritional.

In this class, we'll be exploring the art of ramen noodle sculpture. In particular, we will be working with a soften-and-dry technique with wire reinforcement. Ramen noodles will be provided - come with ideas for designs!

Introduction To Voice Recording and Digital Audio Editing

After learning microphone and voice technique, practice hands on recording and then edit the audio for the perfect voice recording.

Photography Experience

This class will take you through the whole process of photography from taking pictures to developing to printing.

We'll start off the morning with some basic principles that you should keep in mind while you're taking pictures. After that you'll have the rest of the Saturday morning session to take pictures.

We'll reconvene in the afternoon and develop the film from the morning session. We'll leave the film out overnight to dry.

Finally, we'll reconvene on Sunday and teach you how to print. At the end of two days you'll have prints to take home to share your Splash experience with all your friends!

Note: You do not have to have your own (film, not digital) camera to take this course (though if you have one, please bring it!)

Nutrition with a plant-based diet
Teachers: Lisa Danz

Depending on whom you ask, being vegan or vegetarian will kill you or save you. It will be easy or hard. I'll try not to give you an answer to these questions, although I can tell you from experience what it's like to be vegan for a year. Instead of giving my opinion, I'll present some of the studies and arguments regarding plant-based food and how it interacts with your body.

Poi Workshop (Beginner)

Top 10 Reasons to Spin Poi:
10. It's good exercise!
9. It makes people try really hard not to stare at you.
8. It lets you create complicated, technical patterns and fool people into thinking you can dance.
7. It lets you play with toys and fool people into thinking you can dance.
6. Why not?
5. It's the most fun you will ever have with a pair of socks.
4. It's an excuse to think about physics!
3. It's actually a great way to dance to music.
2. Procrastination.
1. It's an excuse to play with fire!

For those of you that wanted a real explanation, go here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poi_%28juggling%29

For those of you who think a YouTube video is worth 1000 Wikis, go here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VCcLZUT81Lw


Prerequisites
At least one hand

Card Throwing
Teachers: Kevin Hwang

Learn how to throw ordinary playing cards!


Prerequisites
wrists

Card Throwing
Teachers: Kevin Hwang

Learn how to throw ordinary playing cards!


Prerequisites
wrists

Chess Challenges

Good in chess? Mate in 3? Mate in 4? Come play the most exciting chess puzzles and win prizes!


Prerequisites
Know how to play chess

Poi Workshop (Advanced)

In only one hour, we will transform you from an average three-beat-weaver into a poi prodigy!

Seriously, you'll be this guy:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mwGyTK789zE

(People who have attended a beginner workshop are welcome to attend!)


Prerequisites
Some previous experience spinning

Poi Workshop (Beginner)

Top 10 Reasons to Spin Poi:
10. It's good exercise!
9. It makes people try really hard not to stare at you.
8. It lets you create complicated, technical patterns and fool people into thinking you can dance.
7. It lets you play with toys and fool people into thinking you can dance.
6. Why not?
5. It's the most fun you will ever have with a pair of socks.
4. It's an excuse to think about physics!
3. It's actually a great way to dance to music.
2. Procrastination.
1. It's an excuse to play with fire!

For those of you that wanted a real explanation, go here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poi_%28juggling%29

For those of you who think a YouTube video is worth 1000 Wikis, go here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VCcLZUT81Lw


Prerequisites
At least one hand

How to Sleep in Class
Teachers: Kevin Hwang, Sho Uemura

The average high school student spends about 30 hours a week in school, and 10 to 15 hours a week in extracurricular activities (Source: Internet). That's something like 8 hours a day, spent in class!

Completely incidentally, sleep researchers suggest getting at least 8 hours of sleep daily. But where can a busy student find the time to get sleep?

We have studied this topic extensively, and we believe we have a solution. Join us as we explore this exciting new field of research!

Card Throwing
Teachers: Kevin Hwang

Learn how to throw ordinary playing cards!


Prerequisites
wrists

Card Throwing
Teachers: Kevin Hwang

Learn how to throw ordinary playing cards!


Prerequisites
wrists

Introductory Dog Training

Teach your dog, present or future, how to do stuff! We'll cover basic commands, good behavior and a few dance moves (what's the point of having a dog if you can't teach it to dance?). A certified AKC Canine Good Citizen will be provided for the duration of the class. People with serious pet allergies should not attend.

Spiral Paper Gift Cards
Teachers: Stephanie Bachar

Have you ever wanted to personalize cards to friends and family? In this class you'll learn an awesome gift card making technique that incorperates a 3D, multicolor background in nearly unlimited shapes!

Baking Stuff
Teachers: Jessy McQuaw

Cookies, Apple pie, Cakes, Brownies?
I dunno. I'll grab some ingredients and some recipes, and we'll see how it goes.

Urban Orienteering
Teachers: Alex Jiang

So you've seen the crazy lego-like Simmons dorm and the earthquake shaken Stata Center. Do you want to get to know the MIT campus even more? Welcome to Urban Orienteering! Equipped with only a map and your sense of direction, you must race your way through all the checkpoints across over campus. Traditionally, orienteering is done in parks, on and off trail. We will be doing the same thing on the MIT campus except instead of having a compass as your guide, you will be using your surroundings to help you. And of course there will be a special something for the fastest teams!!

Nethack!
Teachers: Nelson Elhage

Come, take on the role of a bold `@', and descend into the depths of the Dungeons of Doom, where you will face the likes of the vicious `x', the fearsome `h', and the mighty `D'. Collect $, % and !, and equip your [ and ) for battle.

nethack is one of the most classic text-based computer games of all time. A forerunner of Diablo, Neverwinter Nights and their ilk, it contains far more depth and complexity than nearly any modern game, with none of the pointless graphics, and still draws many devoted fans. Come find out what the craze is about!

Hair Dyeing 101

This class will teach you some of the basic techniques you need to know for the art of hair dyeing. This is a lab class with hands on experience, so wear clothes that you don't mind getting colorful. While it is not required that you leave the class with dyed hair, it is strongly recommended.

Truffles Making 101
Teachers: Kendra Beckler

Truffles are layered chocolates, with soft, milky chocolate (called "ganache") surrounded by a hard chocolate shell. We will examine and practice the delicate, delicious art of making truffles. Students go home with their creations.

Truffles Making 101
Teachers: Kendra Beckler

Truffles are layered chocolates, with soft, milky chocolate (called "ganache") surrounded by a hard chocolate shell. We will examine and practice the delicate, delicious art of making truffles. Students go home with their creations.

How to Racewalk
Teachers: Natasha Plotkin

Thought the longest Olympic event was the marathon? Actually, it's the 50 kilometer (about 31 mile) racewalk. Racewalk, if you've never heard of it before, is exactly what it sounds like--a very efficient form of walking that allows walkers to compete at high speeds--around a 6:00 minute mile among elite walkers. And, though racewalk is not a popular sport in the U.S., opportunities abound for high school athletes who compete, including competitions around the world for those who make the Junior National Team. In this class, come learn how to race walk! It's a great way to get in shape, cross train, or, if you get hooked like I did, an awesome sport to compete in. Sneakers are encouraged.

The Art of Chain Mail
Teachers: Jacky Chang

A long time ago, when things were more hardcore, people actually tried to kill each other with swords. Those who didn't want to be killed defended themselves with things like armor and chain mail. Come learn a few of the weaves they used for this, and a few that they didn't. You might even get to try out a few cooler things.

Star Trek: Irritation

Why do they still use the Holodeck after so many malfunctions? Why are ensigns the only ones to be vaporized on away missions? And who ever thought Deep Space Nine was a good idea?

Star Trek: Irritation will give Trekkies a chance to spout off about what in the Trek universe gets their Heisenberg compensators out of whack. Come and talk in a supportive, therapeutic enviroment about everything that annoys you, from Starfleet's curious lack of spacesuits, to time travel, and Wesley Crusher. We will also be discussing Denebian slime devils, Kirk vs. Picard, and Chakotay...while exploring important topics like theology, the destiny of mankind, and Riker's beard.

A firm grasp of the Star Trek universe is highly recommended. This class is for geeks and geeks at heart.

Nethack!
Teachers: Nelson Elhage

Come, take on the role of a bold `@', and descend into the depths of the Dungeons of Doom, where you will face the likes of the vicious `x', the fearsome `h', and the mighty `D'. Collect $, % and !, and equip your [ and ) for battle.

nethack is one of the most classic text-based computer games of all time. A forerunner of Diablo, Neverwinter Nights and their ilk, it contains far more depth and complexity than nearly any modern game, with none of the pointless graphics, and still draws many devoted fans. Come find out what the craze is about!

Magic 101 - Card Tricks
Teachers: Kevin Brokish

Learn to perform mind-blowing card tricks! No experience necessary: we'll start with the basic, essential moves that are common to many tricks. Then we'll use those moves to perform some of the astonishing card tricks that professional street magicians do.

(I added this 2nd section since the first filled up)

Mystery Engineering
Teachers: Vrajesh Modi

This class is designed to challenge students to think on their feet. They will be given “building materials” and instructions to build a structure to meet certain parameters. The specific scoring criteria will be identified in the instructions, and could include height, weight, or strength–to-weight ratio.

(This class is based on the 2007 Science Olympiad Trial Event. Description adapted from soinc.org)

Wading through the bias
Teachers: Beth Schaffer

Interested in world events? Want to be able to hold your own in intelligent topical debate? Just want to be an informed citizen? Unfortunately, it's not as easy to do so as it may seem. Just watching the news or reading the paper won't necessarily give you an accurate idea of what's actually going on. Most news media is fraught with intentional and unintentional biases that are all too easy to take on as your own. Come to this class to learn to spot these biases and how to determine what actually happened when every news source twists the story one way or another.

Beginning Swing: Moves Galore
Teachers: David Zou

They say that it's not about how many move you know, but how well you do them, but let's face it, new moves are just simply more exciting. Come learn to swing starting with a plethora of moves: waist turns, sugar pushes, and pretzel turns. No previous experience require, all are welcome. Especially males.


Prerequisites
none

Class of the Dead 2
Teachers: Richard Prevost

Covering such topics as "Dilemmas in Undead Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good?" and "Chainsaw or Shotgun?", this course will give participants a complete view of all things zombie.

Learn Tolkien's Elvish
Teachers: Susan Shepherd

Due to interest in the subject, we will be running a second class!
If you liked the books, the movie, or the assorted paintings that have been done based on J.R.R. Tolkien's world of Middle Earth, this class might be for you. Learn how to pronounce the Sindarin form of the Elvish language, including how to spell it out using Tengwar (the writing alphabet), and learn a few basic words and phrases.


Prerequisites
none

How to Draw Shiny Things
Teachers: Andrew Geng

Come learn some basics of drawing shiny things! After we talk about some ways to make things look shiny, you'll have a chance to apply what you've learned. If you've always wanted to know how to draw water, glass, metal, or even the shiny buttons in Mac OS X, this class is for you!

I'll provide white paper and a few colored pencils, but feel free to bring your own art materials.

Root Beer Tasting

Take a brief tour of the wide world of root beer. If you think that root beer is just another carbonated beverage, sign up and taste root beer from a keg!


Prerequisites
none

Tie-Dye ANYTHING! (all day Saturday) Closed!
Teachers: Zandra Vinegar

Music and all the color you could ever want!
This is an open class, so register if you want to save an hour-block to dye a few things, or just stop by sometime during the first day of Splash. There will be white cotton shirts for $2 if you want to buy from us -- or you can always bring your own clothing - shirts, socks, sheets, lamp shades -- ANYTHING you want to tie-dye (although good luck tying the lamp shade). Tie it and dye it on the 17th and then just stop by to pick it up on the 18th. Don't know how to tie-dye? Don't worry, this is, after all, a class -- I'll walk you through it. If there's a space shortage, preference will be given to those who register, but stop by even if you only have 20 spare minutes). The class will run through lunch if you only have time then. No age limit. Parents welcome too. Hope to see you there! -- Zandra

Tie-Dye ANYTHING! (all day Saturday) Closed!
Teachers: Zandra Vinegar

Music and all the color you could ever want!
This is an open class, so register if you want to save an hour-block to dye a few things, or just stop by sometime during the first day of Splash. There will be white cotton shirts for $2 if you want to buy from us -- or you can always bring your own clothing - shirts, socks, sheets, lamp shades -- ANYTHING you want to tie-dye (although good luck tying the lamp shade). Tie it and dye it on the 17th and then just stop by to pick it up on the 18th. Don't know how to tie-dye? Don't worry, this is, after all, a class -- I'll walk you through it. If there's a space shortage, preference will be given to those who register, but stop by even if you only have 20 spare minutes). The class will run through lunch if you only have time then. No age limit. Parents welcome too. Hope to see you there! -- Zandra


Liberal Arts

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Days of the Wolves of Mibu: Shinsengumi!
Teachers: Jennifer Yoo

They lived in a tumultuous time and became national heroes in a single night. Their swords were feared by countless revolutionaries. Their names were carved in stone and in the hearts and imagination of many. But just who were these great men called the Shinsengumi? Find out here! Learn about the real Wolves of Mibu, and how they compare to their media counterparts. New and improved from Splash 2006, you won't just hear their stories - you'll relive them.

Legends of the Samurai and Ninja
Teachers: Jennifer Yoo

Hear the stories of some of the greatest samurai and ninja that ever lived. Discover the legends of how the ninja came to be, and what glory truly means to a samurai.

True History Behind Samurai Anime
Teachers: Jennifer Yoo

Who is Oda Nobunaga? Was Himura Kenshin real? Was Saitou Hajime actually left-handed and did he really like plain soba noodles? Learn the answers and a whole lot more in "True History Behind Samurai Anime." Find out what's true and what's not in some of your favorite Japanese historical series. Show your friends there's more to shows like Rurouni Kenshin, Samurai Deeper Kyo, and Samurai Champloo than clashing swords. Bring questions and maybe a notebook and pen; learning history has never been this fun!

Oratory!
Teachers: Roshini Zachariah

"To be or not to be...."

"I have a dream..."

Speeches are powerful things - verbal communication is one of the most important ways that we can provoke reactions. Any good oration has two necessary components - the text itself and the way it is delivered. In an hour, we will ORATE famous speeches, all types of poetry from Petrarchan sonnets to e.e. cummings to 'Howl' and even do a little folk singing.

Leave your whispering voices at home!


Prerequisites
A voice.

Baseball and Philosophy
Teachers: Anthony Rindone

You do not need to be a die-hard fan of baseball to enjoy what it can teach us. Everything from the "three strikes and you're out" principle to the conflict between "team performance" and "individual glory" will be discussed and debated in a forum setting. A list of topics will be presented, and no prior knowledge of baseball history required. Students are encouraged to bring their own topics that they're interested in debating.

The Sonnet
Teachers: Lance Ozier

The sonnet is one of the oldest and most durable forms of poetry. It’s been used by great poets from Shakespeare to e. e. cummings. Because it has certain rules, it poses creative challenges for any poet, but as a result can yield poems that astonish and delight. Come see how poets have met the challenges and reaped the rewards over the past 400 years.

Glorious Music
Teachers: Lance Ozier

Sure, you've heard of Beethoven and Bach. We'll start there, but move quickly to some of the most glorious orchestral music of the 20th century, including pieces by Orff, Stravinsky, Ravel, Respighi, Gershwin, and Puccini.

How to Read a Poem
Teachers: Lance Ozier

Have you ever read a poem and wondered what the heck is going on? Or, to paraphrase the poet T. S. Eliot, have you “had the experience but missed the meaning”? In this class you will learn some simple ways to make more sense of the poems you read.

A quick introduction to the Arabic language
Teachers: Ammar Ammar

Learn the basics of Arabic and get to hear some good Arabic music =-)


Prerequisites
A smile

Learn Ancient Greek!
Teachers: Dygo Tosa

Ancient Greek is an amazing language with its very own alphabet that is very much alive in our world today. While you may not hear anyone speaking Ancient Greek fluently, it is a language that you can find buried in English words everywhere. Many science and medical terms are based on Greek roots and learning Greek can really improve your vocabulary- which might come in handy the next time you’re playing a trivia game or taking a standardized test! Greek is also the beautiful language Homer’s epics are written in, among many other great works of literature.

This course begins by learning the Greek alphabet, goes on to explore some elements of how the language is put together, and finishes by students reading lines from Homer’s Odyssey. No previous knowledge of Greek required.

Introduction to Poetry
Teachers: Susan Shepherd

Are you interested in poetry, but never had a chance to read good poems in school? Bored with poetry but want to change that before AP English Lit next year? There is a solution!

We will discuss reasons for writing and reading poems, common forms (rhyme scheme, meter, free verse and other styles), what makes a particular poem endure or fade away, and briefly touch on the history of several poems. Students will have a chance to discuss the kinds of poetry, subjects, and poetry writing styles that they smile or frown at.

The last half hour of the class will be dedicated to giving students the chance to hear good poetry read aloud. Students will be given a list of approximately thirty poems and the chance to choose which ones they would like to hear. Featured poems will include works by Kipling, Cummings, Angelou, Housman, Frost, Dickenson, and Nye, among others. Note: this class is oriented toward discussion and lecture, so students will not have a chance to work on their own poetry in class, although experience writing poetry is a plus.


Prerequisites
An interest in poetry or English

Beginner Latin I
Teachers: Jean Cui

This course will teach the very basics of beginner Latin. For slightly more advanced beginner Latin, please see Beginner Latin II.
Topics covered will include first and second declension nouns, and first and second conjugation verbs in the present, imperfect, and future tenses. There will also be some Roman culture, some Roman history, some Latin words, and some English words derived from the Latin language. The Roman history will probably be a very basic history of the beginnings of Rome and the Roman Republic (around 753 B.C. to around 31 B.C.).


Prerequisites
There are no prerequisites; all students interested in Latin are welcome.

Beginner Latin II
Teachers: Jean Cui

This is a continuation of Beginner Latin I. Topics covered will include regular third declension (non i-stem) nouns, and third, third -io, and fourth conjugation verbs in the present, imperfect, and future tenses. There will be some Roman culture and some Roman history not covered in Beginner Latin I. This Roman history will probably be a very basic history of the Roman Empire (around 31 B.C. to around 476 A.D.) There will also be some not previously-covered Latin words and words derived from the English language.


Prerequisites
Knowledge of first and second declension nouns, knowledge of first and second conjugation verbs in the present, imperfect, and future tenses.

How to Order Lunch in Athens!

Technology! Democracy! Feta cheese! Where on Earth do these words come from? Greece!

Although it has existed in several different forms throughout its history, Greek is an historic language, an academic language, a language through which many of the fundamental principles of human civilization were defined. This course discusses the Greek roots of a few common English words and also introduces students to the unique energy and color of modern Greek in both its written and spoken forms.

After the class, students will be able to order lunch in Athens for themselves!

Being Rude in Japanese
Teachers: Colin McSwiggen

So you know a little Japanese. If you've studied the language in any depth, you've probably noticed something annoying: all the sentences in your textbook seem to end in "desu" or "masu," and your teacher goes on and on about how you should use "polite" rather than "plain" speech to avoid offending anybody.

"Well," you think, "that's frustrating. What if I WANT to offend someone?"

After taking this class, you'll be able to! You'll learn to pick fights, insult your enemies, talk down to your underlings, and roll your R's like a yakuza boss (or at least like an actor playing one). Come learn some Japanese that you should never use in Japan.

I'll touch on a couple advanced grammar topics, so at least a year's worth of high-school level Japanese is highly recommended. You'll probably want to bring something to take notes.


Prerequisites
An understanding of Japanese equivalent at least one year's worth of high school study.

Egyptian Hieroglyphs
Teachers: Melissa Kaufman

How did we get from a bunch of "random" symbols to being able to read and understand Egyptian hieroglyphics? Thanks mostly to Jean-Francois Champollion and the Rosetta Stone (among other people and objects), we are now able to accomplish that task. We will talk about the process of decipherment and be able to read some hieroglyphs in this class.

Argumentation Theory and Debate!

Have you ever been in a discussion? Do you want to improve your oral skills? Come and learn the basics of argumentative theory, body language and general stuff you want to know when speaking to audiences!

Design Synectics
Teachers: Ada Ren

Spark the left side of your brain. Think more creatively through the use of analogies and personal experiences.

Rock Your College Applications
Teachers: Chris Su

Stumped by the pages and pages of blank bubbles that you have to fill in? Parents yelling at you to finish those apps? Have six weeks left until Jan 1 deadline?

No worries. The solution is here. Come and find out :)

Contents: SAT/GPA/AP, activities, essays, recommendations, interview, financial aid, Common App...and more!


Prerequisites
Seniors only.

Thinking About College Applications
Teachers: Chris Su

Don't know why you're taking SATs? Confused about what colleges to be looking at? Sick of hearing seniors complain about their apps?

Junior year is the best year in HS to start thinking about college applications, because there is still plenty of time to take exams and define your priorities. Come and learn strategies of making the most out of your junior year, plus strategies for senior year (you won't regret it :)).

Contents: Testing info, defining priorities, college overview, summer programs, extracurricular activities...and more!


Prerequisites
Juniors only.

Architecture 101
Teachers: Diane Rak, ana malagon

We will walk you through the steps on how to plan, draw, and construct your very own edible structures using real architectural terms and concepts.

Introduction to Postmodern Philosophy
Teachers: Kenan Diab

What exactly is postmodernism? What is it a response to? Why does it seem so difficult to understand? These questions and more will be answered in this survey of the postmodern landscape from a philosophical perspective: an explanation of some ideas from contemporary authors who challenge fundamental assumptions about the world that we take for granted.

Yiddish On One Foot
Teachers: Meena Viswanath

This is a course that will cover some basics of Yiddish grammar and vocabulary. No guarantee will be made as to the level of fluency at the end of the course, but it will be fun!

Arabic Writing
Teachers: Lana Awad

learn the basics of the Arabic writing, some words, and how to write your name.

Poems for Fun
Teachers: Susan Shepherd

Haikus can be fun
But sometimes they don't make sense
Refrigerator
- Author Unknown

Looking for poems to bring a smile to your face? Tired of old musty love poems blathering on about the princess's eyebrow, and boring English guys writing about the current weather? This class hopes to introduce you to funny poems, including ironic poetry, haikus, very short poetry, and riddles.

Bring Out Your Dead! The Black Death and It's Affect on Europe

The Black Death was one of the deadliest plagues in human history. It swept through Europe sporadically throughout the Middle Ages and Renaissance, leaving great death, and also great change in its wake. In this class, we will study both what the plague was and how it affected the course of European History. This class will include a lecture section and a discussion section.


Prerequisites
Participants should be familiar with basic historic concepts, like the Renaissance and the Reformation.

Off With Her Head! The French Revolution and the Reign of Terror

Why did the French revolt against the king in 1789? How did they succeed? And why did they need to cut off so many people's heads? After a lesson, we will discuss how the French Revolution appplies to modern-day politics, and what we can learn from it.


Prerequisites
A basic knowledge of current affairs and European History.

Antoni Gaudí's Masterful Architecture
Teachers: Jessie Mueller

His buildings looks like they came straight from a Dr. Seuss book, and surrealist Dalí was a big fan. Gaudí, however, was inspired by the natural, not the imaginative. Come learn about the most famous architect of Barcelona.

Writing Straight A Papers!!!
Teachers: Amy Moolten

I want to help you to write straight A papers and prepare you for academic success in college! In this workshop, you will learn how to forge a strong thesis statement, craft effective supporting arguments, place powerful verbs in your sentences, improve your overall grammar and vocabulary, and most importantly drive your point home for victory! If you already know how to write but you want to turn that B into an A, this workshop can help with that too. We will pick some fun topics together as a group, formulate thesis statements based on your own personal views of the topics you selected, and build outlines with supporting topic sentences. Once basic outlines have been formed, you will take some time on your own to fill in the meat of it on your favorite topic using web resources and your creative thinking skills. I will help out with some individual coaching as you dive in to the guts of it and start to craft your masterpiece. Finally, we will all come together as a group, talk about strong sentence structures and effective verbs, and do a bit of editing. We will also talk about how to refine your intro to invite the reader's interest with some crafty techniques and how to use the conclusion to drive your thesis home with a personal flare. Then, we will break out for another short period and you can tweak to perfection! If there is time, we can talk about the boring part, bibliography and references as well...Hopefully by the end of this workshop, you will have crafted a rock solid straight A masterpiece on a fun topic of your choosing! At the very least, you will know how to write one!!! I look forward to seeing you all there.


Prerequisites
Some experience writing papers for school

A Crash Course in Shakespeare
Teachers: Catherine Kruchten

Ever realized how little we actually know about the man who wrote Hamlet? We'll discuss the sparse pieces of Shakespeare's life and provide a brief introduction into a few of his plays. No prior knowledge necessary.

A Crash Course in Shakespeare
Teachers: Catherine Kruchten

Ever realized how little we actually know about the man who wrote Hamlet? We'll discuss the sparse pieces of Shakespeare's life and provide a brief introduction into a few of his plays. No prior knowledge necessary.

Introduction to American Sign Language
Teachers: Alice Ohlson

This class will be a brief introduction to American Sign Language (ASL), a language used by over half a million Americans. I hope to show you what a unique, fascinating, and beautiful language ASL is.

Introduction to American Sign Language
Teachers: Alice Ohlson

This class will be a brief introduction to American Sign Language (ASL), a language used by over half a million Americans. I hope to show you what a unique, fascinating, and beautiful language ASL is.

A Crash Course in Rock
Teachers: Josh Bails

Starting to discover music? Trying to convince your parents to let you go to concerts? This course will give you a basic overview of essential as well as commonly overlooked bands from various eras in rock (60's, 70's, 90's grunge, 90's indie, modern rock, modern indie) to start you off on the right foot for discovering your own music tastes.

Playwriting
Teachers: Daniel Zaharopol

Drama has great power. It's one thing to read a book, where you're separated from the characters by words, or to see a movie, where the action is on a flat screen, with the actors themselves thousands of miles away in Hollywood. It's another thing entirely to see good actors on stage in front of you, to connect on a visceral level with real people who are right there. But writing for the theater is hard. It needs to sound authentic, but it also needs to move the plot forwards. Characters must be true to themselves and each other. Each scene must have a point, it must have action, it must be engaging. Come join us as we explore some excerpts from plays, write our own short scenes, and discuss what it is that goes into a good play. If you've written any kind of play (or just a short scene) before, you are encouraged to bring several copies. But this class is open to anyone, including and especially those who have never written before!

Playwriting II
Teachers: Daniel Zaharopol

How do characters listen to each other? What drives a scene to be successful?

We're going to study characters and goals. We'll see how goals inform characters, and how to use characters to drive the power of a scene.

To take this class, you must have taken Playwriting I. In that class, I'll ask you to write a little bit ahead of time for this class, so set aside a little time to write a scene to share.

[This class is given by "popular demand" after successful Playwriting I classes in previous years!]


Prerequisites
Playwriting

The Sonnet
Teachers: Lance Ozier

This class is a repeat of L-589. The sonnet is one of the oldest and most durable forms of poetry. It’s been used by great poets from Shakespeare to e. e. cummings. Because it has certain rules, it poses creative challenges for any poet, but as a result can yield poems that astonish and delight. Come see how poets have met the challenges and reaped the rewards over the past 400 years.

Philosophy Discussion
Teachers: Katya Radul

Come sit around and talk about philosophy! We'll have a few starter questions to discuss. But the plan is to go where the discussion leads us.

This is more like personal philosophy not discussion of philosophers or philosophical theories, but it can go either way.

Introduction to Russian Culture

Ever want to sip tea from a samovar and listen to Dima Bilan? Then Russian culture is calling your name! In this class, we'll discuss historical as well as modern Russian culture. We'll read Russian skazkas (classic fables) in English (and Russian!), listen to music, and discuss visiting Russia. During the course of the class, you’ll have plenty of opportunities to pick up on useful conversational Russian. All are welcome! No prior exposure anticipated!

A Brief Conversation About the Baha'i Faith
Teachers: David Nawi

Can you imagine covering an entire religion in one hour? Neither can I. So let's sit down, get relaxed, and have an hour discussion about a religion you may not have heard of or know much about. This will not be a lecture, so you must be sure to bring your questioning nature and open mind along for the ride.

Unknown Science Fiction and Fantasy
Teachers: Josh Shaine

There's nobody to discuss this book with, because you are the only person who has ever read it, that you know of! If you join us, you will be able to spread the word of unsung masterpieces, little known authors, and rare favorites, while picking up some new ideas for yourself! Be prepared to talk about what you recommend from beyond the mainstream, and why you recommend it. Please email me titles you know you are interested in discussing. That will help me to figure out what we will and will not be discussing and to prepare a list for the class.

Introduction to Esperanto

Learn the basics of the international planned language Esperanto quickly and easily! You will know how to write, read and have a simple conversation by the end of this course. Esperanto will help you make new friends everywhere in the world, and broaden your horizons!

How to Write a News Article
Teachers: Natasha Plotkin

Ever wondered how the journalists do it? In this class, learn how to collect and communicate a news story effectively, from researching to interviewing to writing. I'll teach you the basics, and then we'll look at examples of some journalistic successes and failures. Then, you'll give it a go yourself and practice writing solid openings and incorporating quotes in your article.

Uncovering the Ancient World
Teachers: Elisabeth Caron

Why should anyone care about what some dead guys did thousands of years ago? We'll explore how the ancient civilizations of Egypt, Greece and Rome continue to influence our daily life in 2007. This is a degree in Classics crammed into one hour, so be prepared for a crash course in the ancient world!

Philosophy Discussion
Teachers: Katya Radul

Come sit around and talk about philosophy! We'll have a few starter questions to discuss. But the plan is to go where the discussion leads us.

This is more like personal philosophy not discussion of philosophers or philosophical theories, but it can go either way.

Argumentation Theory and Debate! Part II

This is the second part of my other class (L679) on debate and argumentation. Come exercise the skills you have learned!


Prerequisites
L679 (Argumentation Theory and Debate, Part I)


Mathematics

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Trigonometry With Pictures
Teachers: Andrew Geng

Not satisfied with the confusing algebraic proofs of trigonometric identities in your textbook? Come see some terrific geometric proofs of your favorite formulas from trig!

Prior knowledge of trigonometry is *not* required, but it'll give you some perspective.


Prerequisites
high school geometry

Turning a Pea into the Sun: The Banach-Tarski Paradox
Teachers: Chris Kennedy

Sometimes you can get something for nothing. At least, you can when you manipulate a sphere in strange--but volume-preserving!--ways to make two spheres that are exactly the same as the one you started with. This is the essence of the Banach-Tarski Paradox--a mathematically tricky but really cool way to rearrange a sphere into two. We'll cover a proof of that, as well as most of the background material needed.


Prerequisites
Comfort with Algebra II and abstract ideas

Complex Numbers through Geometry

You know in school, when they said complex numbers were these wonderful algebraic structures, that involved taking square roots of negative numbers? Did this seem like an arbitrary unjustified step to you? We'll show you a geometric justification for why we construct complex numbers, and show that their algebraic structure follows from this geometric definition.


Prerequisites
Algebra, Geometry, and some knowledge of Complex Numbers

SET: The Math behind the Game
Teachers: Alexa Kottmeyer

For players of all skill levels who are curious about the math of SET.

We will be finding magic squares, "no sets", and some interesting alternative rule sets.

Some algebra background is helpful.

A Brief History of Calculus
Teachers: Nicole Berdy

Class will cover the beginnings of calculus with an emphasis on who exactly invented it. This class will focus primarily on the history side of calculus while covering any relevant mathematical topics at a level suitable for a general audience.

A (very) Brief Introduction to Calculus
Teachers: Nicole Berdy

Ever wonder what the big deal was about calculus? Wonder no more! This class will cover the very basics of differential calculus. Students will leave the class with a better understanding of what calculus is.


Prerequisites
proficiency in algebra, curiosity

The Necklaces : an technovative program in creativity
Teachers: Pablo Baques

Come and Discover intriguing sequences of numbers like 112358437... and extract melodies from them. Program an EXCEL spreadsheet to make huge Necklaces. Learn how to teach Necklacing to others and become a Necklacepreneur.

The Riemann Hypothesis
Teachers: Chris Kennedy

It's the most important unsolved problem in math, but very few people understand it. The Riemann hypothesis states that the zeta function only has certain roots. So what? Why are the roots of some random function so important? This class will have some answers, as well as some fun anecdotes at some partial proofs through the years. You don't need to be a math genius to understand this, but you should definitely be very solid on algebra and complex numbers.


Prerequisites
Complex numbers and functions.

Melissa the Mathemagician!
Teachers: Melissa Kaufman

Amaze your friends and family with these magic tricks! You will learn to read minds... using the power of math!

Feel free to bring in any math magic tricks you already know and share them with the group.

Polynomial Roots and Coefficients (Contest Math Series)
Teachers: Keone Hon, Ann Ouyang

In this seminar we will look at a series of powerful techniques and tools used to solve polynomial problems that occur frequently in math contests. Topics covered include Viete's formulas, Newton's sums, symmetric polynomials, and secondary polynomials.

This class is intended for students who want to improve their skills in preparation for math contests. Students should have some experience with such contests; we will be discussing mostly AIME- and HMMT-level problems.

SUDOKU - a competition
Teachers: Robert Assaly

Come try to solve these challenging, mind-enriching puzzles.

I shall present several SUDOKUs that are in the more difficult category. The objective is to solve them by specific procedures rather than by trial and error. Speed is not the goal.

Please bring a black pen and a red pen. (If you use specific methods correctly, then you would not need a pencil and eraser.) Electronic aids are not allowed.

At various times during the class, I shall show you methods for solving these puzzles.


Prerequisites
A love of solving math puzzles.

Markov and baseball, assessing offense using linear weights
Teachers: Chuck Korb

This class will discuss the evolution of offensive statistics in baseball, culminating with hands on instruction in the linear weights system (LWTS) created by Pete Palmer, arguably the most accurate offensive metric available today. If time remains, we will also examine the use of Markovian theory in the Win Probability Added (WPA) system.

Please bring a calculator, and wear your favorite team's hat.



Prerequisites
Must love baseball

The Elegance of Mathematics, Part 1

This class will study a series of relationships between numbers. A heavy part of the lesson will focus on polynomials, Pythagorean triples and Fibonacci Series. The class will be intensively examining number theory, although no prior experience is required. This class does not center around theorems and proofs, but rather about very interesting cases and traceable patterns.


Prerequisites
A solid foundation in algebra

Introduction to Multivariable Calculus
Teachers: Laura Schuhrke

Can't get enough of calculus? Push yourself a little farther with this introduction to multivariable! Topics will include partial derivatives, gradients, and Lagrange multipliers.


Prerequisites
some single variable calculus

Trigonometry With Pictures
Teachers: Andrew Geng

Not satisfied with the confusing algebraic proofs of trigonometric identities in your textbook? Come see some terrific geometric proofs of your favorite formulas from trig!

Prior knowledge of trigonometry is *not* required, but it'll give you some perspective.


Prerequisites
high school geometry

To Infinity and Beyond!
Teachers: Melissa Kaufman

What exactly is infinity? If yes, how big is it? Can there be more than one "infinity?" We will tackle this and other such questions in this class.

Solve One of These Math Problems and Become Famous
Teachers: Michael Kling

Learn about easy-looking problems in number theory that are simple to state, but remain unsolved today, including the 196-algorithm, the Collatz conjecture, the perfect cuboid problem, and others. Prove one and get your name in the history books!


Prerequisites
Algebra, Geometry

Least-Squares Data Fitting
Teachers: Katherine Schadel

We can fit models to data using regression analysis. This lecture will explore the most fundamental fitting technique developed, the method of least squares, and introduce students to key concepts in linear algebra and numerical methods, including matrices, orthogonal subspaces, and stability. The lecture will feature demonstrations of polynomial fitting in MATLAB.

Zenoian Motion...or lack thereof...
Teachers: Tina Tallon

There once was this guy named Zeno, who was born around 490 BC in Italy. "So he has a cool name," you say, "but why was he so important?" Well, truth be told, he wasn't really that important, which is why you've probably never heard of him. However, he did pretty much invent the method of proof known as reducto ad absurdum, or proof by contradiction, which you will come to love as a math major. A few interesting products of this logic are known as Zeno's Paradoxes, in which our friend Zeno proceeds to prove that motion does not actually exist, and that all motion is at best an illusion. In this course, we'll look at three of his particular paradoxes, and then examine the implications thereof, attempting to disprove (or prove?) them using calculus.


Prerequisites
Basic knowledge of calculus (limits, differentiation and integration)

Calculus a la Euler I: The Basics via Algebra and Geometry
Teachers: Michael Livshits

Leonard Euler, one of the most brilliant and prolific mathematicians ever, was born on April 15 1707. He lived and worked long before the notions of limits and continuity were introduced. How could he do Calculus? I will explain, starting with some simple examples. I will also show how Euler's ideas can be made rigorous and lead to a more direct approach to the subject.
This class is for people who are fluent in high school algebra and geometry and are curious about Calculus; some precalculus is a plus, familiarity with physics will help with motivation and appreciation. People who know some Calculus may also find my unorthodox approach entertaining.
Most of the content of this class is summarized in the first 10 slides for the talks that I gave at MathFest in 2004 and at the joint AMS-MAA meeting in 2006 (both fell on Friday the 13th), available at
(http://www.mathfoolery.org/talk-2004.pdf) See also a recent article in BAMS at
(http://www.ams.org/bull/2007-44-04/S0273-0979-07-01174-3/home.html)


Calculus a la Euler II: Some Theory via Inequalities
Teachers: Michael Livshits

Continuation of Calculus a la Euler I. I will present a streamlined theory of Calculus based on some simple inequalities and prove the fundamental theorem. I will show a few more sophisticated Calculus tricks
and/or discuss the relation of our approach to limits and continuity if there is enough time and interest.
The core content of this class is summarized in the last 3 slides for the talks that I gave at MathFest in 2004 and at the joint AMS-MAA meeting in 2006 (both fell on Friday the 13th),
available at http://www.mathfoolery.org/talk-2004.pdf



Prerequisites
Calculus a la Euler I

Some Party Tricks, Geometry and Topology
Teachers: Michael Livshits

Attach some loose strings to a chair and the other ends of these strings to some other furniture. Tumble the chair once. Can you untangle the strings without futher rotating the chair or moving the other furniture around? The answer is "no," and I will explain why during this class. Now tumble the chair once more in the same direction. The strings become even more messed up, but amazingly, you can untagle them now. Visit (http://gregegan.customer.netspace.net.au/APPLETS/21/21.html) to get some idea how. Now grab a coffee cup by its bottom. Can you give the cup 2 full revolutions without spilling the coffee or twisting your arm and/or hand out of their joints? Hint: pass the cup under your forearm during the first revolution and keep it over your forearm during the second one. See page 804 In section 23 of the free physics book at http://www.motionmountain.com for an illustration.
Don't attempt this trick with hot coffee in the cup before you become good at it. In this class, besides practicing these and some other party tricks, you will learn several ways to mathematically describe rotations in 3 dimensions. One particularly elegant description uses quaternions and will be especially handy in seeing the connection with quantum mechanics of electrons and understanding why the table of chemical elements is periodic.


Prerequisites
Familiarity with algebra, geometry in 3 dimensions, vectors, matrices, trigonometry and complex numbers.

Calculus a la Euler I: The Basics via Algebra and Geometry
Teachers: Michael Livshits

Leonard Euler, one of the most brilliant and prolific mathematicians ever, was born on April 15 1707. He lived and worked long before the notions of limits and continuity were introduced. How could he do Calculus? I will explain, starting with some simple examples. I will also show how Euler's ideas can be made rigorous and lead to a more direct approach to the subject.
This class is for people who are fluent in high school algebra and geometry and are curious about Calculus; some precalculus is a plus, familiarity with physics will help with motivation and appreciation. People who know some Calculus may also find my unorthodox approach entertaining.
Most of the content of this class is summarized in the first 10 slides for the talks that I gave at MathFest in 2004 and at the joint AMS-MAA meeting in 2006 (both fell on Friday the 13th), available at
(http://www.mathfoolery.org/talk-2004.pdf)
See also a recent article in BAMS at
(http://www.ams.org/bull/2007-44-04/S0273-0979-07-01174-3/home.html)


Calculus a la Euler II: Some Theory via Inequalities
Teachers: Michael Livshits

Continuation of Calculus a la Euler I. I will present a streamlined theory of Calculus based on some simple inequalities and prove the fundamental theorem. I will show a few more sophisticated Calculus tricks
and/or discuss the relation of our approach to limits and continuity if there is enough time and interest.
The core content of this class is summarized in the last 3 slides for the talks that I gave at MathFest in 2004 and at the joint AMS-MAA meeting in 2006 (both fell on Friday the 13th), available at (http://www.mathfoolery.org/talk-2004.pdf)


Prerequisites
Calculus a la Euler I

Some Party Tricks, Geometry and Topology
Teachers: Michael Livshits

Attach some loose strings to a chair and the other ends of these strings to some other furniture. Tumble the chair once. Can you untangle the strings without futher rotating the chair or moving the other furniture around? The answer is "no," and I will explain why during this class. Now tumble the chair once more in the same direction. The strings become even more messed up, but amazingly, you can untagle them now. Visit (http://gregegan.customer.netspace.net.au/APPLETS/21/21.html) to get some idea how. Now grab a coffee cup by its bottom. Can you give the cup 2 full revolutions without spilling the coffee or twisting your arm and/or hand out of their joints? Hint: pass the cup under your forearm during the first revolution and keep it over your forearm during the second one. See page 804 In section 23 of the free physics book at http://www.motionmountain.com for an illustration.
Don't attempt this trick with hot coffee in the cup before you become good at it. In this class, besides practicing these and some other party tricks, you will learn several ways to mathematically describe rotations in 3 dimensions. One particularly elegant description uses quaternions and will be especially handy in seeing the connection with quantum mechanics of electrons and understanding why the table of chemical elements is periodic.


Prerequisites
Familiarity with algebra, geometry in 3 dimensions, vectors, matrices, trigonometry and complex numbers.

Sequences and Series (Contest Math Series)

In this seminar we will look at techniques and tools used to study sequences and evaluate series in ways that occur frequently in math contests. Topics covered include arithmetic and geometric series, telescoping series, and recursion.

This class is intended for students who want to improve their skills in preparation for math contests. Students should have some experience with such contests; we will be discussing mostly AIME- and HMMT-level problems.

Topological Graph Theory
Teachers: Marisa Debowsky

Draw five dots on a page. Can you connect them without crossing any lines? We'll (rigorously) solve this puzzle --and answer lots of other questions about dots and lines-- in this 1-hour investigation into Topological Graph Theory. And the answers will not be limited to the plane: can you connect the same five dots if they're sprinkled on a donut instead of drawn on a piece of paper? You'll come away with a new understanding of the old joke about a mathematician being "someone who can't tell the difference between a donut and a coffee cup."

Math is Beautiful!
Teachers: Catherine Kruchten

Math can be found in some pretty unexpected places...we'll discuss the use of classical mathematical concepts in works of art and architecture, and some more modern ideas that can be found in the world around us.

Math is Beautiful!
Teachers: Catherine Kruchten

Math can be found in some pretty unexpected places...we'll discuss the use of classical mathematical concepts in works of art and architecture, and some more modern ideas that can be found in the world around us.

The Amazing Things That Happen in 2 Dimensions
Teachers: Daniel Zaharopol

Imagine you were a two-dimensional creature, and you lived on the surface of the sphere. Look out from the north pole, and what do you see? The back of your head, because light rays wrap all the way from the north pole, around the south pole and back to the north.

Imagine you lived on the surface of a donut. Look out from where you are and what do you see? Infinitely many copies of you, arranged in a repeating pattern out in front of you, all doing exactly what you do at every moment. (Think about that. Consider all the directions you could look out at. But if you don't see it, don't worry --- we'll talk about it.)

"Two dimensions" doesn't mean the plane. It means all spaces that *look* two dimensional, like spheres and "donuts" (what mathematicians call "tori"). It also means strange, less familiar spaces, like the Klein bottle --- which is two-dimensional everywhere, but you can't fit a copy of it in our three-dimensional world; you need four-dimensions to comfortably fit it at all.

We're going to explore the many (infinitely many!) kinds of "surfaces," two-dimensional objects like these. By the end, we'll understand what all of them look like, even the ones that don't fit in three dimensions at all. At the end, I'll talk a little bit about what happens in higher dimensions, studying a kind of object called a "manifold."

This class will require a lot of thinking, so please come prepared for some very challenging abstract thought. Recommended only for high-school age and above.

The Reeb Foliation of the 3-Sphere
Teachers: Daniel Zaharopol

Welcome to the fourth dimension. What lives here?

A circle and a sphere (the outside shell of a ball) seem to be pretty similar objects. Take a slice through a sphere, and you get a circle. The equation of a circle (in two-dimensional space) is $$x^2 + y^2 = 1$$; the equation of a sphere (in three-dimensional space) is $$x^2 + y^2 + z^2 = 1$$.

Mathematicians call a circle the "1-sphere," because up close it looks like a line; they call the sphere the "2-sphere," because up close it looks like a plane. So what happens if you go up a dimension? You should get an object that sits inside *four* dimensions, and it should have the equation $$x^2 + y^2 + z^2 + w^2 = 1$$.

We're going to study this mysterious "3-sphere." We'll understand some of its properties, how to visualize what it looks like and what it would be like to be inside. After all, just like the circle looked like a line up close, and the (2-)sphere looked like a plane up close, this new object should look like 3-dimensional space up close... in other words, *we* could be inside it!

The System that Ate Itself: Gödel's Incompleteness Theorem
Teachers: Jesse Dunietz

Gödel's Incompleteness Theorem, one of the most philosophically profound ideas of mathematical logic, radically altered the way we understand mathematical truth. In this class, we will build up a conceptual explanation of Gödel's proof, covering the basics of formal systems, predicate calculus, and self-reference along the way. Largely based on the presentation in Gödel, Escher, Bach.

The Horrible Inefficiency of English
Teachers: Katya Radul

Say you're a weatherman on Mars, and you need to send messages back to earth reporting whether it was stormy or nice on certain days. You could send a "1" for a storm and a "0" for no storm, but can you do it more efficiently? The answer...maybe. In class you'll see why.

Or maybe you need to send a message that consists of an English word or phrase. Can you use fewer symbols than the phrase contains? (if u txt msg u no u can!) How low can you go? The answer depends on probabilities of English letters, and that can get complicated, but we'll find a neat way around that.

There's a lot of math behind these examples, but we'll focus more on the conceptual ideas.




Prerequisites
Familiarity with logarithms might be helpful.

Paradoxes and Unsolvable Problems
Teachers: Naomi Hinchen

That's right: these problems have no answer. Or more than one answer. Or an answer that contradicts itself. Come bend your brain around famous paradoxes from game theory and other fields.


Prerequisites
Basic algebra. Background in game theory is helpful but not necessary.

Playing with Matrices
Teachers: Avril Kenney

You will learn what matrices are and try out some of their surprisingly diverse mathematical applications. Did you know that you can use matrices to solve a system of linear equations? Come to this class to find out how.
(This course is aimed at students with little or no experience with matrices.)

Euclidean Geometry Problem Solving (Contest Math Series)
Teachers: Michael McCanna, A Z

So high school geometry was a breeze? Now is your chance to apply your knowledge creatively. We will first review and prove some classical results, including triangle centers, areas, circle theorems, and Ptolemy's theorem. Then, we will work in small groups on problems, and each group will present solutions and learn from each other.

This class is intended for students who want to improve their skills in preparation for math contests. Students should have some experience with such contests; we will be discussing mostly AIME- and HMMT-level problems.


Prerequisites
High School Geometry

What is a number? (And what about sets and sizes and infinity?)
Teachers: Jonathan Sailor

You may think "number" is a simple concept. In reality, mathematicians deal with many different kinds of numbers. We'll start by exploring different types of numbers (from reals to ordinals), what kind of structures those numbers form, and how numbers can be grounded in set theory. Then: how to tell how big something is, how many infinities there are (a lot), and some really cool theorems that might just make your head spin.

(While we'll touch a bit on abstract algebra, measure theory, etc., the class will be mostly based on set theory.)


Prerequisites
Some experience with proofs and formal math

Combinatorics Problem Solving (Contest Math Series)
Teachers: Michael McCanna, A Z

Sure, you can count, but how efficiently can you? Learn how to model counting and probabilistic situations with powerful tools, including Pascal's Triangle, PIE, bijections, etc. We will work in small groups on problems and present solutions to learn from each other.

This class is intended for students who want to improve their skills in preparation for math contests. Students should have some experience with such contests; we will be discussing mostly AIME- and HMMT-level problems.


Prerequisites
strong high school algebra background recommended

Know Your Bases
Teachers: Ada Ren

Tired of base 10, our current number system? People use it all the time and it gets kind of boring. Amaze and confuse everyone by learning about different bases such as binary and hexadecimal! Plus, create your own number system and make others do calculations in it.

Dynamical Systems
Teachers: Stanislav Nikolov

Simple systems can evolve in interesting and complex ways over time.

We will study some simple and interesting situations like:

How does a virus spread among a population? How does a romantic relationship develop based on first impressions? and more.

Learn how to think about such questions and study their behavior mathematically.

The focus will mainly be on systems with one or two unknowns, but you will get a flavor of what happens in larger systems.

Mathematical topics will probably include
-cobweb diagrams
-eigenvalues and eigenvectors
-Markov processes


Prerequisites
helpful but certainly not required/expected - exposure to and/or some knowledge of differential eqs (i.e., what is a diff eq) and linear algebra (systems of equations, determinants, etc)

Number Theory
Teachers: David Roe

Number theory is the branch of mathematics that studies properties of the integers. Despite being around for thousands of years, there are still many fundamental unsolved problems. In this class we will cover some of the basic techniques of number theory, including modular arithmetic, Fermat's Little Theorem, primes and unique factorization. These can help you understand where divisibility rules come from, how primality tests work and how to solve systems of modular equations. There are no prerequisites for this course, but a comfort with abstract mathematics will help you get more out of this class.

The Limit of Formal Systems: Hilbert, Gödel, Turing, Church
Teachers: Jonathan Sailor

Come for an in-depth discussion on the limits of any sort of formal system, from math to computers. We'll cover Gödel's Theorems (and why they make mathematicians hope math is **in**complete!) We'll also cover the halting problem, the Entscheidungsproblem, and other related topics, in the vein of /Gödel, Escher, Bach/.

Note: this class is similar to Jesse Dunietz's M840 ("The System that Ate itself: Gödel's Incompleteness Theorem"). His class will be a more mathematically-oriented proof of the theorem; mine will focus more on applications and a computer-science-influenced perspective. We suggest students don't take both classes (but that's up to you.)


Prerequisites
Experience with programming, computer science, or math

Algebraic Structures
Teachers: David Roe

The algebra you learned in middle school is only the beginning of the story. You've learned how to manipulate symbols and solve polynomial equations. But that is only a tiny fraction of what mathematicians call algebra. Algebra is actually the study of sets with different kinds of operations: groups, rings, fields, modules, vector spaces... By learning about them abstractly, we can prove powerful theorems that apply to ALL groups, or ALL rings. We can use our knowledge of these objects to answer questions that arise naively, like "is it possible to come up with a formula to solve a general degree 5 polynomial equation in one variable?" In this class I will introduce you to these algebraic objects. There are no prerequisites beyond high school algebra, but the material will very difficult.

Finite Fields
Teachers: David Roe

Is it possible to have a system of numbers like the real numbers or rational numbers, where we can add, subtract, multiply and divide, but with only finitely many elements? The answer is yes: for each prime power, there is a unique field with that many elements. We will prove this result, construct these fields, and learn a few applications. THIS COURSE WILL BE DIFFICULT AND ABSTRACT.


Prerequisites
M909 (Number Theory) or knowledge of modular arithemetic; M920 (Algebraic Structures); M972 (Galois Groups) will be relevant for a few parts

Representations of Finite Groups
Teachers: David Roe

A group is a set with one operation that is associative, has an identity and in which every element has an inverse. We learned about some abstract groups in Algebraic Structures (symmetries of a cube, permutations of the numbers {1,2,..., n}, matrices with complex entries and determinant 1,...). In this class we will learn more about finite groups using a powerful tool called representation theory. The knowledge that we gain by doing so is used ubiquitously in mathematics. It is used by chemists to understand molecular orbitals. Representations of Lie groups show up in particle physics. Come see the subject in it's cleanest, most basic form. THIS CLASS WILL BE ABSTRACT AND DIFFICULT.


Prerequisites
M920 (Algebraic Structures), a joy in difficult mathematics

Real and p-adic numbers
Teachers: David Roe

A real number is a number like $$ ==2.73, -47, \pi, e^{7.91}\cdots== $$ But what is a real number, actually? How does one define it rigorously? We'll see two constructions of the reals: Dedekind cuts and Cauchy sequences. Then we'll apply Cauchy sequences to construct a new type of number system: the p-adic numbers. They are similar to the reals in many ways, but don't have the property that for any nonzero x, we can find a positive integer n such that $$ ==|nx| > 1== $$ . This course has no formal prerequisites, though it will be abstract at points.


Prerequisites
Comfort working with real numbers and abstract mathematics.

Elliptic Curves and Modular Forms
Teachers: David Roe

There are many possible definitions of an elliptic curve. Perhaps the easiest to understand is the following. An elliptic curve is the set of points $$(x, y)$$ satisfying an equation of the form $$y^2 = x^3 + ax + b$$. It turns out that the points of an elliptic curve form a group (the same kind of object we learned about in Algebraic Structures and Representations of Finite Groups). This group of points is used in a huge number of applications, from cryptography to factoring integers. A modular form is kind of like a function that assigns a number to each elliptic curve. Modular forms are related to the fact that $$e^{\pi \sqrt{163}}$$ is so close to an integer (use a computer to check it out). This class will consist of a whirlwind overview of interesting results related to elliptic curves and modular forms. IT WILL BE DIFFICULT AND ABSTRACT.


Prerequisites
M909 (Number Theory) or knowledge of modular arithmetic, M920 (Algebraic Structures), M922 (Finite Fields) will be useful for a few parts

Galois Representations
Teachers: David Roe

This is my annual crazy course, where there's very little chance of anyone understanding much of what I talk about. The hope is that you will be able to see through the difficult mathematics and pick out beautiful pieces that inspire you to learn more.

Galois representations and the Langland's correspondence are a subject of intense current research in number theory. This class will draw on material from all of my previous classes. You are welcome to come without the prereqs. Even if you have them, you will almost certainly be lost. It'll be fun!


Prerequisites
M909 (Number Theory), M920 (Algebraic Structures), M922 (Finite Fields), M926 (Representations of Finite Groups), M927 (Real and p-adic numbers), M930 (Elliptic Curves and Modular Forms), M971 (More fun with p-adics), M972 (Galois Groups)

Number Tricks
Teachers: Beth Schaffer

...divisibility rules, mental multiplication, the postage trick, factorials, sums of series...

Triangles, Angles, and Ratios
Teachers: Beth Schaffer

Learn tricks to find the side lengths and angles of triangles in all sorts of situations!

Mathematical Story Time!
Teachers: Kendra Beckler

Learn some math while listening to stories about the infinity worms of Callisto (trying to live forever via math), surfing the Mandelbrot set, saving the red-eyed dragons from the evil sorcerer using logic, getting out of jail with probability, and more.


Prerequisites
Pre-algebra

Math problem solving

We will cover mathematical ideas and techniques, and show how they can be applied to problems. Problems used as examples will vary, going up to the olympiad level.

Most of the focus will be on number theory and geometry, but combinatorics and other topics will be included as well.


Prerequisites
Some knowledge of algebra and geometry, as well as an enthusiasm for learning

More fun with p-adics
Teachers: David Roe

In this second hour we will continue exploring p-adics by considering their extensions. p-adic extensions are much more rich and interesting than extensions of the real numbers. We will also discuss some p-adic geometry. This class will be more difficult and have more prerequisites than the first course, but you're welcome to come even if you think you'll be totally lost. THIS COURSE WILL BE DIFFICULT AND ABSTRACT.


Prerequisites
M290 (Algebraic Structures); M922 (Finite Fields); M927 (Real and p-adic numbers 1); M972 (Galois Groups)

Galois Groups
Teachers: David Roe

We will continue our exploration of algebra after dinner, proceeding to more advanced topics like field theory and Galois groups. If you didn't come to the two hours before dinner you will be totally lost. Even if you did, this class will be difficult.


Prerequisites
M920 (Algebraic Structures)

Hypercubes!
Teachers: Melissa Kaufman

What is the fourth dimension and what does it look like? We will build a model to explore a part of this concept.

Playing with Matrices
Teachers: Avril Kenney

You will learn what matrices are and try out some of their surprisingly diverse mathematical applications. Did you know that you can use matrices to solve a system of linear equations? Come to this class to find out how.
(This course is aimed at students with little or no experience with matrices.)

Complex Numbers, Quaternions, Rotations and Spins
Teachers: Michael Livshits

Many of you probably know that complex numbers are related to geometry in 2 dimensions. In this class we will try to understand how quaternions are handy in 3-dimensional geometry, in particular, how they can be used to deal with rotations in 3 dimensions. This connection turns out to be very useful in describing the spin of electrons and understanding why they are fermions -- the fact that makes the table of elements periodic.
This class is a short version of Some Party Tricks, Geometry and Topology, we will concentrate more on mathematics and will go easy on tricks, I may still show some for entertainment if time permits.



Prerequisites
Familiarity with algebra, geometry in 3 dimensions, vectors, matrices, trigonometry and complex numbers.


Performing Arts

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Try your hand at sleight-of-hand
Teachers: Hannah Bao

Always wanted to amuse others with quick magic tricks? Looks like you've found the right class!

Here you'll learn some magic tricks involving cards, coins and of course, sleight-of-hand. (This means the tricks will not involve math, sorry!).

Many of these will be "classics" and are not recommended for those with a few tricks already up their sleeve.

Standard decks of cards will be provided, feel free to bring your own though!

Basic Jazz Improvisation
Teachers: Joseph Axiak

Basic through intermediate techniques for Jazz improvisation, including scales and chords over blues, Impressions, and possibly other basic progressions. This course will be very custom-tailored to the skill levels of the students in the class. Experience on your instrument is required, but no jazz experience is necessary. Bring your instruments!


Prerequisites
Experience on your instrument

Intermediate Jazz improvisation
Teachers: Joseph Axiak

Intermediate Jazz improvisation techniques. Scales and chords with tensions over blues, Impressions, Autumn Leaves, and other standard progressions. This course will be custom-tailored to the skill levels of the musicians who enroll. Experience on your instrument and experience with jazz improvisation is required. Bring your instruments!


Prerequisites
Experience on your instrument and with Jazz

How to Chant the Torah
Teachers: Stephen Fried

When the Hebrew Bible is read out loud, a standardized set of tunes and cantillations are used in order to turn the text into a poetic song. If you need some more practice with your Torah chant for your Bar/Bat Mitzvah, or if you want to develop this skill just for the fun of it or to impress your friends, then here's your chance to improve your skills or start from scratch!


Prerequisites
Ability to read Hebrew

Hoop Dance with Yoga
Teachers: Simone Klein

Hoop dance is the hottest exercise craze to hit the nation. It is not only good for your body--but you look amazing doing it. You might have gotten to see "Hoopalicious" on "America's Got Talent." Now it is your chance to learn from one of Hoopalicious' own students.

The class will start with a yoga warm up featuring the "Five Tibitian Exercises" (which will be taught) and a light stretch to some ambient music. Then, the students will pick up their hoops (which will be made by the instructor and donated to each student), and learn the basic mechanics of hooping. How does one keep up the hoop? What does one do when the hoop starts falling? Why does the hoop keep on tilting? I will give each student personal attention to address their personal problems and strengths. Depending on the progress of the class, we will then work on walking with the hoop, turning with the hoop, hooping on one's hand, and transferring between the two. Other tricks will be taught that will amaze and astonish viewers. An emphasis will be placed not only on technical aspects, but allowing oneself to feel the music and DANCE. The class will end with a jam session, allowing the participants to have fun and play around with their new found hooping skills.

This will be a two day class. The format of the two days will be very similar, but the second day will have more advanced techniques and tricks. It will include hooping on the hips and chest, in addition to adding deliberate hand motions. By the end of the class, a student should have a good foundation in the basics of hoop dance which will enable one to learn more complex moves. Furthermore, the student should have started to separate one's hoop from one's general body movement to enable free dance and expression.


Prerequisites
Open mindedness and a desire for fun...

Learn to Para Para!
Teachers: Emily Pittore

Para Para is a dance form that originated in Japanese clubs. It consists of choreographed sequences of arm movements to peppy eurobeat/techno music. It's easy to learn and a lot of fun to do! There's even an arcade game version. No experience or dance ability necessary!
Want to see what Para Para really is? Here's a couple youtube videos to get you started.
http://tinyurl.com/2t4pf6
http://tinyurl.com/2tkoy5

Glowstick Dancing for Novices
Teachers: Colin McSwiggen

When you wave glowsticks around in the dark, it looks pretty cool. That's the main idea in this class. I'll teach you some of the basic moves of glowsticking, plus some tips on practicing and developing your own style. I'm still a beginner myself, so don't expect wonders, but odds are you'll learn enough to impress people at your next dance party.

Glowsticks are provided.

Bhangra and Bollywood Dance

Do you want to learn two new dance styles, get an aerobic workout, and have fun all at the same time? Come learn some moves from Bhangra and Bollywood dance that will impress everyone on the dance floor. Bhangra is an energetic dance from the Indian state of Punjab and Bollywood dance is, well, the main dance of Indian pop culture. Fuse these two dances together and get a healthy dose of fun Indian culture!

The Crash Course Course Acts Naturally
Teachers: Jordan Persson

An offshoot of the Crash Course Course, this class is focused (no lie!) on acting and improv. We'll play some improv games and maybe go make a scene. If you want to spend a couple of hours shouting and doing silly things, this is probably the class for you.

Diabolo

Diabolo, or Chinese yo-yo, is a circus art that is practiced the world over for performance and enjoyment. This class is intended for skill levels ranging from absolute beginners to those with an intermediate working knowledge of tricks.

Contemporary A Cappella Arranging
Teachers: Marisa Debowsky

Do you sing with a high school a cappella group? Or are you interested in college a cappella? Then you want to be able to write your own arrangements. In this seminar, we'll take a pop song and turn it into an arrangement for a fictional 12-voice contemporary a cappella group. For novices, we'll cover the basics of how to create a great arrangement; for those who've already started arranging, we'll talk about tips and tricks of the trade, creative syllables, resources, and more.


Prerequisites
Reading music --at least a little-- would be most helpful.

From The Sound of Music to Sondheim

Do you ever find yourself Singin' in the Rain? Or Defying Gravity? In this class we'll discuss different themes and styles present in musicals through clips and cast recordings.

Intro to Middle Eastern Belly Dance
Teachers: Meiver De la Cruz

This class will provide an overview of basic moves that are part of the core vocabulary of this art form. Breaking the misconception created by the misnomer "belly" dance - we will learn a short dance using the whole body. We will emphasize the role of the arms and hands, posture, hip and torso isolations, and basic traveling steps.

Radio! Discovering sound as a medium of communication.

Have you ever wondered how radio programs are created? This course will introduce you to some of the actual equipment, interviewing and recording techniques, and computer-based editing programs that are used to create radio programs. By the end of the class, students will have created a short piece of their own!

Improv Workshop
Teachers: Catherine Havasi

You're the host of a party where everyone is spontaneously turning into chickens. You're a film director with a time machine. You're a row of dominoes contemplating their purpose in life. Act accordingly. In improv acting, you and a few other people are given an odd, open-ended situation, and together you act out a scene on the spot. If you've seen "Whose Line Is It Anyway?", you know the general idea. Improv is easier than you think! You don't need any acting or improv experience. We'll start with some games that get you thinking on your toes and building on each other's creativity. You'd be surprised what kind of scenes you can create.

Actors' Workshop

Do you love acting, or want to get into it? Want to learn the basics and explore a few interesting parts? Or do you want to see how to make your roles more specific, how to add power and truth to the lines you utter? While we may not be able to answer every acting question, what we can do is create a supportive environment where we can all work on scenes and develop our skills with guidance from some experienced directors.

We'll talk about acting, the process that goes into it and how to improve. Together, we'll work on some scenes: we'll split up, each work on a role, and then present them to each other at the end. From this class, you'll see some new perspectives on what goes into portraying a role convincingly, and you'll also get to work on your acting skills in a focused but low-stress environment. If you're new to acting, or if you've had years of experience, you are welcome here!

Introduction to Traditional Chinese Dance
Teachers: Adrianna Tam

An overview of traditional Chinese dance for beginners, from instruction in footwork to learning how to smile for long periods of time.

The Legacy of Beethoven
Teachers: Kendra Beckler

Beethoven's music caused classical music to vault into the Romantic Era, freeing composers from the strict constraints of the Classical Era. Learn about the personalities and listen to the music behind the rapid evolution of classical music during the Romantic Era. From the literary influence of Goethe to the popularity of Wagner, we will explore what exactly makes the Romantic Era so special.

Diabolo
Teachers: Joshua Velson

Diabolo, or Chinese yo-yo, is a circus art that is practiced all over the world for performance and enjoyment. This class is intended for skill levels ranging from absolute beginner to those with an intermediate working knowledge of tricks.

Crash Course in Voice
Teachers: Lyla Fischer

Everything you ever wanted to know about singing, condensed into a couple hours. What are those silly warm ups and why do singers do them? How can you sing the exact same note and make it sound different? We will be covering a lot of material, so be prepared. The topics include ombeture, breathing, posture, solfege, and tone. Maybe some sight reading, if time allows.


Prerequisites
Some familiarity with music

Try your hand at sleight-of-hand
Teachers: Hannah Bao

Always wanted to amuse others with quick magic tricks? Looks like you've found the right class!

Here you'll learn some magic tricks involving cards, coins and of course, sleight-of-hand. (This means the tricks will not involve math, sorry!).

Many of these will be "classics" and are not recommended for those with a few tricks already up their sleeve.

Standard decks of cards will be provided, feel free to bring your own though!


Science

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A Bit of Physics

I like physics. This class will involve some neat demonstrations, some math to emphasize just how cool those demonstrations were, and some discussion on how you can go about learning more physics on your own.

Introduction to Genetics
Teachers: Steven Mo

Introduction to Mendel's laws, Punnett sqaure, one gene vs. two gene analysis, pedigree analysis, modes of inheritance, complementation test, conditional probability, and Bayes theorem. We will go over many fundamental concepts to make sure you really grasp the taste of analyzing many genetics problems in the real world!!!

Items to bring: paper, pen/pencil, a calculator


Prerequisites
You are interested in biology!

Going Nuclear: What is Nuclear Energy?

Ever wanted to learn what nuclear energy is? Nuclear energy can be used in applications ranging from nuclear weapons to medical treatments. Find out what the difference is between nuclear fission and fusion. Learn how dangerous radiation really is and how we can safely use it. Uncover the problems facing nuclear energy, and help figure out ways to solve them!

Why Should I Care about the Environment?
Teachers: Kathreen Thome

Are you an environmentalist who gets frustrated with telling friends what they should do and then do? Are you one of those doubting friends who doesn't understand why your friend gets so bent out of shape? Come find out why you should care and how to live sustainability without driving yourself crazy.

Origins of Modern Science from Copernicus to Newton
Teachers: Lance Ozier

500 years ago, most people thought the Earth was the center of the universe and that there were only four elements: earth, air, water, and fire. Come learn how five men, two supernovas, and the Black Plague changed all that.

High School Chemistry is Wrong
Teachers: Chris Kennedy

Ever been told hydrogen only makes one bond? That water has two lone pairs? That carbon can only make four bonds? Did someone ever make fun of you for drawing a quadruple bond?

This class will be a whirlwind tour through all the chemistry you weren't supposed to see yet--quadruple bonds, hydrogen bonding to two different atoms, and beautiful but totally out-there reactions. If you've ever been frustrated by the limitations of high school chemistry, take this class.


Prerequisites
Some familiarity with orbitals

One-Way Missions to Mars
Teachers: Phillip Cunio

This class will discuss some concepts for crewed Mars missions, and will detail some of the arguments for one-way trips and permanent colonizations rather than round-trip expeditions. Discussion of interest in one-way or round-trip missions will occur among class participants after an initial assessment of the risks to each mission is offered.

The Quantum States of Light
Teachers: Bhaskar Mookerji

The goal of this class will be to provide a taste of one of the most useful physical theories ever devised (quantum mechanics) and how it's used to look at physics' most-favorite phenomenological punching bag: light. Studying this subject will put you on the road to having a modern understanding of how light and matter behave at the atomic scale.

We introduce basic ideas in quantum electrodynamics as a way to understand light from very elementary physical principles. General quantum mechanics formalism: states, operators, Dirac notation, physical observables, and measurement. Electrodynamics: Classical and quantum harmonic oscillators. Gauge transformations and quantization of a classical electromagnetic field. Postulating the existence and energy of photons. Optics: Quantum mechanical models of macroscopic "splitting" of light. Single quantum-state manipulation and applications to practical quantum computing.


Prerequisites
Mathematical maturity, calculus, and a familiarity with classical electromagnetism and early results of modern physics.

Cosmology for the Common Nerd
Teachers: David Friend

I'll talk about all of the "cool" stuff in cosmology. Black holes, dark matter, dark energy, multiple universes, many dimensions, the fabric of space time, etc.

The common thread for the talk will be space travel and the various peculiarities that you'd discover as you ventured into space.

Possible topics include: why the electromagnetic force is so much stronger than gravity, virtual photons, Hawking radiation, wormholes, what it's like to fall into a black hole, moving at the speed of light, whether there are multiple universes (and how we could find out), expansion of the universe, cloaking devices, time travel, the temperature of outer space, and much more. I will try to avoid math at all costs, but $$E=mc^2$$ may make an inadvertent appearance.


Prerequisites
Innate curiosity about our universe

Why the sky is blue and answers to other pressing questions
Teachers: David Friend

Take this class if you want to understand why the sky is blue, why clouds are white, where rainbows come from, why the ocean is blue, why sunsets and sunrises are red, why snow is white, why glaciers are blue, why the grass is green, and many other things about colors on Earth.

Does pollution really make sunsets prettier? The answer is yes, but don't take my word for it. I'll make a sunset appear in class (and other demonstrations too).

This lecture uses no math and advanced students may find it elementary.


Prerequisites
Innate curiosity about our world

Music & the Brain
Teachers: Sheeva Azma

ever wonder what happens in your ears and brain when you hear a song? we'll be talking about music and neuroscience, from waveforms to emotions.


Prerequisites
none necessary, although a musical background and/or some basic knowledge of neuroscience and physics might be helpful.

Physics Olympiad Master Class
Teachers: Kenan Diab, Haofei Wei

Tips, tricks, and advice for the United States Physics Team screening exams: it is taught by Kenan Diab and Haofei Wei: both of them were two-time members of the U.S. Physics Team (2006 and 2007), they won a gold and a silver medal for the United States at the 2007 International Physics Olympiad, and they are currently students at MIT.


Prerequisites
Physics

Chemistry Magic!
Teachers: Stephen Fried

Want to use science to impress your friends? We'll use simple household chemicals to perform awesome tricks... and then learn the science behind the magic. Come prepared to learn and be amazed!

Photosynthesis is Amazing!
Teachers: Stephen Fried

In plants, light from the sun is used to turn carbon dioxide into energy-rich sugar molecules. It's an incredibly complicated process that uses nano-solar panels to capture photons to do chemical work. Scientists want to learn more about photosynthesis because it might give us an idea of how to use solar power for alternative energy. Learn more about what really goes on in a leaf and how research at MIT might change the way we generate energy in the future!


Prerequisites
Intro Chemistry, intro biology

Diseases of the Nervous System
Teachers: Yasemin Gokce, Nina Kim

We will cover various diseases such as Alzheimer's, Huntington's, ALS, Parkinson's, Depression, and Schizophrenia.

How the brain works: a hands-on introduction

Curious about how your brain works? Ever wanted to peek inside your head and see what's going on? In this class, you'll learn about different brain structures and some of their functions. After learning some basics, you'll participate with a partner in dissecting a sheep brain (similar to the human brain). Come and learn how these remarkable biological computers work!


Prerequisites
None but students should be comfortable with dissection exercise.

Renewable Energy Systems
Teachers: Kevin Brokish

An energetic introduction to renewable energy technologies! In a mere 60 minutes, we'll examine how the following work: fuel cells, CHPs, biomass, various solar technologies, and especially wind power. Then we'll tie it all together with the concept of energy storage and microgrids.


Prerequisites
Physics is recommended

Intro to Neuroscience
Teachers: Kaitlin Kamrowski

This introduction to neuroscience will give students an overview of the nervous system. It will cover the basics about the neuron (action potential, ion channels, etc), synapses and neurotransmitters, and neuroanatomy. We will also discuss a few neurological diseases and some drugs used to treat them. For students just interested in learning about the brain, and those who may want to pursue psychology or neuroscience in college.


Prerequisites
High school biology

Going Nuclear: What is Nuclear Energy?

Ever wanted to learn what nuclear energy is? Nuclear energy can be used in applications ranging from nuclear weapons to medical treatments. Find out what the difference is between nuclear fission and fusion. Learn how dangerous radiation really is and how we can safely use it. Uncover the problems facing nuclear energy, and help figure out ways to solve them!

Orbital Mechanics Zero
Teachers: Phillip Cunio

This class will discuss some of the basic concepts underlying orbital mechanics, leaving most of the more rigorous mathematics aside in order to focus on the geometry of orbits.

Make Your Own Ice Cream

What kind of ice cream do you like? Vanilla, strawberry chocolate chip, butterscotch bannana, some other crazy concoction? Learn how to make (and eat) your own ice cream using milk, sugar, ice, and salt. Please bring gloves.

Your Mind Sucks
Teachers: Colin McSwiggen

Your mind is a machine that gathers data and then analyzes it. That is, you perceive the present, remember the past, and try to predict the future, and then you think about it. You probably think your mind is pretty good at what it does. But you're wrong. And that's not the only thing you're wrong about - in fact, your mind has been feeding you all sorts of mistakes, omissions, fabrications and even outright lies about all kinds of things all the time, without your even realizing it! This mental trickery is incurable, but you can at least learn how you have been and will continue to be duped by your own brain - and why that's probably a good thing.

Science Discovers God
Teachers: Yale Zussman

By identifying certain themes that connect the various sciences, it is possible to derive a scientific requirement for an entity having all the essential properties of God. Along the way, we will discuss the role of pure chance in physics and chemistry, what distinguishes life from non-life, why animals are different from other living things, what distinguishes humans from other animals, and the role of civilization.

Some familiarity with current thinking about the origin of the universe, the origin of life, and the development of civilization, and an open mind. Although it will not be highly technical, this course is not for the intellectually faint of heart.



Prerequisites
Some familiarity with current thinking about the origin of the universe, the origin of life, the development of civilization, and an open mind.

The End of the World
Teachers: Kenneth Schumacher

Though it is a somewhat depressing topic, it is also one of the most interesting around. We will be examining many likely (as well as unlikely) ways in which our existence on this planet is predicted to end. This class is not for the extremely paranoid.

Organic Chemistry - Nomenclature of Hydrocarbon
Teachers: Steven Mo

Ever wonder how to speak like organic chemists? Well...the first step toward being one is to know how to name some basic organic compounds: the hydorcarbons! In this brief one-hour presentation, we will learn all the tricks and useful tools to name many many hydrocarbon compounds! It will be so much fun :)

Items to bring: paper and pen/pencil

Reviving the Electric Car
Teachers: Irene Berry

Taught by members of MIT's Electric Vehicle Team, this course will cover the basics of electric vehicle technologies, compare electric and gasoline vehicles, and introduce the steps for converting a gasoline vehicle into an electric vehicle.

Mach's Principle
Teachers: Kenan Diab, Haofei Wei

Get some insight on this often-confusing, poorly-formulated, more-philosophical-than-scientific musing on general relativity which Einstein somehow fell in love with.


Prerequisites
Physics

Physics of Figure Skating
Teachers: aubrey samost

Have you ever watched those skaters on tv and wondered how they could do everything? Did you ever suspect that maybe the girl in "Ice Princess" was onto something? Or do you just think that the physics of free falling bodies is really cool? This class will cover basic ideas from mechanics with some awesome skating moves. You don't need any background in physics for this class. We'll go somewhat into the calculus behind the concepts, but only as a way to derive common algebraic formulas.

Snap, Crackle, BOOM!!! A Fiery Introduction to Chemistry

This is chemistry the way it was meant to be taught - with flames and explosions! Learn about simple reactions and basic chemistry through exciting demos.

Zoology
Teachers: Michael Melgar

Curious about the world around you? Or about the other creatures that share it with you? Zoology is an often underestimated field especially in a technical setting (MIT or even in high school). This class will explore what an animal is as well as how animals live and affect our lives.

Animal Behavior
Teachers: Narine Mousissian

This class will be taught in a discussion-based format, and it will include an overview of many interesting behaviors of animals. You will learn more sophisticated ways of thinking about why animals act the way they do, hear about some amazing creatures, and come to recognize and appreciate the animal nature in all of us ;)

What is Chemical and Biological Engineering?
Teachers: Lu Chen

You've heard the term tossed around all the time. What exactly is it? What does it entail? The course will provide a brief introduction to the growing field of biological engineering. Students will also get a tour of the MITChemical-Biological Teaching lab, and gain some hands-on experience with a brief experiment.


Prerequisites
Biology

The Building Blocks of the Earth and Solar System

Have you ever wondered about what the Earth is made of? Can you spend hours looking at crystals, minerals and rocks? Are you curious about how the rocks on Mars, the Moon and other planetary bodies differ from those on the Earth? Do you want to understand something of the world around us? If you can answer yes to any of the above, come and learn about rocks, minerals, and planetary geology with us!

On Black Holes, Singularities, and the Event Horizon: A Journey
Teachers: Michael Shaw

We're going to dive right in to the most massive objects in our universe--billions of times the mass of the sun. (Note: we won't actually dive into a black hole--its hard to get out). When small stars die, they peter out. When massive stars die, they explode in supernovas, outshining an entire galaxy, and whats left is a black hole, a singularity of mass so dense that even light is trapped behind. We'll tour around a few black holes, study their effect on our daily lives, and of course, the seven ways a black hole can kill you. I'll venture into wormholes, white holes, and other extoics, and we'll even bring in a sporting interest and talk about how Stephen Hawking once lost a bet on black holes, and how it was related to the ultimate demise and even death of these most mysterious of objects. (Food for thought: how does a black hole die, anyway?) Be ready to open your minds, to be bent by the curvature of spacetime, and generally to lose yourself in the fun and beauty of the most amazing objects out there in the sky.


Prerequisites
Algebra I

Nuclear Reactors Explained
Teachers: Sho Uemura

This class will explain how a nuclear reactor controls, contains and converts the energy of nuclear fission. Current and future reactor designs will be discussed.


Prerequisites
High school physics

Back of the Envelope Physics
Teachers: Michael Shaw

Some physicists use Beowulf clusters with 500+ computer networked together, working for months to do "simple" calculations.

Others use the back of an envelope. Many supposedly challenging problems in physics can be solved, literally, on the back of an envelope. Using physics you already know and little to no mathematics, we can figure out why stars explode into supernovae when they do and how high mountains can grow (or whether we really can build a space elevator).

The techniques used in class can be applied outside of physics to understand numbers of all sizes in your daily life, and should give you valuable insight to why science is fun and not just textbook problems to be worked out in excruciating detail.


Prerequisites
Algebra I and some high school chemistry or physics

Make Your Own Ice Cream

What kind of ice cream do you like? Vanilla, strawberry chocolate chip, butterscotch banana, some other crazy concoction? Learn how to make (and eat) your own ice cream using milk, sugar, ice, and salt. Please bring your own gloves.

What can a semiconductor do for you?
Teachers: Liza Plotnikov

We all know the standard high school chemistry explanation: metals conduct, insulators insulate, and semiconductors can't make up their minds. Let's go beyond that. We'll start out by exploring the electronic structure of semiconductors and what it is that makes them so useful. Then we'll move on to looking at what types of devices can be made from semiconductors -- everything from LEDs to solar cells!


Prerequisites
a basic knowledge of chemistry and physics will be helpful, but not required

Exploring Pharmacology
Teachers: Mariya Gusman

People take drugs. They take drugs that make their noses stop running and drugs that make them see crazy colors. They take drugs that calm them down, drugs that wind them up, and drugs that do some wacky things in between. We’ll be discussing the mechanisms and effects of over-the-counter, prescription, and recreational drugs, as well as some of the societal issues that surround the topic. This class will provide a good neuroscience background in the relevant areas, but will be taught in a way that encourages you to share what you may know--or to ask the questions that you may have.


Prerequisites
high school biology

Snap, Crackle, BOOM!!! A Fiery Introduction to Chemistry

This is chemistry the way it was meant to be taught - with flames and explosions! Learn about simple reactions and basic chemistry through exciting demos.

Internal Biowars Part 1: Immune System
Teachers: Anna Poukchanski

First of a series of two classes about the war between pathogens (disease causing organisms) and immune system.

Your immune system works hard to fight off bacteria, viruses, and everything else that may try to attack your body. Usually, it is extremely efficient.

Find out what cells make up your immune system, how they function, how they protect you from viruses, bacteria, amoeba and other evil pathogens.

Internal Biowars Part 2: The Pathogens
Teachers: Anna Poukchanski

The second class in a series of two about the war between pathogens (disease causing organisms) and immune system.

So your immune system can fight off some pathogens. It is a highly efficient mechanism, as you will discover in Part 1.

Now find out how pathogens have evolved to fight back. We'll discuss a variety of viruses and bacteria, including HIV, HSV, Black Death, Turberculosis...

Come learn about the Dark Side!


Prerequisites
Internal Biowars Part 1: Immune System

The basics of interstellar warfare

Real title: Defending a gravity well against a first strike counter-value attack from an interstellar known-physics adversary with a sub-solar mass economy, or dodging rocks

We discuss the basic methodologies that might be used in an interstellar war. We restrict our attention to things that are plausible given presently known physics. You will not see any faster than light travel. You will see discussion of relativistic bombardment, innocuous anti-matter weapons, Von Neumann devices, and anything else we can come up with.

Plasmas and fusion: science and energy for the future!
Teachers: Antoine Cerfon

In this class, we will study one of the most exciting solutions to global warming and the future energy crisis: nuclear fusion!
Curious to discover how to make energy out of water? Ever tried to imagine what matter is like at around 200 million degrees Celsius? Ever wondered what a plasma was? Want to know about other plasma physics applications? This class is exactly for you! We'll use very basic physics concepts to walk through this very recent and exciting field of science, from fluorescent bulbs to fusion reactors!


Prerequisites
No prerequisites for this class, except for an unquenchable thirst and curiosity to understand and learn more about physics!:)

Dream it, Design it, Do it
Teachers: Teacher Teacher

This class will purely be about coming up with ideas and making drawings of those ideas, like one big brainstorming session for problems we create. We will first come up with a bunch of problems that we will solve by sketching solutions and coming up with the craziest ideas we can think of. This class will require students to be creative, to think outside the box, and to draw their ideas on sheets of paper. Paper will be provided; PLEASE BRING A WRITING IMPLEMENT OR TWO.

Electrons and Electricity
Teachers: Robert Moffatt

A beginner's guide to what electricity is and how it works. Some topics include electric and magnetic fields, charges, atoms, conductors, circuits, transistors, vacuum tubes, tesla coils, radio waves, light and lasers.


Prerequisites
some algebra

Go Neurons Go
Teachers: Abby Noyce

These cells are the fundamental information-handling unit in your nervous system. We'll talk about basic neuron structure, the workings of the action potential, and some of the chemicals and neurotransmitters that make the system go.

This may be a bit basic for students with a strong biology background.

Learning on the Brain
Teachers: Abby Noyce

What happens in your brain when you learn new information? We'll talk about the structures that are involved in memory and about how the brain physically changes to store new information. Some biology background (on the level of "The brain is part of the nervous system. It's made of neurons. Neurons communicate with each other.") is advised.

Subliminal influences on your decisions

Why do people named Penelope prefer Pepsi but people named Chris prefer Coke? Could the temperature of my cup of coffee really affect how much I like you later? In this class we will discuss surprising evidence that people's decisions and desires are affected by very subtle changes in the environment around them, and will ultimately discuss whether the decisions we make are really our own.


Tricks With Turbulence, Session 1

Have you ever wondered how smoke rings form or why dust sticks to fans? We will demonstrate these and other turbulence related phenomena through theory and experimentation. This class is identical to Tricks With Turbulence, Session 2.

Big Bang Cosmology
Teachers: Tongyan Lin

What happened in the early universe and how did it lead to the world we see today? To try and answer this question, we'll discuss inflationary cosmology, curved spacetime, the cosmic microwave background, and big bang nucleosynthesis. We'll discuss how our observations of supernovae, blackbody radiation, and matter content today can tell us about the universe billions of years ago. Finally, this class will give an overview of some modern areas of research of cosmology, such as dark matter/energy and the cosmological constant.

Interesting Tidbits of Pharmacology: Part I
Teachers: Zak Fallows

Did you know that Viagra might reduce jet lag, or that the chemical warfare agents BZ and VX nerve gas are mutual antidotes for one another? Would you be surprised to hear that there is a narcotic painkiller ten thousand times more potent than heroin? This class will explain these fascinating pharmacological tidbits and many more, including topics of interest like SSRI antidepressants and ADHD medications. This class is divided into two one-hour parts for your scheduling convenience, you can take just the first part, or just the second part, or sign up for both parts if you want to hear all of the stories.

Oceanography

Learn about cool topics in oceanography!

Make Your Own Motor

Motors: they make stuff run. Learn about motors and make one for yourself! We'll first try to understand the basic principles behind the workings of a motor, and then we'll build a simple motor from scratch that you can take home with you.

Make Your Own Motor

Motors: they make stuff run. Learn about motors and make one for yourself! We'll first try to understand the basic principles behind the workings of a motor, and then we'll build a simple motor from scratch that you can take home with you.

Introduction to the Earth
Teachers: Rae Zucker

The history of the planet earth is a fascinating story that is ever-changing as geology advances. In this course, we will explore how the Earth got here and what its doing. Volcanoes, plate tectonics, meteorites, tsunamis, magnetism, the formation of the moon, and other catastrophic events and unlikely players are all chapters in our home rock's life story. I want the class to be interactive, so bring your questions and enthusiasm, and I'll do my best to answer.

Racing Physics: Land
Teachers: Shane Colton

What is the "perfect" line? How are gear ratios chosen? Can an F1 car really drive on the ceiling? Answer this and other auto racing questions using basic high school physics, then test these concept is Gran Turismo 4.


Prerequisites
Some HS physics helpful but not required.

The Most Important Science
Teachers: Rae Zucker

Materials science!!!! This class takes a look at what the world is made of and why this science is the most important one. Sure, physics and chemistry form the theoretical basis, but everything is a material, and materials science bridges the gap between theory and advancing science and society. In this class, we will explore crystal structures, what defines a glass, and what this all means for the bulk properties. What about polymers? Metals? Ceramics? Nanoparticles? what do these words all mean and how do we classify materials? why are they important? We will end the class with a few examples of current research in this field. You may find yourself amazed at what challenging problems are being solved. How do artificial hearts work? How can you stand in the Namib dessert and have a full glass of water in a few hours without doing a thing? This and more materials "magic tricks"...


Prerequisites
A basic knowledge of chemistry

Engineering Disasters
Teachers: Robert Seater

Really big engineering failures -- the ones that kill people and cost billions of dollars -- don't happen because of bad luck, operator error, or inadequate engineering skill. They are emergent properties of the business culture, operating environment, and technical complexity of the system.

In this course, we will examine several examples of major engineering failures, understand why they happened, and why they weren't prevented. In doing so, we will analyze competing notions of causality, risk, and blame.

Racing Physics: Sea
Teachers: Dayan Paez

A minute to learn... a lifetime to master! The oldest form of transportation is just as intriguing today as it was millenia ago. Learn how to fly with the wind, how to tame a machine many times your weight, and learn from the sea. We will discuss sailing strategies and see cool demos!


Prerequisites
High School Physics preferred

Interesting Tidbits of Pharmacology: Part II
Teachers: Zak Fallows

This is a continuation of Tidbits: Part I, though part I is not necessary to understand and enjoy part II.

Intro to Chemical Structure Determination
Teachers: Sid Creutz, Kevin Hwang

How do chemists figure out the identity chemical compounds? When appearance, smell, and taste are not enough, they must turn to more advanced methods to figure out what exactly they have in their flasks. A number of important tools have been developed to do this, including NMR, mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. This class will be a brief introduction to using these methods to determine the structure of organic compounds.


Prerequisites
one year of high school chemistry

Living on Mars, and Help Make It Happen
Teachers: Bruce Mackenzie

How would you build a House on Mars?

I'll show lots of pictures of possible Mars structures. We will review the conditions on Mars which affect how you would live, work, grow food, and build houses. Differences from Earth include: low temperature, very low pressure, carbon-dioxide atmosphere, almost 25 hour days, long seasons, dust, and radiation. One advantage is lots of cheap land. The Mars soil and air have every element we need to live and build structures, but not in convenient building forms such as wooden 2x4's. We might have to make fiberglass, brick, or aluminum structures. They must be cylindrical to hold the internal air pressure, with air-locks for doors. Oh, incidentally, how to pay for the rocket to get you there is not included. I will also suggest ways you can get involved and help the settlement of space.

If interested, we can form an internet discussion group to continue the discussion. If the class is full, or you are in a younger grade, write to BMackenzie@alum.mit.edu to join the web discussion group.

Microfabrication and MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems)
Teachers: Bradley Kaanta

A brief introduction to microfabrication and MEMS. Want to know how they fabricate those chips that run your computer? Curious how a Wii remote knows which way you're are shaking it? Come find out about really small stuff and how to make it.


Prerequisites
Interst in Engineering

Everything
Teachers: Nicholas DiBella

Reality may be far richer than you've ever imagined. Our universe could be one of infinitely many others, where not only physical conditions differ from our own, but also where physical "constants" and spacetime dimensionalities differ. But why stop there? It might even be that there exist universes that obey entirely different laws of physics. In fact, it has been proposed that for every mathematical structure, there exists a physically real universe, forming an ensemble of universes known as the Level IV Multiverse. Thus, all logically possible worlds exist. This is Everything.

Oceanography

An introduction to Oceanography

Some cancer biology
Teachers: Alice Kaanta

How cancer happens and what's being done about it. Have you ever wondered how cancer develops? What does is mean when someone says they're doing cancer research? Does sunscreen actually matter? Come learn about the science behind the disease. We'll cover the molecular and cellular mechnaisms of this omnipresent disease and its treatment.


Prerequisites
1 year of high school biology

Scandals in Science
Teachers: Alice Kaanta

From the merely absent-minded to the downright mad, science has always attracted large numbers of the never-normal. Come learn the stories of those who've contributed to the sum of human knowlege while behaving badly. Giggles guaranteed. :)

Moore's Law and the Technological Singularity
Teachers: Kendra Beckler

Cybernetic implants, artificial intelligence, the metaverse- science fiction predicts lots of technologies for our future. Which of these have any scientific basis? Moreover, how close are we to acquiring these technologies? By Moore's Law, the amount of technology our society has increases exponentially. What might happen when it starts increasing faster than we can keep up?

Introduction to Special Relativity
Teachers: Kenan Diab, Haofei Wei

Suppose we have two particles moving toward each other at 99% of the speed of light? How fast does one think the other is going? If you said 1.98 times the speed of light, you better take this class, because that's WRONG WRONG WRONG WRONG WRONG.


Prerequisites
A ZEST FOR LEARNING and knowledge of the square root function

A Relaxed Discussion of How Insects Fly and Fish Swim
Teachers: Elena Glassman

A qualitative discussion of the basic interactions between insects and fish and the respective fluids in which they move (i.e. how insects fly and fish swim).

Auditory Neuroscience

Do you wonder how we can hear our name whispered across the room at a large noisy party,
or why we cringe when someone sings out of tune? Ever wonder how the human ear is able
to process sounds in our environment and how it conveys this information to the brain?

Come to this session and find out answers to some of these questions:
-What does the inner ear look like?
-What does the human brain look like? And what do all of the different stops along the
way look like?
-How do all of the different processing stages transform the sound that reaches a
listener?
-What areas of the brain work for language and what happens when a person has a stroke?
-How does the brain process music?
-Is there anything special about the human auditory system or are we just like other
animals?

As a bonus we will dissect and eat a brain-shaped jello at the end of class!


Tricks With Turbulence, Session 2

Have you ever wondered how smoke rings form or why dust sticks to fans? We will demonstrate these and other turbulence related phenomena through theory and experimentation. This class is identical to Tricks With Turbulence, Session 1.


Social Science

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How to Become a Samurai and Ninja in 2 Hours
Teachers: Jennifer Yoo

Samurai - "One who serves." Ninja - "One who is hidden." Almost everyone knows a little about these warriors. But what exactly were they like? Come and learn how to think, act, fight, live, and even die like a samurai and ninja. Which one will you be?


What we say to people, What people hear
Teachers: Josh Shaine

Why is it that I am constantly being misunderstood?! What they think I mean and what I mean have nothing to do with each other. They are irrational. Or are they... Let's see if we can figure out what is going on.

Designer Babies
Teachers: Melissa Kaufman

Genetic research has allowed us already to isolate many genes that control for certain traits. What happens if we could pick the eye color of our kids? Are there any repercussions if we eliminate the genetic predisposition for diseases? Be prepared to have an open mind and discuss these issues.

The Fundamentals of Modern Warfare
Teachers: Erik Fogg, Evan Hefner

War is an ever-changing art. No longer are the days of lining up with muskets--modern warfare is a highly complex, information-hungry operation, relying on high technology, mind-boggling coordination, and unprecedented battlefield knowledge, command, and control. How are these wars fought? What are the key elements of battle, from the squad level to the division level? How the heck is a battalion organized? Come learn how to win your next war, whether you've never heard of an M1A1, or whether you're probably going ROTC.

The class will cover the following: modern military organization, modern military equipment, information warfare, ground tactics, command and control, air and sea power, joint force operations, logistics, strategic operations, and other elements of modern war.

The last half-hour of the lecture will introduce the simulation scenario (to be played the next day for those signed up), both going over the rules and the actors involved. Those not playing can feel free to leave the lecture at this point.

Let's Bring CRISIS Back!
Teachers: Yale Zussman

CRISIS is a program in international affairs for high school students that ran within SPLASH until 2004. It includes a series of seminars, some of which are being offered this year, and a world-affairs simulation in which participants role-play real people in the international system.

The purpose of this session is to recruit students to help staff CRISIS so the simulation can be run again in a future year. We are seeking both parents and students who live within commuting distance of Cambridge so they can attend staff meetings during the coming year.

Introduction to Diplomacy
Teachers: Yale Zussman

Ever wonder what diplomats actually do? Here's your opportunity to find out. We will discuss the purpose of diplomatic activity, how to prepare for negotiations, what to do once negotiations begin, and factors that contribute to effectiveness. Includes a discussion of the application of game theory to the diplomatic process.

Offered by the CRISIS staff.

Introduction to International Law
Teachers: Yale Zussman

International Law (IL) is both similar to and very different from the law we encounter in our nation, state, and community. We will discuss the nature of IL, the basis of its authority, and the areas covered by it. Next, we will discuss the nature and content of treaties. Lastly, we will review the UN system and other international organizations, including the UN's basic organs, the affiliated agencies, regional and functional organizations, and even a few private international organizations.

Offered by the CRISIS staff.

Failed States
Teachers: Yale Zussman

Many of the most serious problems in international affiars today arise from failed states. What is meant by the term "failed state"? What causes this result? What can be done about it? We will look at the factors that contribute to state failure, both in the Third World and in the advanced world.

Offered by the CRISIS staff.

Fundamentals of Modern Warfare - Simulation

Need to sharpen your warfighting skills? After taking the Fundamentals of Modern Warfare, come practice in the most underplayed hot-spot in the world: East Asia. Rich with natural resources, key strategic islands, and ambitious great-powers-to-be, peace in East Asia is getting hard to come by.

Come and lead one of eight elements: Japan, China, Taiwan, North Korea, South Korea, Russia, Vietnam, and the Untied States, controlling their diplomatic and military procedures in a great East Asian conflict of 2010. Fight on land, sea, and air to accomplish the goals of your country, and prevent the success of your rivals.

Most importantly, be ready to put the principles learned in the Fundamentals lecture on Saturday to work! See joint operations and logistics in action in our fast-paced, high-action wargame.


Prerequisites
Fundamentals of Modern Warfare

Paradoxes of Democracy, Voting, and Social Choice
Teachers: Stephen M. Hou

Come learn ideas with applications in mathematics, economics, engineering, and political science! What if, in hypothetical two-way races, Clinton beats Obama, Obama beats Edwards, and Edwards beats Clinton? Is this even possible? (Yes.) What would then be a fair way to decide the "best" preferences of Democrats? Whether it's a T-shirt design contest or a presidential election, voting converts preferences of individuals into a single preference for the community. We'll discuss Arrow's Impossibility Theorem, which states that there is no "perfect" way of doing so. We'll demonstrate a few of the mind-boggling flaws that every voting method must have. Finally, interesting paradoxes in fair division (in particular, apportioning Congressional seats) will be shown.


Prerequisites
Comfort with arithmetic; interest in voting, political science, decision-making, and/or economics

Media power
Teachers: Mekan Yusupov

" Is what I am reading and seeing real? Is it really that bad or is it just made up?" Ever gave a thought about what you see on TV or read on newspaper was true or how much of it was true? Only ...........

Paradoxes of Democracy, Voting, and Social Choice
Teachers: Stephen M. Hou

Come learn ideas with applications in mathematics, economics, engineering, and political science! What if, in hypothetical two-way races, Clinton beats Obama, Obama beats Edwards, and Edwards beats Clinton? Is this even possible? (Yes.) What would then be a fair way to decide the "best" preferences of Democrats? Whether it's a T-shirt design contest or a presidential election, voting converts preferences of individuals into a single preference for the community. We'll discuss Arrow's Impossibility Theorem, which states that there is no "perfect" way of doing so. We'll demonstrate a few of the mind-boggling flaws that every voting method must have. Finally, interesting paradoxes in fair division (in particular, apportioning Congressional seats) will be shown.


Prerequisites
Comfort with arithmetic; interest in voting, political science, decision-making, and/or economics

Conversational Mandarin & Cantonese 101
Teachers: Mindy Eng

Useful conversational Chinese skills for travel and everyday life

49 Reasons Why California Is Better Than Your State
Teachers: Vikki Chou, Kyle Fritz

Each state in the Union has its own significant qualities. Together, they make the United States of America the most powerful nation in the world. However, there is one state that surpases all the others: California. With a rich and varied history and culture, California, the 31st state, has attracted countless millions to its great land. And why is California so attractive to those who seek it out? Perhaps it has something to do with the adventure of its wild west lifestyle, its idyllic climate, the famed Route 66, its fruits and other agricultural gifts, its status as one of the world's ten largest economies, or its magnificent and breathtaking landscapes. It is simply more awesome than any other state.

In this class, we will examine what each state does best, whether it is an economic good, a historical site, or a cultural aspect. Then we will show how California does that thing better. That's right, California is better than your state.

Poverty and Globalization - Beyond Guns, Germs, and Steel.
Teachers: Owen Ozier

Why are poor countries poor? Why are rich nations rich? In this class, we will quickly reflect on the history of the world, then discuss the many facets of globalization in the modern era, and the way they affect poverty in the world today: the information age, the WTO, subsidies, democracies, famines, poverty traps, war, politics, drugs, and disease. We will see how development economics looks at these issues, where it has unraveled mysteries, and where it leaves questions unanswered. How do you change the world? We will do our best to find out.

How to save the world in your spare time
Teachers: Shava Nerad

If you could change one thing in the world, what would it be? What are you most passionate about?

If you have the answers to those questions in mind, you can learn how to make a plan to get started in effecting positive change in the world.

Since all change starts close to home, we'll focus on things you can do now, this year, to make some changes that could give you experience to change more, wider, next year.

Shava's dad worked with Martin Luther King on the civil rights marches in the early-mid 60's. You can inherit and help to pass on some of the lost lessons of that time.

Be really motivated to brainstorm and share ideas. If you are in 7th or 8th grade, be really motivated to brainstorm and share ideas.


Prerequisites
Be willing to plan and do something about it all!

The Future of America
Teachers: Michael Shaw

Since the end of the cold war, the United States of America has enjoyed a status as the world's only superpower. That era is rapidly coming to a close. We will discuss the challenges facing America on military, economic, and cultural fronts, and formulate ideas for how our generation can solve them.

On the military front, America's traditional military supremacy remains unmatched. However, nuclear proliferation is rapidly changing the landscape for mutually assured destruction, providing more nation-states with a nuclear deterrent. Meanwhile, international terrorism is changing the rules, allowing individuals and small groups to challenge nations.

On the economic front, America's infrastructure is rapidly falling behind. The disaster after Katrina, the bridge collapse in Minnesota, the lack of effective mass transit, all lead to the inescapable conclusion that America is trying to build a 21st century nation on 20th century infrastructure. Financial institutions are moving from New York to Hong Kong and London. Technology companies are building facilities in China, India and Taiwan rather than Silicon Valley. We need immediate and large-scale improvements to continue our storied history of economic and technological leadership.

On the cultural front, it can no longer be said that American citizenship is a passport to the world. Our country is seen more for our military than for our freedoms--people see the Pentagon rather than the Statue of Liberty.

Let us gather to discuss these issues. If you think I am wrong, come and tell me. If you have ideas, bring them to the discussion. This is not, nor should it be a lecture, and I expect full participation of everybody in the room.

Global Health and Political Activism
Teachers: Steven White

Everyone knows a lot of people die every year because of disease. But who dies and why? Could any of these deaths have been prevented? If so, why do we leave them for dead knowing we could save them?

This class is about two things. First, exploring the moral issue of why so many people die every year from preventable disease and yet few people see it as a big problem. Second, it's about how to go about solving problems in global health.

How You're Being Lied to With Statistics, and How to Tell
Teachers: Daniel Zaharopol

On June 13, 2007, the New York Times reported that New York City students had made huge gains in math: as many as 11% more were passing the state math exam than the year previously. Does that mean that students had really gotten that much better in one year?

It has been found that countries that use fluoride in their drinking water have a higher cancer rate than other nations. Should we stop using fluoride in our water?

It has been reported in the media and elsewhere that 150,000 young American women die of anorexia each year. (I'll give this one away: only about 60,000 women under the age of 50 die in the US at all each year, making this statistic totally impossible.)

What are we to make of these statistics? Are these honest mistakes, or are we being manipulated? Come find out how to tell when you're being lied to by statistics.

Telling Our Stories: The Importance of Narrative
Teachers: Anya Thetford

In this course, students will explore the importance of narrative from a mainly psychological (but also a sociological and historical) perspective. Students will read and analyze sections taken from personal accounts of historical events and then will produce their own personal account of an event in their lives. We will then go on to discuss the importance of a coherent life story to a person's psychological well-being. From there, we will go on to debate the relative importance of the actual events in a person's life as compared to that person's personal account. Finally, we will tackle the idea of individual identity creation through narrative.

Mοναχός: A History and Exploration of Monasticism
Teachers: Anya Thetford

Through readings and discussion, we will become acquainted with the history of monasticism and the various forms of monastic-like practice found within different religions. Although we will touch upon the traditions found within Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, etc., we will be mainly concerned with Christian monasticism, and in particular the traditions of Eastern monasticism. Our overarching goal will be to attempt to understand what it truly means to be a monastic, and why one would wish to devote his/her life to this ancient and time-honored way of life.

Map Design for Public Transportation
Teachers: LJ Joyner

In this class, we'll look at public transportation maps from a bunch of notable systems – including New York, Chicago, London and Boston, and others – their history, their design, and some of the decisions behind how they look and work.

Ahlan wa Sahlan bikum fi al-Urdun! Welcome to Jordan!
Teachers: Anya Thetford

Students will be introduced to the culture of Jordan by a teacher who has recently returned from an eleven week stay in this beautiful Middle Eastern country! A very brief history and geography lesson will set the stage for a discussion and sampling of various cultural elements (language, dress, cuisine, music, religion, etc.) and the corresponding ways in which visiting westerners may have to adapt in order to fit into and better appreciate Jordanian culture.

Urban Geography & Design: A Short Introduction
Teachers: LJ Joyner

Have you ever wondered what makes cities feel so distinctive? Why are blocks long in some cities, but short in others, and how does block length inform other things? Why do alleys only exist in some places? What determines how neighborhoods develop, where and how buildings are built, and how cities change?

These are some of the questions urban geographers ask, and some of the questions urban planners and designers think about as they decide how to lay out cities and plan development.

We'll start by playing a game of "Name that City", then talk about what makes cities recognizable. Then we'll ask and try to address questions like the ones above, look at a lot of maps and photographs, and in the process get a basic idea of what urban geographers and urban planners do.


Prerequisites
An interest in cities. Also, come with questions like the ones in the course description.

The Camera's Eye: a unique perspective on history
Teachers: Tony Valderrama

The photograph remains a powerful medium even today, capable of freezing a moment for eternity. Join me as we survey the course of human history since the mid-1800s as seen through the camera's eye.

The Camera's Eye: a unique perspective on history
Teachers: Tony Valderrama

The photograph remains a powerful medium even today, capable of freezing a moment for eternity. Join me as we survey the course of human history since the mid-1800s as seen through the camera's eye.

Paradoxes of Democracy, Voting, and Social Choice
Teachers: Stephen M. Hou

Come learn ideas with applications in mathematics, economics, engineering, and political science! What if, in hypothetical two-way races, Clinton beats Obama, Obama beats Edwards, and Edwards beats Clinton? Is this even possible? (Yes.) What would then be a fair way to decide the "best" preferences of Democrats? Whether it's a T-shirt design contest or a presidential election, voting converts preferences of individuals into a single preference for the community. We'll discuss Arrow's Impossibility Theorem, which states that there is no "perfect" way of doing so. We'll demonstrate a few of the mind-boggling flaws that every voting method must have. Finally, interesting paradoxes in fair division (in particular, apportioning Congressional seats) will be shown.


Prerequisites
Comfort with arithmetic; interest in voting, political science, decision-making, and/or economics

global climate change
Teachers: Alana Rivera

Climate change has turned into a hot topic. What does it have to do with the Nobel peace prize? What ever happened to the Kyoto Protocol? This is a big issue involving the science community, the political community, and everyone, everywhere. Come talk about what's going on, and look at why people are skeptical.

Social and Emotional Characteristics of Gifted Children
Teachers: Wenda Sheard

So you're smart, and you like learning *so* much that you're devoting this whole weekend of your life for *more* learning. Just what makes your social and emotional life different from that of average kids your age? Come learn about social and emotional characteristics common to gifted children. Hear what I'm telling your parents on Saturday morning in the new SPLASH parents' program.

Surprising School Facts: Education Policy 101
Teachers: Wenda Sheard

Want to know where to find statistics about schools in your area? Ever hear of Jonathon Kozol's sad school stories? Chubb & Moe's book about democracy gumming up education? The Abell Foundation Report about teacher quality? I'll present some facts, but the bulk of this presentation will be our conversation. If possible, email questions by November 12th to wendasheard@yahoo.com or surprise me at SPLASH.

Unpeeling Layers of the Law
Teachers: Wenda Sheard

When someone says "the law" they might mean a statute passed by the legislature, an ordinance passed by a city, a regulation passed by an administrative agency, or even a decision by a court. Protect yourself from people quoting "the law." Learn how to find laws, learn which laws take precedence over other laws, and learn how to change laws.

Things from Australia That Can Kill You
Teachers: Jessie Mueller

Australia is a neat place, filled cute koalas and coral reefs. Below the surface, however, the country can also be deadly. Come learn about dangerous creatures and situations in Australia, along with honorable mentions and a chance to taste Vegemite!

Religious Belief as a Scientific Construct
Teachers: David Nawi

If you feel that the worlds of science and of religion are completely distinct and have nothing to do with the other, then you might struggle a bit with the central theme of this class. I say that they are intertwined and that science has a lot to teach religion, not in the "beat it down" sense but in the "now I get it" sense. Come learn how close these two worlds really are.

Cognitive Bias: Distortion of Reality & How you view the World
Teachers: Sophia Suarez

Cognitive bias is the distortion in the way humans perceive reality. Bias arises from various life, loyalty and local risk and attention concerns that are difficult to separate.

Join me to explore the various cognitive biases (decision making & behavior, social, probability, and memories) and discover how they are affecting belief formation, business decisions and scientific research!

Non-linear Thinking in a Linear World
Teachers: Josh Shaine

Does doing one thing at a time drive you batty? Do people frequently tell you to pay attention or to 'stay on topic?' Do you think in pictures instead of words? Does the whole "You have to do it in the right order" concept bother you? Join us for an exploration of the How's and Why's of non-linear thinking. We'll talk about how to recognize and develop strengths, not just how to 'fit in.'


Prerequisites
Open Mind